Nuclear physics is the study of the composition, behavior and interaction of atomic nuclei and their constituent parts.

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landau distribution as a model of charge deposition in silicon detector

I am would like to know if it is any explanation why the charge collected by the detector can is model by the Landau distribution. Is it any deeper explanation instead of "it is working" ? I look ...
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104 views

Why is isospin so useful?

I'm currently reading about isospin in nuclear physics, and I know how to calculate it, and all the math, but I'm actually not sure WHY it is so useful? Can anyone come with some examples where not ...
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34 views

Will ionization energy be affected by screening effect?

It would be logical to think that the more electrons are ejected from an atom, the harder it is to eject more. I just learned about photoelectric effect experiment. The book is kinda telling me the ...
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Fermi's yield estimation of the Trinity Test [duplicate]

In Enrico Fermi's eyewitness account of the Trinity nuclear test in 1945, he gives a brief description of a method that he used to estimate the blast energy of the test: About 40 seconds after the ...
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1answer
107 views

Form factor for Proton

To find the charge distribution of proton , we study electron proton scattering and compute the form factor to find the cross section. The form factor comes out to be Fourier transform of charge ...
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1answer
120 views

Direct vs. Compound reactions

I know there are different types of direct reactions like inelastic scattering and such. But is the main difference between direct and compound reactions that one excites (Or at least can) the whole ...
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54 views

Ground state of 113Sn from shell model

The shell model predicts that the ground state of 113Sn with 63 neutrons would have J=5/2+. But the ground state is taken to be 1/2+. What is the reason behind that? Has it got something to do with ...
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197 views

Is a turbine the same thing as a motor?

Is a turbine the same thing as a motor? We know that water, wind and nuclear power plants rotate a turbine so is this turbine like a motor? I think we can generate electricity by rotating a motor too. ...
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305 views

Is a Plutonium gun-type atomic bomb really “impossible”?

I caught a pretty well done 2 hour documentary on atomic bomb history yesterday on the local PBS station. In it, they go over the paths taken for design of the first bombs, including the Thin Man ...
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47 views

One Pion Exchange Potential properties for a two-nucleon system

I'm going through my Nuclear Physics book, and has come across a section called "Properties of OPEP for the two-nucleon system". It start out by considering the n-p system in a singlet spin state ...
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90 views

Lead - Lithium = Gold?

In reference to this question about transmuting lead into gold, I'm looking for a correct, though magical, way to turn lead into gold. I'm not worried if it's possible to split off a lithium nucleus ...
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13 views

Where to get the AME2012 isotope mass table?

what's the official site for getting the latest isotope mass table, i.e., AME2012? All links I have found (NIST, IAEA) point me to a site at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, but the link ...
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201 views

In the Iranian nuclear deal, how can IAEA detect nuclear activity after 24 days?

This is a question related to current events, but I want to ask about the physics, which are not explained in any news article that I can find. Ernest Moniz and John Kerry wrote an op-ed in the ...
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158 views

When does electron capture occur and when does positron emission occur?

I’ve been told that electron capture occurs when there isn’t enough energy to produce a positron by beta plus decay. Exactly why is this the case? Why does it take more energy for positron emission ...
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53 views

Can an electron in an atom have insufficient energy to achieve an energy level, or orbital, and what happens to this electron when this occurs?

If a nucleus undergoes a change in Z or Mass due decay or absorption, could this disrupt the electrons from their orbital/shell energy levels? If so, could the electrons that were previously in the ...
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176 views

Pentaquark spin prediction

Is there a straightforward way to see what the spin of the recently-discovered pentaquark states should be, from the representation theory of $SU(3)\times SU(2)\subset SU(6)$? I can see that from the ...
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1answer
27 views

Is there a directional aspect to Beta decay dependant on nucleus orientation

Does beta decay occur in certain directions relative to a nucleus orientation? Would the nucleus geometry or spin direction have an impact? This effect could may be tested if a radioactive nucleus ...
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25 views

Effect of nucleus geometry and states on the Coulomb barrier and the electric potential well surrounding the nucleus

In some models of the nucleus it has a geometric aspect due to the combination and alignments of the charges, magnetic moments and spins of the protons and neutrons it contains. Even in models that ...
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18 views

Are Fe56 or Ni56 the fission products of any binary reactions?

I'm curious as to if there is some combination of a fusion and fission event simultaneously occuring that would only produce 56 nucleon number nuclides. Such that the net energy out of the fusion ...
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88 views

Binding energy and mass

I’ve been told that a greater binding energy means the nucleus is more tightly bound, and therefore that decreases the mass of the nucleus with respect to its nucleons when separated. But why does a ...
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1answer
43 views

Can a light element with excited nucleus undergo internal conversion

Internal conversion occurs when an excited nucleus ejects a low level electron from the first 2 low energy shells such as a k shell electron instead of emitting gamma when returning to ground state. ...
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88 views

Does the mass of a nucleus increase when it is excited to higher energy levels

If we consider an atomic nucleus that is excited to a higher energy level. This maybe due to absorption of gamma for example or as a result of some other decay or interaction. Would the mass of that ...
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3answers
365 views

Why are heavier nuclei unstable?

If you have more neutrons than protons, then there will be more strong force present to counteract the repulsive forces between protons. Why is it that above bismuth, no nucleus is stable, regardless ...
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115 views

Using particle accelerators for nuclear fusion [duplicate]

Apologies this is probably a stupid idea but I am curious and my knowledge of physics is limited as I am 14. So I was wondering if we could use particle accelerators to achieve nuclear fusion. I have ...
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142 views

Textbook for learning nuclear physics

I've taken a college level course on nuclear physics. Though the course was titled "Nuclear and Particle Physics," almost nothing about elementary particles had been taught. I'm on vacation now, and ...
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137 views

Effect on electron shells energy levels during nuclear decay

First thanks for this great site. I was recently looking at photon emission from electron transitions from excited electron states in atoms. For simplicity I was using the Rutherford Bohr Model and ...
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Is the spontaneous fission-yield curve for 240Pu known?

I have not seen any data for the isotopes produced by spontaneous fission of plutonium. I believe this will be dominated by 240Pu as the major even-numbered isotope produced in reactor operations. I ...
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Reaction of uranium and neutrons emits neutrons, or is it photons?

So we had this test in nuclears physics today, and part of one of the quesitons was the following: When $\rm U^{235}_{92}$ nuclides are bombarded with one neutron, they can decompose to krypton ...
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35 views

Collision between electrons & nucleus [duplicate]

I am new with physics and I have a confusion that since electron and nucleus has opposite charges then why they do not collide with each other inside an atom?
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23 views

Giant dipole resonance

Could anyone explain in simple words what exactly is meant by GDR? What does giant imply? I have read about collective excitations and am also familiar with the multipolar form of the charge ...
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1answer
275 views

What's the idea behind Wu's experiment?

Madame Wu discovered the parity violation in beta-decays. To do so, she took some Co-60 nuclei, which decay via beta-decay in Ni-60 with emission of electron, antineutrino and 2 gamma rays. She ...
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58 views

Why do elements on the Binding Energy per Nuclear Molecule after Iron (most stable) even form?

So I was reading about the stability of elements based on Nuclear Binding Energy, and I saw that the 'Iron group' of elements were most tightly bound and hence most stable, and that is why the graph ...
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116 views

Total energy of neutrons and protons

In a stable nucleus, are the total energies of neutrons and protons same?
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32 views

What is a “cut” in the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT) method?

I am currently working on p-p collisions simulations using PYTHIA 6. I am using a Monte Carlo approach, but I have done mass reconstructions in the past using something very similar to the ...
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Distribution of fragments in fission reactions

What decides the mass and charge distribution of fission fragments? are these factors decided at or before the saddle point? and how? Why does the valley in the distribution function become shallow on ...
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106 views

Free neutrons in the sun's core?

In the standard description of proton-proton fusion, the first step of the interaction proceeds through the unbound diproton $\rm^2He$: $$ \begin{aligned} \rm p + p &\to \rm {}^2He^* \\ \rm ^2He^* ...
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55 views

How to derive the Gamow factor in the simplest way?

I want to know how to derive the Gamow factor (how to solve the integral and which approximation I have to do) without the centrifugal correction. $$V(r) = V_N(r)+V_c(r). $$ The Gamow factor is ...
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600 views

Why is the energy spectrum of alpha decay discrete?

Are the other peaks with lower energy caused by the possibility that daughter nuclei have to be in excited states?as show in this link (count versus energy)
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1answer
83 views

Deformation parameters of a nucleus

How are the deformation parameters (quadrupole, hexadecapole etc) of a nucleus mathematically related to the reduced transition probabilities $B(El)$ values obtained experimentally?
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Multipole expansion of Woods-Saxon potential?

When can a distribution be expanded in multipoles? What is the basic requirement? Can it be done for a potential like the Woods-Saxon form?
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Decay chain governed by first long-lived particle?

Suppose we have a decay chain reaction A->B->C-> ....Z Why is it a good assumption that the decay rate of all species in the chain is governed by the rate of the first long-lived one? Suppose B -> C ...
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108 views

What is the heaviest stable element in the center of the sun due to Photodisintegration?

Source that got me curious (page 5): http://astro1.physics.utoledo.edu/~megeath/ph6820/lecture27_ph6820.pdf High energy photons can cause larger, less stable elements to undergo fission. Uranium ...
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81 views

Why do nuclear multipole moments of charge density vary with isotopes?

Why do some isotopes have different quadrupole/octupole moments, when these moments of charge density should be independent of mass?
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Nuclear shapes and deformation

How do the experimentally measured multipole moments (static or transition) give information about the deformed nuclear shape? Since deformation is not directly observable, the only information we get ...
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182 views

Spin, isospin, parity etc. in nuclear physics

I have one question regarding these quantum numbers. When I read through my textbook, it sometimes just says something like: "And this atoms ground state has $J^{\pi} = 0^+$ and isospin $+1$" - as an ...
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When an atom is split, what form of energy is released?

When an atom is split, what form of energy is released? All of the websites I have looked at say there is a lot of energy released when an atom is split, but it never says what form of energy it is ...
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60 views

Why should odd-ordered electric multipole moments vanish?

In the multipole expansion of the radiation field of a nuclear, it is considered that the odd-ordered poles (like electric octupole) must vanish in order to conserve parity. But there exist many ...
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359 views

Why is the excited state of 116 Indium more stable than ground state?

Why is the excited state of 116 Indium more stable than ground state? Both undergo beta decay, but the ground state has a half-life of 14 seconds, while the excited state has a half-life of 54 ...
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56 views

Gamma decay with lowest energy?

What is the (by current knowledge) least energetic example of a gamma decay into the nuclear ground state? I am only considering degrees of freedom of the nucleons, i.e. without the electrons. (I ...
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179 views

Feynman-Bethe Critical Mass Formula

According to the historical lore of the making of the atomic bomb at Los Alamos, Richard Feynman and Hans Bethe supposedly worked out a formula for the critical mass for the core of the A-bomb. Is it ...