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1answer
39 views

Can photons “stop time”?

If traveling past the speed of light causes time to reverse than does traveling in time make time "stop"? If not then how do photons/mass-less particles experience time, if at all.
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2answers
55 views

Times at relativistic speeds

Consider an observer $A$ moving in a spaceship at a speed close to $c$, relative to an observer $B$. The $B$ knows that the time on $A$ runs slower, but in the inertial frame of $A$, $B$ is moving ...
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2answers
50 views

Why do objects seem to move faster (relatively) when they move tangential to the observer?

I've observed this loads of times while travelling, in cars, trains,etc.I can't quite put it in words and therefore I've roughly made a diagram to assist my question. Assume an observer is travelling ...
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0answers
20 views

Is speed of light in vacuum the same same for all observers throughout the universe [duplicate]

How can be speed of light same same for all observers throughout the universe? If it be proved wrong then the entire relativity will collapse because the basic principle for relativity is the same.
1
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1answer
117 views

Possible Answer To The Double-Slit Experiment [closed]

I think I might have figured the double-slit experiment out. I am not going to explain it here, Google it if you don't know it. If I am wrong please tell me why: Matter are relative to observers ...
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0answers
28 views

How does a frame of reference work in relativity? [duplicate]

I am struggling to understand what frame of reference means in relativity. Imagine the twin scenario. Twin A is at rest, while twin B travels somewhere and back at near the speed of light. If one ...
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4answers
89 views

Special Relativity - travelling close to light speed

When we say something travels close to the speed of light, what is its speed relative to? For example, we have 4 highly advanced spacecraft at rest beside each other, labelled A, B, C and D. We ...
4
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3answers
321 views

A sees B's clock running slow and B sees A's clock running slow? [duplicate]

This paradox is very common it seems, in which A sees B's clock running slow and B sees A's clock running slow. Here is the question a little more concretely. Let's say B flies by A's spaceship. If ...
6
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3answers
219 views

Is energy content of a system different dependending on the observer?

For the sake of simplicity, let's imagine that the entire Universe is empty except for a single lump of (classical) matter with mass $m$. In its center of momentum frame, it is clear that the total ...
1
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1answer
78 views

Turning off point for 1g acceleration

Let's say I am on a ship accelerating with 1g. I want to keep the engine running for half a year ( to an observer from my point of origin ) but due to time dilation it would have to be sooner than ...
4
votes
4answers
259 views

What does observation mean in two-slit electron diffraction experiment? [duplicate]

My question is clear, that I ask: What do we mean by "observation" in 2-slit experiment for electrons (or any other wave-particle)? You know, we say that :"if we observe the electron, it shows a ...
1
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1answer
281 views

Time dilation - Earth & Jupiter [duplicate]

I have this doubt after watching Interstellar movie :) Lets assume I am in Jupiter. (I know it is a gas planet, full of hydrogen and helium, has extreme pressure etc. Lets please ignore those facts ...
0
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2answers
87 views

Consistent answers in special relativity [closed]

I was doing a question about if a train fits in a tunnel. From the train frame it does not and from the tunnel frame it does. Then the question asked are these two answers consistent? What does this ...
0
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0answers
31 views

How does an observer in arbitrary state of motion assign numbers to events in a flat spacetime?

In a flat spacetime, there is an inertial observer, who assigns events coordinates in a usual fashion: Placing a clock everywhere and synchronize them. From his POV, the other observer is moving in ...
0
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1answer
58 views

How does “observation” affect physics?

I watched this video which very very comprehensively demonstrates concept that sometimes particles behave differently based on whether or not they're being observed. The idea that observing something ...
-1
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2answers
172 views

Why does time slow down when traveling at high speeds [duplicate]

One of the effects of traveling at high speeds is slowing down of clocks. I can understand gravity time dilation effect but not how would velocity affect clock speeds. How correct it is, if I say ...
0
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2answers
87 views

If a photon is exists in 'timeless' state, how can objects around it move? [duplicate]

My understanding is that light does not experience time. In attempting to understand what the universe would be like from the perspective of a photon, the answer I get is that the universe would be ...
1
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2answers
90 views

Does inbound light slow down (for an external observer) as it approaches the event horizon?

As I understand, for an external observer nothing even enters a black hole because it takes infinite time in his frame of reference for something to actually reach the event horizon. I also read that ...
5
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5answers
389 views

Formal definition of an observer?

What is the formal definition of an observer in special relativity? I have seen a few: The actual coordinate system. The collection of synchronised clocks that cover the coordinate system. A well ...
15
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3answers
2k views

Is it a postulate or a well proven fact that speed of light remains constant w.r.t any observer?

We usually heard that speed of light in vacuum $c$ remains same no matter how observer is moving? I am wondering whether is it taken as a postulate or a proven phenomenon that $c$ is constant ...
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0answers
33 views

In Quantum Physics would a camera count an observer that causes wave collapse? [duplicate]

Would the observation from a camera have the same effect on wave function as the observation from a living being?
1
vote
1answer
112 views

What wilI I observe when travelling at almost the speed of light? [duplicate]

If I and a group of friends are travelling at or just below the speed of light - can I see myself, can I see them, or they me? Would we see anything at all?
0
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1answer
54 views

How can we assume that reaching the speed of light slows down time? [duplicate]

How can we assume that gaining the speed of light slows down time?
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0answers
18 views

Conservation of energy with the change of observers

While trying to analyze a collision of two bodies, while considering the energy loss, I made this equation: $1/2m_1u_1^2 + 1/2m_2u_2^2 = 1/2m_1v_1^2 + 1/2m_2v_2^2 - W$ where $u_1$ and $u_2$ are the ...
0
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0answers
69 views

What does traveling close to speed of light mean?

This has been bugging me for a while. We all know in relativity that if you travel close to speed of light, all sorts of crazy things happen. But what does it mean to travel close to speed of light? ...
0
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1answer
65 views

Two quantum observers

It is considered that a quantum mechanics parameter is undefined until it is measured.But what happens if two independent observers measure the same quantum parameter? Do they get the same value or ...
23
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6answers
6k views

Should I abandon my thought experiment about time?

I'm trying to think about special relativity without "spoiling" it by looking up the answer; I hope someone can offer some insight - or at least tell me I'm wrong. Suppose I have an ordinary clock ...
4
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2answers
112 views

In the double slit experiment, what happens when there is more than one observer trying to see which slit the same electron goes through?

From all the demonstrations Iv been able to find of Heisenberg's double slit experiment, whenever an observer tries to "see" which slit an electron passes through it collapses the wave function. My ...
0
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2answers
30 views

How can I calculate the center of an object relative to a focal point and a moving observer? [closed]

I'm developing an app that contains a 3D scene which the user can navigate. As the user moves it gives the illusion that you are browsing a real landscape but for the illusion to work I need to know ...
1
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1answer
82 views

Special relativity: circumventing velocity-addition formula

Two spaceships approach an observer from an equal distance and from an opposite direction with an equal speed $v$ in the observer's intertial reference frame $O$. The speed of a spaceship in the ...
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5answers
618 views

A thought experiment in special relativity theory

We have two sets: set No.1 and set No.2 as in this picture: The observer is fixed to set No.1 . He sees set No.1 motionless and observes set No. 2 approaching with velocity 100,000 m/s. Each set ...
28
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5answers
3k views

What do you really see on a line of clocks as you pass by them at high speed?

According to my understanding of SR, if I travel at 0.8c relative to a line of clocks, I should see the clocks in front of me going 3 times faster than my own, and those behind me going 3 times slower ...
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3answers
335 views

A question about special relativity theory

We have two sets: set No.1 and set No.2 as in this picture: The observer is fixed to set No.1 . He sees set No.1 motionless and observes set No. 2 approaching with velocity 100,000 m/s. Each set ...
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0answers
16 views

Quantum observation in the double slit experiment? [duplicate]

As far as quantum observation, when a human observes electrons going through the double whole experiment, have scientist tried having a blind person observe the experiment to see if the electrons ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Bug riding on a ball moving at almost the speed of light [closed]

A ball with a bug on it is thrown at almost the speed of light. The bug looks back and observes the thrower throwing the ball. In the context of special relativity, what is the weight and the height ...
2
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3answers
82 views

In terms of physics, does the phrase “time slows down” mean the same thing as “things happen more slowly?”

The common definition of "time" is a type of measurement, like size. But the sentence "size gets bigger" doesn't make any sense. Is "time slows down" an odd phrasing of "events occur more slowly" or ...
2
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4answers
124 views

How much could one slow down aging using existing spacecraft?

Imagine that I board a spacecraft and head away from the Earth at top speed until I've aged twenty years, then I turn around and come back. How much younger will I be than the unexciting folk who hung ...
0
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5answers
390 views

Why Light and Observers have different laws of physics [closed]

Special relativity states: The speed of light in a vacuum is always $c$, regardless of the velocity of the observer. The laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion. These two ...
0
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3answers
143 views

Twin Paradox speed of light

Twin Paradox Can anyone clarify and or correct the following for me? A space ship is flying at speed v equal to 0.8 times the speed of light. Within the ship are three stations, a transmitter at ...
1
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1answer
48 views

Light cone and order of events?

If one event lies outside the light cone of another, can the events to some observers appear in a different order in one reference frame compared to the other, and is this the only time when this is ...
2
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3answers
668 views

Would a craft travelling increasingly close to the speed of light appear to be decelerating?

I've been pondering the implications of time dilation. Is it right to assume that if a craft was travelling at a speed very close to the speed of light (>= 0.9999c for example), that to an external ...
3
votes
4answers
239 views

Traveling between two planets at rest to one another [duplicate]

If I travel at relativistic speed from planet A to planet B which are at rest relative to one another, I will be younger than people on A or B when I arrive. However how does this mesh with the fact ...
1
vote
2answers
234 views

Is time subjective?

In Minkowski spacetime time is subjective [or more precisely: time is different for every particle/ reference frame]. It is the coordinate time of an observer whose reference frame travels up the ...
0
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3answers
88 views

Is proper time an intrinsic value of Minkowski space?

What is proper time? Is it a part of Minkowski space (that is a mere spacetime interval)? Or is it an intrinsic characteristic of massive particles (a sort of "aging")? Example: In the following ...
2
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2answers
78 views

Is it ok to have two events $A$ and $B$ so that for one person $A$ occurs before $B$ but for another $B$ preceds $A$

Imagine two laser beams A and B are released at the same moment to bounce between two mirrors, A was moving and B was at rest, doing the calculations I found that for a person at rest B would reach ...
2
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0answers
42 views

Observers in (Schwarzschild-) de Sitter spacetime

In (pure) de Sitter spacetime, the cosmological horizon is said to be ‘observer dependent’. I imagine that as the observer always being in the center of that horizon. Another (spacelike separated) ...
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1answer
494 views

Why does time dilation cause you to age slower? And is time considered relative to the observer?

I understand that the higher your velocity the slower light will move. But how does time itself slow down while you are moving faster?
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5answers
544 views

Clocks in special relativity

One book on special relativity says: Any observer at rest relative to his own timepiece will see that other clocks moving with respect to him run fast - the greater their speed, the faster they ...
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3answers
105 views

Spacetime, space observables and time observables

It appears to me that the concepts of space and time play a privileged role in Physical Theories. If we look at classical non-relativistic theories such as point particle mechanics, rigid body ...
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0answers
39 views

How do you determine who is moving “faster” in relativity? [duplicate]

I suspect this question has a simple answer, but I can't get my head around it. The classic example of a person in orbit around the Earth at high speed experiencing a slower passage of time than the ...