Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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Relative Kinetic Energy on Two Sides of a Spring

There is a massless spring on a frictionless surface with two objects, $A$ with mass $m$ and $B$ with mass $M$, attached to the ends of the spring. Both objects are pulled and held at a position where ...
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1answer
24 views

Calculating velocity based on applied force

If I have a block sitting on a spring, ignoring air resistance, with 45N of stored elastic energy in the spring, and the block weighs 500g, what would be the process for calculating its maximum ...
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1answer
81 views

When will the Earth stop rotating?

I looked up leap second in Wikipedia. It is a second added (usually) to clocks to keep them in sync with the atomic clock. It said that 25 leap seconds were added in the last 43 years and that none ...
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2answers
178 views

Correct terminology for combined kinematic and dynamic state

The kinematic state is defined as the position and orientation in space. The dynamic state is defined as the associated velocities. What is the correct terminology for the combined kinematic and ...
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2answers
51 views

Mathematics of simplified air resistance

I recently encountered a problem in which when throwing a ball upwards one has to determine whether it goes up or comes down faster when not only was gravity to be considered, but also air resistance ...
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0answers
29 views

Two solutions, A+ and A-, for masses connected via springs

My prof gives an example of trying to solve the equations of motion for a series of gliders each connected by springs, with the same spring constant. From looking at the $j-1$ through $j+1$ glider, he ...
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2answers
89 views

Can the coefficient of friction be derived from fundamentals?

It is common to want to derive macroscopic laws from what we know microscopically - after all, given a (correct) microscopic description, everything larger should follow. Has it ever been done to ...
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1answer
281 views

Block Sliding Down a Plane (Perpendicular Velocity)

I'm having trouble understand the concepts for this problem. Here's the problem: A block is placed on a plane inclined at angle $\theta$. The coefficient of friction between the block and the ...
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3answers
92 views

Two questions about the coefficient of restitution

If you were to drop a ball onto a surface from a height $h$ and the ball collided with the surface and then rebounded, would the ball then travel a distance of $eh$ back up from the surface where $e$ ...
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1answer
202 views

Is gravitation really a conservative force?

A spinning gyroscope has a rigidity in space. That means it maintains its axis in relation to space – and not to the surface of the earth: Imagine a spinning gyroscope that is freely mounted in ...
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1answer
90 views

Quantum violation of Newton's Third Law? [on hold]

From this site: http://www.learning-mind.com/5-thought-provoking-quantum-experiments-showing-that-reality-is-an-illusion/ I gained the knowledge that a group of scientists, upon measuring a tiny ...
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1answer
29 views

A Question on Friction [on hold]

And yes, this is not a homework thing.Here's my working.
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4answers
507 views

Confused about Newton's 3rd law

I am confused about Newton's 3rd Law. If a person jumps off the ground a force is applied both to the person and to the ground. However, as $F=ma$ acceleration experienced by the Earth is much less ...
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1answer
23 views

Finding radius of turning car to calculate the centripital force

I'm writing a program to simulate a car driving. I'm wondering how I should find the radius when calculating the centripital force. If we let the car travel at a constant speed, then $F_{net} = ...
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0answers
29 views

Initial position and velocity given, force given. Find the trajectory of the particle [on hold]

If a particle of mass m at time t=0 has velocity v = u j position r = -a i Force acting on the particle is F = $-(mv^2/a)$(R/R) (R is the position vector, v is the velocity vector) Find the ...
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2answers
84 views

Computing distance traveled from jerk

When dealing with higher time derivatives like jerk, how does one find the distance traveled? Can it be calculated by just knowing time?
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3answers
112 views

In general relativity, how do we think of Newton's third law for gravity?

In GR everything become geometric, gravity becomes curvature in spacetime. How do we think of Newton's third law in the context of GR? What corresponds to action and what to reaction?
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1answer
23 views

Acceleration of a system [on hold]

I worked out this problem that has two masses and and pulley with one mass hanging and the other sliding across a surface and I had to solve for the systems acceleration. Can someone tell me if I did ...
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1answer
30 views

Pendulum at an angle

A pendulum has a period of $T$ when swinging from a string. The pendulum is now placed on a frictionless incline at a 30 degree angle. What is the new period of the pendulum?
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1answer
32 views

Where do forces point in an equilibrium system

I have the system above, with three identical balls of weight $W$ and radius $r$. The angle joining the centres is $\theta$, and the coefficient of friction between the balls and the plane is $\mu$ ...
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2answers
1k views

Different directions of frictional force when objects are rolling

My textbook has two instances of rolling bodies (smooth rolling). In the first, the body is rolling on the horizontal floor with some acceleration of its centre of mass. In this case, the book says ...
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5answers
8k views

Why can't a rope be pulled completely straight?

I have found several discussions on how to calculate the sag of rope that is tied off at two points (like a tightrope), and I understand it to a certain extent. What I can't wrap my head around is how ...
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1answer
290 views

Walking and Friction

If walking is a result of the reaction to a kick backwards to the ground (reaction being friction), it appears that it should be true that the kick will have to be less than the kinetic friction ...
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0answers
22 views

Torque due to non-uniform force [on hold]

Suppose a non-uniform force, varying along with the distance, is acting normally on the surface of a rod hinged at the mid point. The force varies along the length of the rod, i.e as we go down along ...
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2answers
31 views

If I flex my arm, where is the “equal and opposite” reaction?

In my sight, nothing happens at all. Is the opposite reaction pressure applied to my bones? It certainly seems so; however, since I flex my arms in a curve, shouldn't the opposite reaction direction ...
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1answer
40 views

Why, in a car taking a sloped curve, friction is perpendicular to the car

In solving the problem we usually use the friction as the centripetal force, but I could never understood how is this possible. I understand that if a car is making a circular motion, some centripetal ...
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6answers
743 views

Why is momentum conserved (or rather what makes an object carry on moving infinitely)?

I know this is an incredibly simple question, but I am trying to find a very simple explanation to this other than the simple logic that energy is conserved when two items impact and bounce off each ...
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0answers
23 views

Why does kinetic energy quadruple when speed doubles? [duplicate]

Why does kinetic energy quadruple when speed doubles? Please explain (in simple terms) with examples if possible.
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1answer
42 views

Kettlebell squats center of mass

I should, first of all, state that I have very limited knowledge of physics but as a fitness enthusiast the following question has puzzled me for a while. When I do squats on the gym holding a ...
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1answer
73 views

How can we use the distances? [on hold]

How can we calculate $F_{H}, F_{Z}, s$ at the following picture ?? I am confused because of the distances. How can we use them?? EDIT: Does the following stand?? $$s=(\text{Number of ropes})*h$$ ...
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2answers
83 views

Why does a reaction force still allow the thing exerting the force to move?

A $5$ kg and a $10$ kg box are touching each other. A $45N$ horizontal force is applied to the $5$kg box in order to accelerate both boxes across the floor. Ignore friction forces and ...
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0answers
9 views

Does the force of releasing the latch of a spring-latch contraption affects the force generated by the spring?

There is this contraption in my class, where a rod is attached to a latch and a spring. By pulling the latch back behind a piece of metal, the latch is secured, the rod if pulled back and the spring ...
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1answer
94 views

You are trapped on a frictionless sheet of ice. Can you escape by inhaling in one direction, then exhaling in the opposite direction?

You are trapped on a frictionless sheet of ice. If you trued to escape by blowing, you would have to inhale eventually, which would counteract the force you gained by blowing. However, if you were to ...
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1answer
59 views

Feynman Lectures: Resonance - Problem with Formula

I am reading Volume 1 Chapter 23 of FLP, and I have come across something rather strange. Feynman says that: $$ \rho^2 =\frac{1}{m^2[(\omega^2-\omega_0^2)^2+\gamma^2\omega^2]} $$ A graph of this can ...
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2answers
66 views

Which of these two forces is stronger: static friction or kinetic friction? [duplicate]

Which of these two forces is stronger: The force of static friction or the force of kinetic friction? I am having a hard time understanding this concept of friction, so please explain your answer!
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0answers
26 views

$\mathbf{P}=M\mathbf{v}_{cm}$ for a continuous body?

While restudying some fundamental concepts with greater attention, I have reflected on the following deduction, which I find in my book of mechanics, of the identity of the temporal derivative ...
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2answers
23 views

Risk assessment for ablation of Earth-collision course object

I have seen articles dismissing fragmentation of an incoming Earth-colliding object as too risky because of resulting collisions of smaller resulting pieces. What would be the adverse effect of ...
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4answers
872 views

When pressure is exerted on parallel hydraulic pistons, do they start extending at the same time?

If there are two hydraulic cylinders connected in parallel, each with a different load (shown in the picture below), will they start extending at the same time? I'm having a disagreement with my ...
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0answers
28 views

Block + Rod + 3 spring system (SHM) [on hold]

Mass m is placed on the midpoint of the rod. Find effective spring constant K(SHM) . I got stuck somewhere and am getting a wrong answer. Can someone please help me out? Answer : K(SHM) = (4*k1*k2 ...
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3answers
9k views

About an upside down cup of water against atmosphere pressure

There is an experiment we learned from high school that demonstrated how atmosphere pressure worked. Fill a cup of water and put a cardboard on top of it, then turn it upside-down, the water will not ...
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0answers
17 views

Finding the maximal extension of a string on a slope [on hold]

Suppose we have a light string of natural length $l$ and modulus of elasticity $Y$ attached to a fixed point ,$A$. on a plane inclined at an angle $a$ to the horizontal. Let the other end of the ...
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1answer
41 views

Rigid body: internal work null?

I am following an elementary physics course book, namely W.E. Gettys, F.J. Keller and M.J. Skove's Physics (in an Italian translation). In exercises where no non-conservative force acts on a rigid ...
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3answers
72 views

Why can't I harness normal force?

Lets say I have my palm flat with a book resting on top of it, and I have my feet on the ground. I extend my arm so that now it's kind of difficult to keep the book up. Why doesn't my hand just ...
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3answers
71 views

Time period related to acceleration due to gravity

The period of a pendulum is given by $$ T = 2\pi \sqrt{\frac{L}{g}}. $$ If we take a pendulum where there is no gravitational field, then $g=0$, therefore the period should become infinity. In such a ...
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1answer
56 views

A moving brush on a vibrating surface

Hi group, I am a HS student in China preparing for a regional Young Physicist Tournament even. We are very puzzled about why would there be such movement. We would be grateful to see any inspiring ...
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3answers
94 views

How is a ballistic pendulum affected by two objects with different mass?

Imagine that bullet A (made of lead) has twice the mass of bullet B It is shot at the same muzzle velocity as bullet B onto a ballistic pendulum; all other initial variables are the same: size and ...
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0answers
28 views

force required at piston [closed]

Mechanics module: Please see attached drawing. This is a portable hydraulic cutter for rescue teams with 2 cylinders. I have only drawn one side for clarity. The hydraulic cylinder is pinned at the ...
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0answers
44 views

Total angular momentum of a continuous body

I find the definition of total angular momentum $\mathbf{L}$ of a system of $n$ material points with respect to a given point $Q$ as the sum of the momenta $\ell_i=\mathbf{r}_i\times\mathbf{p}_i$ ...
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0answers
32 views

The behaviour that saves more energy/ petrol when driving down-up-hill [closed]

This question is in a way a follow-up of this one: Can a car get better mileage driving over hills?, it is similar to that, is no engineering question and is in no way a homework problem, I'd like you ...
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1answer
41 views

Normal force on a banked road & why it's larger than the gravitational force here

Please read this: http://www.askiitians.com/iit-jee-physics/mechanics/banking-of-roads.aspx From my understanding of normal forces, they are a reaction to gravitational or other forces. When a force ...