Nuclear physics is the study of the composition, behavior and interaction of atomic nuclei and their constituent parts.

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Disintegration of deuteron into n & p by a gamma ray - energy considerations

I was working through a problem that has a Deuteron of mass $M$ and binding energy $B$ disintegrated by a $\gamma$-ray of energy $E_\gamma$ into a neutron and proton. It proceeds to ask to find the ...
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1answer
47 views

Physical meaning of parity in nuclear decays

I think it has to do with asymmetry in direction during emission of decay products .also what is implied physically when we say parity is violated in beta decays? I cannot imagine 'l' having an odd ...
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1answer
141 views

Parkhomov's E-cat reproduction [closed]

In the beginning of the year, Professor Alexander Parkhomov of Lomonosov Moscow State University claimed to have replicated (as read in e.g. Wired) of the E-cat functioning, albeit with lower effect. ...
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Is the direction of gamma-ray emission by a nucleus totally random?

Let's consider an excited nucleus emitting one gamma-ray (not cascade etc). Is the direction of gamma-ray emission completely random? In other words, is the probability to detect this gamma equal for ...
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1answer
56 views

Predict decay chain of a radioactive element

I know there are tables of decay chain of radioactive elements. Is there a way to predict the whole chain from the first radioactive element?
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35 views

Which force accelerates product particles in nuclear reactions?

In nuclear reactions, the difference between the binding energy of the reactants and that of the products is converted to the thermal energy of the products. Is the Coulomb force that actually gives ...
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1k views

Why not dilute radioactive waste?

Radioactive wastes are dangerous because unstable elements are too concentrated. Originally radioactive elements come from nature where they were very diluted and that's why they were secure. So why ...
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4answers
78 views

Change in the half-life of a neutron

What would happen if the half-life of a neutron was much more less than it is now? How could this affect the nuclei?
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34 views

Nuclear transmutation of radioactive waste using high-energy neutrons

How likely does this work: Accelerate neutrons to as high energy as possible (particle accelerators/ cosmic rays ...) and hit (small samples of) our radioactive waste with it such that it is converted ...
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17 views

Beta Decay: Fermi and Gamov-Teller decays for Neutron - >Proton Decay. Both are possible?

So I've been reading this textbook that says a decay from Neutron to Proton is $n$ -> $ p $ gives a $\frac{1}{2}^{+}$ -> $\frac{1}{2}^{+} $ decay This is corresponds to $\triangle I=0$ which is a ...
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1answer
1k views

Reason why stars do not produce elements heavier than iron

In his book "Origins", Neil deGrasse Tyson says that "if you seek to split iron nuclei apart, you must them with additional energy. On the other hand, if you combine iron atoms they will also absorb ...
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40 views

Nuclear Fusion using magnetic fields

I was wondering if you could use a very strong magnetic field to produce nuclear fusion. The basic idea is a spherical cavity containing Deuterium (and possibly tritium) nuclei whose walls will be ...
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1answer
109 views

Can energy be weighed?

The binding energy of nucleus is calculated as- Mass defect = (Total mass of nucleons-Mass of the nucleus) And after that $E=mc^2$ is used for calculating the binding energy. Hot water is heavier ...
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91 views

Why are Electromagnetism, Strong & Weak Nuclear and Gravitational Forces different?

If they are different then why the only thing that we 'see' in them, and that identifies them, the so called 'force' as we call and see it, is same among them all.
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1answer
127 views

Effects of massive magnetic field generated by operation of the large hadron collider?

I read an article about the CERN large hadron collider in which it talks about the magnetic field that is generated while the LHC is operating. A magnetic field more than 100,000 times more powerful ...
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1answer
95 views

Mass conservation during $\beta^+$ and $\beta^-$ decay?

During the above mentioned decays the following happens $$n\to p+e^{-} \ and \ p\to n+e^{+}$$ then i assumed that this implied $$m_n=m_p+m_{e^{-}} \ and \ m_p=m_n+m_{e^{+}}$$ but by adding both sides ...
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1answer
111 views

Why is this nuclear reaction $p\to n+e^++\nu$ forbidden for a free proton? [closed]

Why is this nuclear reaction forbiden for a free proton? $$p\to n+e^++\nu$$ Where $p$ is the proton, $n$ is a neutron, $e^+$ is a positron, and $\nu$ is a neutrino. What i´ve been thinking is because ...
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58 views

Probe the nucleus by using high energy particles

Why alpha particles would give better resolution than protons moving at the same speed? Can it be explained by Heisenberg uncertainty?
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312 views

Does the population of higher level s-shells affect the decay rate of alpha emitters?

Consider a nuclide like $\mathrm{^{232}Th}$, which has a half-life of 1.4e10 years and which decays by $\alpha$ decay to $\mathrm{^{228}Ra}$. Alpha decay is a quantum mechanical tunneling process in ...
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1answer
179 views

What happens to mass during beta decay?

Sorry for being ignorant, but I'm in high school and our chemistry teacher barely went over beta decay. I decided to do some research and learned that in β+ decay, positrons are emitted from protons ...
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1answer
167 views

Does the rest mass energy include the potential energy of the particle?

The potential energy (as far as I have studied - that is, mainly classical physics) depends on the reference level, since its absolute value cannot be calculated. It can therefore be negative as well. ...
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4answers
120 views

Why can't a nuclear reactor be used as a rocket motor?

Nuclear fission, and potentially fusion, reactors generate vast amounts of energy, primarily as heat. What stops us from harnessing that energy to propel spacecraft at or above escape velocity from ...
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0answers
17 views

Diffusion of magnetization (NMR)

In the context of MRI I'm trying to understand the mechanisms of magnetization diffusion. Consider a sample that is magnetized by an external magnetic field. We have displacement of magnetic moment ...
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2answers
69 views

Does chemical energy contribute to mass? [duplicate]

Does chemical energy contribute to the mass of an object? I don't mean the bond energy, but the possible energy that could be released (i.e. Does an atom of oxygen and a molecule of hydrogen (H2) have ...
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1answer
34 views

How the number of binary collisions increases with centrality faster than the number of participant in heavy ion collisions?

How the number of binary collisions increases with centrality faster than the number of participant in heavy ion collisions at different particle colliders?
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152 views

Nuclear to Electricity Energy Conversion

Currently nuclear power generates heat, which heats water into steam that turns conventional turbines. The energy conversion is as follows: photonic->heat->kinetic->electric This would result in low ...
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196 views

Why is the Spin of the photon neglected?

We know photons have spin s=1. However, in Nuclear physics, the conservation of angular momentum in case of Gamma transitions is employed as follows: $$\vec J_i=\vec J_f+\vec L$$ where $J_i$ is the ...
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Why is boron so good at neutron absorption?

Why is boron so good at absorbing neutrons? Why does it have such a large target area compared to the size of its nucleus?
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166 views

In a nuclear reaction, where does the energy go?

Lets say two hydrogen fuse together, where does the energy released go? Is it carried away as momentum imparted on the helium atom? Is it carried away in neutrinos? Is it carried away as gamma rays? ...
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1answer
169 views

Mass loss for Fusion energy? [closed]

I am thinking how you can estimate the mass loss of the fusion energy for 1 kWh. I think you cannot use Einstein's $E=mc^2$ to calculate the mass loss in the fusion reaction of the Sun. How can ...
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1answer
57 views

Characteristic Ka X-rays [closed]

In an experiment one observes the characteristic Ka X-rays of two elements at energies of 6.930 and 7.478 eV. The higher energy line is due to Ni. What element is responsible for the lower energy ...
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52 views

Positive/negative octupole moment of nuclei?

Does octupole moment of nuclear charge distribution show any positive/negative character, like the quadrupole moment does? Quadrupole moment has prolate and oblate types, but what about ...
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2answers
149 views

Why do heavy nuclei have half lives

Why do heavy nuclei have half-lives if they are unstable why do they take millions of years to break down in some cases why don't they simple do it instantly? What makes them stay together?
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148 views

Could I turn into a nuclear bomb?

Just out of curiousity, could the nuclei of our atoms split via quantum tunnelling, thereby leading to nuclear reactions and ultimately turning us into atomic bombs? I know that this is ...
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18 views

Modelling populations of GE isotopes

I asked a question similar to this here: What combination of stable GE isotopes make up the germanium in a Ge(Li) spectrometer And got some very good answers. This question is instead based on the ...
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19 views

What combination of stable GE isotopes make up the germanium in a Ge(Li) spectrometer

I work with a Ge(Li) gamma spectrometer. I'm trying to work out the different populations of stable Germanium isotopes in it. I'm trying to model the unrealistic scenario where none of these isotopes ...
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1answer
639 views

Why can't electrons be found inside the nucleus if there are infinite number of orbitals?

If there are an infinite number of orbitals, we can assume, that they can be present in any point in space. If that is correct, why do we not find electrons in the nucleus? I study in high school. ...
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1answer
22 views

Models for populations of decay products

I'm looking to create a population model for the specific nuclides in a neutron spallation source. The source is a target (Tantalum clad Tungsten) which is being bombarded with protons, and in turn is ...
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35 views

Nomenclature of nuclear excited states

I read in an online portal about $^{112}$Sn nucleus making a transition from $0_{g.s}^{+} \rightarrow 2_{1}^{+}$ state. Also, some higher excited states were named as $0_{2}^{+}$, $3_{1}^{-}$, etc. ...
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1answer
32 views

Notation on chart of the isotopes

I recently purchased a complete chart of the isotopes, (this one: https://shop.marktdienste.de/shoppages/produktuebersicht.aspx ) and have it on the wall next to me in work. The different coloured ...
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1answer
107 views

How does neutron reflection work?

What I mean here isn't what is it used for, but what's actually going on with the reflector. There are a lot of sub questions to this. how much energy is lost in the act of reflection. not ...
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40 views

Meaning of 'nuclear surface vibrations'?

Would like to know the meaning of nuclear surface vibrations as mentioned by Bohr in his paper titled 'The coupling of nuclear surface vibrations to the motion of individual nucleons'. The paper talks ...
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1answer
51 views

Oscillation of nucleons mediated by polarizing electron charge on opposite ends of the nucleus?

Assuming I have a nucleus and its known that there are nucleons inside its shell. Lets say I have an electron that alternates its position from the top of the nucleus to the opposite bottom, back and ...
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1answer
120 views

What would happen if you split an antimatter nucleus? [duplicate]

If we had the huge money required to make it, could it be used as a weapon more destructive than a regular nuclear bomb? Here it would undergo fission AND annihilate regular particles, so...?
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1answer
49 views

minimum hyperbolic distance for Rutherford Scattering

I saw in a textbook that gave the minimum distance for a hyperbolic trajectory in Rutherford scattering is given by $$r_{min}= ...
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2answers
2k views

How to detect a secret nuclear detonation here on the earth?

How can we know that North Korea and Iran (to name a few) are exploding nuclear weapons if no inspectors have ever been granted access to suspected nuclear sites in these countries? How can we ...
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2answers
119 views

How massive can an atom get?

After reading this thread, it appears to me that creating a new element is a game of chance some sort of an art. It also appeared to me that the higher you go, the harder it is to make an element. ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Doubly magic isotopes

I understand the definition of a magic number in nuclear physics to mean a number of either protons or neutrons to completely fill a nuclear shell. I see here the term "doubly magic" used for 78Ni: ...
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115 views

Gamma spectroscopy - Do annihilation photons produce a backscatter peak?

Below is a diagram of part of a structure which I find in a gamma spectrum taken from a hall in which a neutron source is undergoing spallation. The structure which I'm interested in can be seen ...
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44 views

Reading ensdf files

I understand that this is more of a computing question, but I still think the appropriate place to ask it is here. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files are on the internet, available for ...