Nuclear physics is the study of the composition, behavior and interaction of atomic nuclei and their constituent parts.

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Spallation neutron generation and pure U-238 reactors

Main question: Is it possible to achieve net power generation based on linear proton accelerator and U-238 target? In the proposed reactor design there is a proton beam with energy ~10 GeV, and on ...
4
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2answers
406 views

Why doesn't a nuclear fuel pool become irradiated?

Why doesn't the volume of water in a nuclear fuel pool become irradiated? Why wouldn't the water around the pool become radioactive and circulate around making the whole thing deadly? My question ...
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2answers
100 views

Is fission reaction considered natural or artificial? [closed]

As I learned, nuclear fission doesn't occur without the control of a human made nuclear reactor, by hitting a neutron to a fissile isotope. Thus, the fission reaction is considedred as a part of ...
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1answer
272 views

Coordinate system

Quoting from 'Nuclear Physics - Theory and Experiment' by RR Roy, BP Nigam 2005 edition Link to text How did the author arrive at equations (23a, 23b,23c)? Chapter 8 Nuclear model II, 8.7 ...
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2answers
459 views

Does Uranium-235 always split into Krypton and Barium in nuclear fission?

In most nuclear fission examples and exercises, the products of a nuclear fission of Uranium-235 are two light nuclei of Krypton and Barium: $$\mathrm{ _0^1n + U \longmapsto Kr + Ba + energy }$$ Is ...
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1answer
104 views

Is there still mystery about spin crisis?

The gluon is a vector boson; like the photon, it has a spin of 1. If this is true and if we know the spin of protons and neutrons then why the news SPIN COMES FROM GLUONS? is telling that, we ...
5
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2answers
582 views

Why is the spectrum of the $\beta$-decay continuous?

the spectrum of the Gamma and Alpha decays are both discrete, i.e. the $\alpha$-particles and the $\gamma$-rays take on only discrete values when emitted from a decaying nucleus. Why is it then, that ...
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3answers
2k views

Why is beta negative decay more common than beta positive?

In simple terms, why is beta negative decay more common than beta positive? I know it's something to do with occuring inside/outside the nucleus - but I can't find a simple, easy to understand ...
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0answers
68 views

Thorium based nuclear reactor [closed]

My question is how thorium works as a radioactive nuclear fuel and what are the special properties of thorium based nuclear reactor.
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4answers
326 views

About mass defect

Here's how my book explains mass defect: Particles inside the nucleus interact with each other - they feel attraction. The potential energy $U$ of such attraction is negative, because in absence ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Nuclear Compton Scattering Data

Is there a repository where one can find unpolarized nuclear Compton scattering data $\gamma (Z,N)\rightarrow \gamma (Z,N)$ for specific nuclei $(Z,N)$? or even some parametrization of structure ...
2
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2answers
134 views

Would it be possible to detect nuclear explosion on exoplanet?

How strong would have to be nuclear explosion on exo-planet that orbits some other star for it to be detectable outside of that system. Or it would be impossible due to amount of radiation coming from ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Nuclear explosion wavelength data

I am looking for data source (or chart) of spectral data that is being emitted on detonation of nuclear or thermonuclear explosion. Reason I am looking is to see if this data has specific signature ...
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2answers
46 views

Explosive energy in a container [closed]

What happens when the explosive energy of a grenade or a bomb is contained in a container, if you will, and no energy can be released through the container in the form of heat or sound etc...? Just ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Would being underwater help survive a nuclear bomb?

If I jump in my pool, on the river near my house knowing that a nuclear bomb, or atomic or H-Bomb exploded around 10 km from my house, would I survive? The way I see it is that water will protect me ...
1
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1answer
95 views

Parity of a system composed of 2 particles

I have read that for a system of 2 particles, the total parity is given by: $P=P_1 P_2 (-1)^L$ where $ P_1, P_2$= insisec parity of particle 1, 2 $L$ = relative angular moment what's the meaning ...
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2answers
97 views

Radioactive decay law and the exponential model, is it always valid?

The law of radioactive decay reads $$ N(t)=N_0e^{-\lambda t}$$ Is it valid when there is less than 1 nucleus or particle to decay? Obviously, it is nonsense to consider that we have 1/2 of nucleus ...
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1answer
74 views

Is the half-life of Primordial Nuclide determine only by the age of the earth? [closed]

Is the half-life of Primordial Nuclide determined only by the age of the earth? Or are their other age defining considerations? The point of the question is to know that the only reason that we have a ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Totally antisymetric wavefunction: clarification about terminology

Pauli's Principle says: "The wavefunction of two identical fermions must be totally antisymmetric". I know that, for a antisymmetric wavefunction, $(-1)^L*(-1)^{S+1}*(-1)^{I+1}=-1$ "totally ...
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2answers
126 views

What makes nuclear binding energy so much stronger than chemical energy

The strong force acting between quarks and responsible for holding protons together is 100 times stronger than the electromagnetic force. How come the nuclear binding energy derived from the strong ...
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1answer
33 views

Collision of a heavy charged particle with an electron at rest - Deduction

When I was studying Nuclear Physics I saw this formula about interaction of radiation with matter. The book mentioned that when considering a elastic collision of a heavy charged particle of mass $M$ ...
13
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3answers
2k views

Why do all elements above $\require{mhchem}\ce{Fe}$ not decay to $\ce{Fe}$?

OK, so $\ce{Fe}$ is the most 'stable element'. As such, why do all elements above it not decay into $\ce{Fe}$? In all cases, would it not lead to an increase in binding energy and therefore energy ...
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0answers
47 views

Nuclear Physics: Eigenvalues of nucleus angular moment

In the shell model of nuclei, when we talk about collective motions, we describe any nucleus deformation, expanding its radius on spherical harmonics base like this $R(\theta,\phi) = ...
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0answers
43 views

Why are quark up and down an isospin doublet?

I have some difficulties in understanding the isospin of quarks. As far as I am concerned, the isospin formalism is used to express the physical property of electric charge. I mean: what I know ...
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1answer
54 views

Nuclear fission mechanism: neutron capture

Consider this nuclear fission reaction: $\mathrm{^{235}U+{}^1n\to{}^{236}U \text{ (excited)}\to{} ^{92}Kr+{}^{141}Ba+3{}^1n}$ I have not understand why a thermal neutron ($^1$n with $E\simeq 0.025$ ...
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1answer
32 views

When and why spontaneous nuclear fission is preferred to alpha emission?

I reasoned as follow: the probability of an $\alpha$ emission $^A_ZX\to^{A-4}_{Z-2}X^{'}+\alpha$ is given by: $T=e^{-G}$ where the Gamow factor is given by: $G\simeq \pi \sqrt{\frac{2\mu ...
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7answers
2k views

Why does nuclear fuel not form a critical mass in the course of a meltdown?

A BWR reactor core may contain up to 146 tons of uranium. Why does it not form a critical mass when molten? Are there any estimates of the critical mass of the resulting zirconium alloy, steel, ...
13
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1answer
195 views

Phase factors under rotations of strong and weak isospin

The strong isospin raising operator changes a $d$ quark into a $u$: $$ \tau_+ \big|d\big> = \big|u\big> $$ However, for antiquarks, there is an additional phase factor: $$ \tau_+ \big|\bar ...
2
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3answers
105 views

Tritium decay is spontaneous even if the binding energy of tritium is higher than the binding energy of 3He. Why?

Given this nuclear reaction: $^3_1\mathrm H\to {}^3_2\mathrm{He}+e^-+\bar{\nu}$ and knowing the binding energies: $BE(^3_1\mathrm H)=8.48 \,\mathrm{MeV}$ $BE(^3_2\mathrm{He})=7.72 \,\mathrm{MeV}$ ...
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1answer
101 views

Would a Nuclear bomb have any effect on the sun that could damage the earth?

I was asked this recently and wasn't sure. The power of the sun is much more powerful than that of a Nuclear explosion but the question was what is the worst that could happen, we are assuming a ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Periodic Table and strong fields at high Z

There is a known "phenomenon" recalled by Greiner et al. in several of his books related to hypothetical elements with Z>172: in some point arount this Z, the nuclear field is strong enough to pop out ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Peaks in binding energy per nucleon

Looking at the the binding energy per nucleon chart: I observe peaks for N=4,8,12,16,20,24 while I expected to observe peaks for 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, and 126 because I have heard that in ...
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1answer
32 views

Original Paper on Slow Neutron Capture by Fermi?

I was wondering what the title of his original publication on Neutron capture was. I've found his Nobel lecture but I want to read his initial publication. A title would be most appreciated. It's ...
4
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2answers
112 views

Computer parsable table of nuclides

I am looking for an computer parsable (CSV, XML, JSON, since I didn't find anything, I am happy with almost everything) file (or collection of files) that contains the information you can find in a ...
5
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2answers
5k views

How do alpha and beta particles ionise surrounding particles?

I've been wondering about this question for a while. If you have alpha and beta particles released from a radioactive core, how do they ionise surrounding particles?
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2answers
188 views

Radioactive stability of some nuclei

While studying radioactivity I found that even the most radioactive substances i.e substances with the shortest half lives do not completely degenerate. Suppose there is a 1 mole sample of an ...
6
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1answer
130 views

Why a slow moving neutron is required in nuclear plants?

I came across a line that said "an atom of heavy element is hit with a low velocity neutron, otherwise the required reaction would not achieve result". So, why not a neutron of high velocity is ...
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2answers
779 views

What are nuclear isomers? What is isomeric energy?

Can someone explain nuclear isomers to me, and in particular what the energy involved is? I understand generally that we're talking about moving from a less to more stable configuration of nuclear ...
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0answers
26 views
1
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1answer
101 views

Nuclear shell model - finite square well

I am trying to make a simplified approximation and solve Schrodinger equation in the finite square well to model the nucleus of Ca (shell nuclear model). The potential is $ V(r) = -V_0$ for ...
4
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2answers
188 views

$\require{mhchem}$ $\ce{\beta^{+}}$ decay for $\ce{_9^18F}$, computing $\Delta m$

For the decay: $$\require{mhchem}\ce{_9^18F\to_8^18O +e+ +{v}}$$ To compute $E$, I need $\Delta m$, the provided answer looks like: $$m_i = 18.000938~u$$ $$m_f = 17.999159~u + 2~(5.49 \times ...
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1answer
150 views

why countries can't make nuclear bombs? [closed]

Somehow when I google about the nuclear bombs I find a lot of books and resources that seem to explain everything about how those bombs are made. But sometimes I often hear that countries that want to ...
6
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5answers
6k views

Is it possible to obtain gold through nuclear decay?

Is there a series of transmutations through nuclear decay that will result in the stable gold isotope ${}^{197}\mathrm{Au}$ ? How long will the process take?
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6answers
1k views

Which experiment gave scientists reason to believe nuclear fission/fusion produced energy?

Every piece of knowledge in science has a beginning lying in someone's experiment. I would like to know which experiment gave scientists the reason to believe nuclear fission/fusion existed and was ...
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1answer
1k views

Decay of Cobalt-60 isotope

How does the Gamma decay of Cobalt-60 occur? Motivation: A research team led by D. Habs made contributions to our understanding of the gamma decay of Ca-40 and Zr-90: ...
4
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0answers
70 views

Why does strong interaction increase with distance?

I read numerous times that strong interaction increases with distance. But how can one actually derive the force-distance relation from the lagrangian (quark field + gluon field + gauge coupling)? ...
3
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3answers
537 views

Can I move the atom nucleus only?

I was wondering if it is possible to move the atom nucleus and leave behind the electrons? I can imagine that the electrons will follow the nucleus. But what if the speed of the nucleus is almost the ...
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3answers
5k views

How can a proton be converted to a neutron via positron emission and yet gain mass?

The mass of a neutron is greater than mass of a proton so how is it possible in positron emission for a proton to form a neutron and a positron?
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0answers
126 views

Why is free neutron unstable but free proton is stable?

Aren't they basically made up of the same stuffs (quarks) in almost the same configuration?