Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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Why does linear momentum change in this problem?

I found this problem in a Irodov's book. It's asked to find the momentum increment of the bullet-rod system. I wonder why the system momentum changes. They argue this: The bullet-rod system is ...
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1answer
72 views

What is the velocity of Sun due to Earth alone?

If Earth and Sun were in a isolated system, will the Earth's motion around Sun will be similar? What will be Sun's and Earth's velocity when Earth is at its aphelion? Please note that it's not a ...
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1answer
45 views

Particle hitting particles attached with springs [closed]

In classical mechanics if you have a particle moving in two dimensions and it hits a particle at rest although that particle is attached to a spring that is in turn attached to a third particle. ...
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1answer
315 views

How to calculate distance travelled while car is rolling, given start and end speed?

I'm trying to calculate the distance travelled by my Formula Student racecar if it starts at a certain speed, goes into Neutral (no acceleration, no brakes, just rolling on its wheels), and ends at ...
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1answer
154 views

How to find Tangential/Radial/Angular Velocity for motion in any curve?

Is the radial velocity responsible only for changing distance between objects and the component perpendicular to it only for change in direction ? If so why ? Please try to give a different ...
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1answer
85 views

How may one calculate the escape velocity of a binary system at a given radius from the COM?

Apologies if this is a bit general, even some pointers in the right direction would be great (reading material etc.) Given an object of mass $m_3$ travelling outward at speed $v$ from the centre of ...
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1answer
86 views

What is the acceleration due to Earth's rotational and orbital movements?

What are the accelerations due to earths spin and orbital motion around the sun? It must be negligible otherwise humans would have been feeling it, are there any instruments that can measure it? would ...
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2answers
73 views

Gravity effect on moving bodies

If we imagine two suns of equal mass, and a small object in their combined center of gravity, which is not moving, it will stay there forever. If the object is displaced a little bit towards one of ...
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1answer
88 views

Cube bouncing off a wall

An elastic cube sliding without friction along a horizontal floor hits a vertical wall with one of its faces parallel to the wall. The coefficient of friction between the wall and the cube is ...
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2answers
129 views

Connection between moment/torque and centre of gravity?

So I understand how moments work with regards to basic examples like pushing a door, in that the further you are away from the hinges of the door, the greater the moment, which is like a turning ...
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1answer
50 views

How is the kinetic energy of the wind transferred onto a lift based wind turbine?

The rotor blades of a lift based wind turbine are shaped like airfoils, so the wind flowing around them creates a lift force which in turn moves them around. From a thermodynamic viewpoint and like ...
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1answer
187 views

Minimum energy required to roll a cuboid through $90^\circ$ [closed]

I'm stuck on this textbook question about the minimum energy required to roll a cuboid through $90^\circ$ from an upright position to a horizontal position (see image). I believe the correct answer is ...
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3answers
106 views

Confused by answer to mechanics question [closed]

I am confused by the answer to this question. Well, I am trying to explain my thought process about this. I used net energy in the system to calculate the maximum speed. So I assume at max velocity, ...
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1answer
53 views

Does Earth also move due to some electrostatic forces?

Does the earth experience some electrostatic forces due to other planets...which also make it move? My question is..whether the earth also moves due to electrostatic force of attraction or only due ...
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1answer
49 views

Definition of Force Using Momentum

When we use F = change in momentum / change in time, is that the average force applied? There could be different magnitudes of force applied over time to change the momentum (it could be instantaneous ...
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2answers
112 views

Why does a reaction force still allow the thing exerting the force to move?

A $5$ kg and a $10$ kg box are touching each other. A $45N$ horizontal force is applied to the $5$kg box in order to accelerate both boxes across the floor. Ignore friction forces and ...
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1answer
70 views

Normal force on a banked road & why it's larger than the gravitational force here

Please read this: http://www.askiitians.com/iit-jee-physics/mechanics/banking-of-roads.aspx From my understanding of normal forces, they are a reaction to gravitational or other forces. When a force ...
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1answer
77 views

Circular motion from rest [closed]

A particle $P$ is suspended from a fixed point $O$ by a light string of length $a$. When hanging at rest under gravity at $A$ it is given a horizontal velocity $u$. The particle moves freely in a ...
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1answer
262 views

A moving brush on a vibrating surface

Hi group, I am a HS student in China preparing for a regional Young Physicist Tournament even. We are very puzzled about why would there be such movement. We would be grateful to see any inspiring ...
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1answer
130 views

What causes angular and linear deceleration in a sliding and rotating ring?

I was solving an AP Physics problem involving a ring sliding and rotating over a frictional surface. When I started to think about why the ring eventually comes to a stop I started to become confused. ...
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2answers
106 views

Does air density influence a football player's ability to “bend” the ball?

Whilst reading an article on nasa.gov, there was a claim that I found interesting: At higher altitudes, the density r is lower producing a larger radius of curvature and a straighter path. The ...
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2answers
115 views

Clarify an assertion on torques from the Feynman lectures

In The Feynman Lectures, vol.I, chapter 18, Feynman discusses torques on a rigid body in two dimensions and says: Now we pause briefly to note that our foregoing introduction of torque, through ...
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1answer
123 views

Exam review problem. Weird answer [closed]

The question asks us to calculate the holding force of the triangular mounting if the rock weighs exactly $2kg$ and the mounting supports the rod at exactly $\frac{1}{4}$ of its length. ($g=9.81 ...
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1answer
229 views

Difference between kilogram-force and kilogram

I know that a 1 kilogram-force is the force of 1 kilogram acted upon by 1 standard unit of gravity (9.80665 m/s^2). However, in torque descriptions I find that some use $kgf*cm$ while others use ...
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1answer
90 views

Coriolis force: why is pole-to-equator air flow eastly?

I have little knowledge in fluid dynamics, so this may be naive. But I have a question while reading a textbook about the Coriolis force, by which the rotation of the earth from west to east changes ...
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1answer
165 views

mechanics problem: rope on a fictionless table through a hole

The problem is from "An introduction to Mechanics" by Daniel Kleppner and Robert Kolenkow. The book has a second edition, and the problem is not changed. The number of the problem is 4.16 in second ...
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1answer
65 views

Problem about a spring which oscillates due to a external force [closed]

A person holds a spring of stiffness $k= 80$ N/m by its extremity A; In the other end there is a mass of $0.5$ kg. The spring is initially at equilibrium, when the person starts to shake the ...
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1answer
30 views

Stair well descent

I am trying to understand the science behind lowering a person down a flight of stairs on a sled. My tensile strength only says it can hold 250 pounds but I have seen it lower people that weigh 300 ...
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1answer
93 views

Is this the reason why acceleration is said absolute?

I've seem sometimes people saying that although uniform motion on a straight line cannot be detected and hence it is not absolute, acceleration is indeed absolute in Classical Mechanics (I don't know ...
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1answer
121 views

Can Tension between two blocks on a horizontal plane be discovered in these conditions? [closed]

the bodies are linked by an ideal string, one has m1=10kg & the other m2=20kg The force is known and is pulling horizontally, F=60N on the lighter object the coefficient of friction is said to be the ...
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3answers
303 views

Two questions about the coefficient of restitution

If you were to drop a ball onto a surface from a height $h$ and the ball collided with the surface and then rebounded, would the ball then travel a distance of $eh$ back up from the surface where $e$ ...
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1answer
193 views

Kinetic and rotational kinetic energy

When a body is rotating on its own axis, and at the same time it is moving, does it possess both KE and RKE? So consider the case of the moon. The moon rotates on its own axis, and at the same time ...
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2answers
47 views

Why doesn't $x$ reach a constant for a block experiencing $v^n$ resistive force? [closed]

I am stuck on the Exercise 3.5 of Newtonian Dynamics by R. Fitzpatrick: A block of mass $m$ slides along a horizontal surface which is lubricated with heavy oil such that the block suffers a ...
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1answer
98 views

Do we need Escape Velocity [duplicate]

This may seem silly a lot but I really need some clarification on the necessity of escape velocity for a rocket leaving the Earth's gravity. A stone thrown vertically upwards reaches to a certain ...
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3answers
397 views

On the definition of elastic restoring force in a spring

How is the elastic restoring force defined exactly for a spring? We know by Hooke's law that $$F_\text{restoring} = -kx$$ but what does $F_\text{restoring}$ really mean? I thought up till now that ...
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2answers
130 views

Working out velocity (including air resistance) [duplicate]

For my computing project, I am creating a projectile simulator but I cant seem to get my head round the air resistance. I tried by working out the horizontal and vertical velocity by solving it ...
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3answers
8k views

How to find stopping distance of a car? [closed]

I am trying to calculate minimum stopping distance of a car once the brakes are applied. I know the velocity at braking instant, i also know the distance from the obstacle. I found out that $$ d = ...
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2answers
349 views

What is causing the normal force in circular motion?

In the picture, at point 2 (the bottom of the ramp) the normal force of the object has a greater magnitude than weight. I understand that the normal force has to be greater than the weight since the ...
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1answer
85 views

Determine the value of $g$ with rolling ball

At first, I thought the value of $g$ ($9.8m/s^2$) could be determined simply by placing a ball at the top of a ramp at a known height. The ball was released with no initial velocity, and the final ...
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1answer
161 views

When do we assume that a rope has different tensions in different places?

Working a problem with 2 pulleys and masses in class this week the professor at one point assumed that the tension on the two sides of a pulley would be different. Every other time we've done a ...
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4answers
139 views

Conservation of energy, and Newtonian physics that does not fit

Here is a theoretical example where the energy into the system does not mach the energy output. There is no friction or air resistance. A sledge with a rocket engine attached to it is lying still on ...
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1answer
64 views

Pendulum forces in orbit

On Earth a pendulum is governed by a set of equations, relating the angle of the swing, the mass etc. However with a pendulum in orbit there is no fixed point (assume 2 masses attached via a string). ...
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1answer
81 views

Prove thrust is double the dynamic pressure across a nozzle

I'm trying to teach myself some of the content from 'Rocket Propulsion Elements' by George P. Sutton. After reading over the first couple of chapters feeling like I understood everything, I came ...
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1answer
374 views

Conservation of energy during rolling without slipping?

Say there's a cylinder laying on a flat surface, and the surface is rested on frictionless ice. Attached to the surface is an engine that is attached via a string to the center of the cylinder, and ...
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3answers
83 views

What happens to KE when lowering a raised book?

I understand the conservation of energy theorem and mechanical energy, but there is this question that confused me a bit, so I hope someone explains it. If you had a book and you raised it, you gave ...
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1answer
166 views

Balancing sphere

A cube is balanced on the very top of a sphere, and is given a small push in some direction, at which point it begins sliding down that side of the cube (due to gravity). Now, I want to keep the cube ...
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1answer
164 views

Circular motion normal force

Extracted from this article (see the bottom section): Some roller-coasters have loop-the-loop sections, where you travel in a vertical circle, so that you're upside-down at the top. To do this ...
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3answers
268 views

Is the work-energy theorem valid for only particles or rigid bodies as well?

Is the work-energy theorem valid for only particles or rigid bodies as well? Most places where I have read this seem to claim the latter. But an example I thought up has been troubling me. Consider ...
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41 views

Acceleration in a system equal for every body — why?

A 1 kg cart can slide frictionlessly on the table. The black weights each weigh 1 kg. The pulleys are frictionless. The task is to determine the acceleration of the cart. For the left-most ...
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1answer
118 views

Is the moment-curvature relation for an elastic beam general?

The relationship between the moment and the curvature for an elastic beam is $$M = -EI\kappa$$ Previously, I have only used this with small deflections in static calculations. I am currently working ...