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2answers
124 views

Why is only one quantity of angular momentum i.e. $L_z$ quantized & not $L_x$ & $L_y$?

This is quoted from Arthur Beiser's Concepts of Modern Physics: Why is only one quantity of $\mathbf{L}$ quantized? The answer is related to the fact that $\mathbf{L}$ can never point in any ...
3
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1answer
215 views

The dual role of (anti-)Hermitian operators in quantum mechanics

Hermitian (or anti-Hermitian) operators are of central importance in quantum mechanics in at least two different incarnations: Observables are represented by Hermitian operators on the quantum ...
1
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1answer
108 views

Superposition and simultaneous observation

Trying to understand superposition. Ok, so double slit experiment. The multiple paths the particle simultaneously travels interfere with each other but as it is absorbed, it chooses one "actual" ...
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6answers
17k views

What is the Physical Meaning of Commutation of Two Operators?

I understand the mathematics of commutation relations and anti-commutation relations, but what does it physically mean for an observable (self-adjoint operator) to commute with another observable ...
1
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1answer
166 views

Are the authors saying that the observer effect plays no role in Bohr's thought experiment of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle?

Here is an excerpt from Eisberg & Resnick's Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei, and Particles. Here is introducing Bohr's though experiment to establish a physical origin for the ...
1
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1answer
32 views

“Independent simultaneous eigenbras” in Dirac's book 'Principles of Quantum Mechanics'

I've been puzzling through this book off and on and can usually work out what is going on via other external references on the Intertubes. But, this paragraph from pages 55 and 56 has me a bit ...
1
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1answer
100 views

The Eigenstate Existence Problem in Dirac's book 'Principles of Quantum Mechanics'

In Chapter II of Dirac's book Principles of Quantum Mechanics, Dirac explains that in general it is very difficult to know whether, for a given real linear operator, that any eigenvalues/eigenvectors ...
0
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3answers
58 views

Do we get the same answer at any time if we measure a system's energy?

Schrödinger's equation says that the only allowed energy states of a system are the eigenvalues of the energy operator $H$. This means that if we measure the energy of the system at any time we ...
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4answers
961 views

Really how can an observable quantity be equal to an operator?

A wave-function can be written as $$\Psi = Ae^{-i(Et - px)/\hbar}$$ where $E$ & $p$ are the energy & momentum of the particle. Now, differentiating $\Psi$ w.r.t. $x$ and $t$ respectively, ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Particle in a box - speed probability distribution

Consider a particle in a box with infinite barriers. By solving the Schrödinger we can find the probability of finding the particle at some points in the box. How can we find the probability of ...
0
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2answers
98 views

Would $[\hat{Q},\hat{H}]$ correspond to an observable? [closed]

Would $[\hat{Q},\hat{H}]$ correspond to an observable? Where $\hat{Q}$ is an observable and $\hat{H}$ is the Hamiltonian. Surely that would just mean that $[\hat{Q},\hat{H}]$ would commute i.e. = 0?: ...
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1answer
82 views
0
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1answer
55 views

How might I show that an operator is, by definition, an 'observable'? [closed]

Here is my problem: I understand what is meant by 'observable' but don't have a formal definition at hand. How do I 'show' it?
0
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2answers
103 views

Observables in Quantum Mechanics

Studying on own quantum mechanics I came across: Preceeding text: A basic postulate of quantum mechanics tells us how to set up the operator corresponding to a given observable. Observables, ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Hamiltonian symmetry Lie algebra

What is the connection between complete set of commuting observables and generators of the Lie group? I have a Hamiltonian written down in second quantized formalism and I also checked that it ...
1
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1answer
54 views

Compatible Observables and Measurement

Suppose $A$ and $B$ are compatible observables (i.e. $[A,B] = 0$). We take the eigenkets of $A$ to be $|a_1 \rangle \ldots |a_N \rangle$. Further, we suppose that the first $k$ eignekets of $A$ are ...
3
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2answers
208 views

What exactly implies the need of quantum mechanics for self-adjoint and not only symmetric operators? [duplicate]

We know that quantum mechanics requires self-adjoint operators, not only symmetric. Can we say that this follows ONLY from the two following axioms of quantum mechanics, namely that each observable ...
2
votes
1answer
125 views

About states, observables and the wave functional interpretation in QFT with gauge fields

First of all, I'm a mathematician, so forgive me for my possible trivial mistakes and poor knowledge of physics. In a QFT, we just start with a field (scalar, vectorial, spinorial, gauge etc), so I ...
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3answers
160 views

What is the meaning of “ Ψ is not a measurable quantity in itself”?

I want to know that why the wavefunction Ψ as a complex quantity (i.e $A+iB$ form) in quantum mechanics and somewhere I have studied that Ψ is not a measurable quantity in itself that's why we ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Quantum state of a system after measurements with non-commutative operators

a) Assume two operators $A$ and $B$. 1) Assume $$[A,B]=0 $$ and $$ ψ= \sum c_n u_n ~~~~\text a~ wavefunction~ describing~ the~ state~ of~ the~ system $$ with $$Aψ=a_n u_n $$ $$Bψ=b_n u_n$$ If we ...
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3answers
106 views

Constants of motion in quantum mechanics

What is the meaning of a constant of motion in quantum mechanics (an observable-operator that commutes with the Hamiltonian) in contrary with classical mechanics?
5
votes
1answer
348 views

Is color charge a quantum mechanical observable?

If I had 2 pions that were identical, except one was comprised of a red and anti-red, and the other was comprised of a green and anti-green, would I be able to perform an experiment that distinguishes ...
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votes
2answers
88 views

Classical notion of trajectory [closed]

Why the classical notion of trajectory is meaningless in quantum mechanics? I am asking here about notion of trajectory from classical mechanics and why in quantum mechanics we cannot use it or is ...
1
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2answers
148 views

Susceptibilities and response functions

It is often confusing whether a susceptibility is the same as a response function, specially that often they are used interchangeably, in the context of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Very ...
2
votes
1answer
172 views

Singlet state and it's expectation value

So. We have a singlet sate $$ \dfrac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\vert\uparrow\downarrow\rangle-\vert\downarrow\uparrow\rangle)$$ And two pauli matrices for z axis - one that acts on 1st spin (lets denote it with ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

How much information does the Hamiltonian contain in quantum mechanics? [closed]

Given a Hamiltonian, let's say of a many-body system, through the Schrodinger equation,in principle we can find the eigenfunctions and their corresponding eigenvalues (spectrum). Now given an ...
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1answer
49 views
0
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2answers
83 views

The delta function as an eigenfunction of the position operator explanation

$\delta (\textbf{r})$ can be interpreted as a wavefunction. [...] It is non-vanishing only for $\textbf{r}=0$. [...] $\delta(\textbf{r})$ is an eigenfunction of the position operator with ...
5
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5answers
733 views

Is the wave function objective or subjective?

Here is a question I am curious about. Is the wave function objective or subjective, or is such a question meaningless? Conventionally, subjectivity is as follows: if a quantity is subjective then ...
0
votes
2answers
112 views

Eigenstate vs collapsed wave function

An eigenstate, or determinate state, is a state where the measurement of some observable always yields the same result. This means that the standard deviation of the observable is zero. If a ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Why tensor product? [duplicate]

Let $A$ an $B$ be two discrete observables (like spins). When exactly and why we have to consider their tensor product when talking about the mutual observation of the corresponding phenomena?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

What is the correct way to treat operators that has “time” in QM? [duplicate]

I don't know if this question has already been resolved but considering that $i\hbar\partial_t$ is the energy operator, and $\partial^2_t$ is the waves operator (or helmholtz), I can't accept that $t$ ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Eigenstates into which a system can be projected after a measurement

I'm currently reading Dirac's Principles of Quantum Mechanics, on page 36, he says: Another assumption we make connected to the physical interpretation of the theory is that, if a certain real ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

If I want to determine a particle's momentum or position, do I get this information from the wave function?

I am confused about how one measures the dynamical variables (eg position) of a particle. I thought the wave function $\Psi(x,t)$ was the probability amplitude and $|\Psi(x,t)|^2$ represents the ...
1
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1answer
73 views

What are the methods of experimentally measuring the observables in quantum mechanics?

Perhaps due to the limited number of textbooks on quantum mechanics I have consulted, I have seen presented the fundamental principles related to observables, but have never seen a somewhat systematic ...
2
votes
2answers
141 views

Eigenvalues being physical observables

I think I'm comfortable with the PDE solutions to the Schrodinger equation. But as soon as we start putting these values in a matrix (in dirac notation), I lose my understanding and everything ...
1
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3answers
2k views

What does the quantum state of a system tell us about itself?

In quantum mechanics, quantum state refers to the state of a quantum system. A quantum state is given as a vector in a vector space, called the state vector. The state vector theoretically ...
2
votes
1answer
221 views

Is kinetic energy in QM a state-property or is it distributed?

Suppose we have a quantum mechanical system, which is well described by its wave function in r-representation $\Psi$. We are interested in the properties of an observable, say the kinetic energy $T$. ...
0
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0answers
40 views

A new operator which gives direction of the momentum of the particle in 1-d space, preserving everything else : Need practical applications

I have introduced a new observable (unitary self-adjoint operator) which seems to give the direction of the momentum of the particle in 1-dimensional space, without disturbing anything else. We can ...
1
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2answers
143 views

Is there a deterministic observable that has only single eigenvalue?

Is there an observable in quantum mechanics which has only one eigenvalue and an eigenspace associated with that single eigenvalue? This observable is deterministic in the sense that it gives same ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Importance of anti-self adjoint operators in quantum mechanics

I learnt that the observables are self-adjoint operators working on wave functions which live in a Hilbert space. The eigenvalues of these operators are real and appear as outcome of measurements. ...
0
votes
3answers
115 views

Differentiation operator with respect to observable acting as a function of the observable?

In his Principles of Quantum Mechanics Dirac writes: $$\int \langle \phi \frac{d}{dq}|q'\rangle dq' \psi(q')=\int \phi(q') dq' \frac{d\psi(q')}{dq'}.$$ To me it is rather strange, and it seems as if ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

Is there a connection between Lie Groups and observable quantities in physics?

Good evening everybody. I have some questions about the relation between Lie groups and observables in physics. Indeed, taking the example of spin formalism of Quantum mechanics I know that Pauli's ...
21
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4answers
520 views

Is every quantum measurement reducible to measurements of position and time?

I am currently studying Path Integrals and was unable to resolve the following problem. In the famous book Quantum Mechanics and Path Integrals, written by Feynman and Hibbs, it says (at the beginning ...
17
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1answer
1k views

Intuitive meaning of Hilbert Space formalism

I am totally confused about the Hilbert Space formalism of Quantum Mechanics. Can somebody please elaborate on the following points: The observables are given by self-adjoint operators on the ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

What are observables? [closed]

What are observables and how are they related to quantum decoherence and wavefunction collapse. I read this: Observables - what are they? but it was about the technical details on observables. Even ...
4
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4answers
842 views

What does observation mean in two-slit electron diffraction experiment? [duplicate]

My question is clear, that I ask: What do we mean by "observation" in 2-slit experiment for electrons (or any other wave-particle)? You know, we say that :"if we observe the electron, it shows a ...
1
vote
2answers
130 views

Is there any non-hermitian operator on Hilbert Space with all real eigenvalues?

The property of hermitian is the sufficient condition for eigenvalue being real. Is there any non-hermitian operator on Hilbert Space with all real eigenvalues? If there exist, then can all ...
1
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2answers
151 views

Why is quantum mechancis is not content with symmetric operators, but wants self-adjoint operators?

A symmetric operator has only real eigenvalues and different eigenvectors corresponding to different eigenvalues are orthogonal. These are exactly what we want for a physical observable. I think ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Physical observables and hermiticity

Is it necessary for an operator to be Hermitian in order to be a physical observable or is it just sufficient that the operator obeys the eigenvalue equation? If I were to check whether an operator is ...