Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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How to understand tedious tension questions

A rope is wrapped $M$ whole turns round a cylindrical post, the two ends of the rope going in opposite directions. The coefficient of the friction between rope and post is 0.25. It is desired that by ...
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241 views

Particle constrained to move in a sphere? [closed]

A particle of mass $m$ rests on the top of a smooth (frictionless) sphere of radius $R$. The particle is disturbed very slightly so that it starts to slide off the sphere, and its position can e ...
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231 views

Is torque still a vector in 2 Dimensions?

In 3D, torque is defined as $\vec{r} \times \vec{F}$ which is a vector, therefore having both a direction perpendicular to the plane of $\vec{F}$ and $\vec{r}$ and a magnitude of $\text{F}\cdot\text{r}...
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How is the final velocity in 2 body collision distributed between the 2 bodies?

Suppose 2 sphere of mass 1Kg move with velocity 5m/s and 10m/s in same direction. Let us call the ball moving with 5m/s blue and other one red with blue ahead of red from origin. Initial KE of Blue = ...
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66 views

On the connection between forces and the principle of stationary action

Feynman tries to account for the relation between the principle of stationary action, which is a statement about the whole path of a particle, and Newton's second law, which is a statement about the ...
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Very confused about effective spring constant

I know that for springs in parallel, the effective spring constant is $k_1+k_2$ and for springs in series the constant is $1/(1/k_1+1/k_2)$. But there are some weird problems where finding the ...
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Can all the theorems of classical mechanics be deduced from Newton's laws?

As above, is the whole edifice of Newtonian mechanics built upon Newton's three laws of motion? Can I deduce all the theorems without referring to further assumptions?
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210 views

Figure out the force constant of a spring [closed]

You are asked to design spring bumpers for the walls of a parking garage. A freely rolling 1200-kg var moving at 0.65m/s is to compress the spring no more than 0.090m before stopping. What should be ...
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283 views

Drag force - dimensional analysis

I have tried the following example from the link: MIT OCW 8.012 PS1 It is about dimensional analysis. Derive an expression for the drag force on a ball of radius $R$ and mass $M$ moving with ...
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2answers
3k views

Why are tensions in the pulley different when the pulley has a mass or moment of inertia?

When two blocks are connected by a string passing over a pulley whose moment of inertia is given (means pulley is not massless) then why does the string not have same tensions?
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10answers
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How to explain independence of momentum and energy conservation in elementary terms?

I'm trying to explain to someone learning elementary physics (16 year old) that linear momentum and energy are conserved independently. I'm not a professional physicist and haven't tried to explain ...
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3answers
267 views

Why is moment of inertia for a point same as a ring

The moment of inertia of a point and ring are both $m R^2$. It is interesting that the formula for moment of inertia is exactly the same for both. Is there any physical reason why this is the case? I ...
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347 views

Is it true that spring has more force acting on it at its positive maximum amplitude than than at the negative one?

Am I missing something? It seems obvious to me that at $+A$ and $-A$, the spring has restorative forces equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. But since gravity is always pulling it down, ...
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1answer
105 views

Slingshot Energy into traveled distance [closed]

If I have a slingshot and I am told that when pulled it has about $E$ joules of energy, how do I compute the height at which an object of mass $m$ would travel if the slingshot is released in the ...
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5answers
278 views

What happens to the kinetic energy of a dropped ball when it comes to rest on the ground?

If we want to drop a ball from a height, we calculated that potential energy at bottom is zero and we say it is converted into kinetic energy. At that movement, if it is a kind of sand, we find it ...
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5answers
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How can I determine whether the mass of an object is evenly distributed?

How can I determine whether the mass of an object is evenly distributed without doing any permanent damage? Suppose I got all the typical lab equipment. I guess I can calculate its center of mass and ...
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6answers
3k views

Conical train wheels

I've been reading about how the conical shape of train wheels helps trains round turns without a differential. For those who are unfamiliar with the idea, the conical shape allows the wheels to shift ...
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1answer
168 views

What makes us twist in a somersault?

In a backwards straight somersault you can decide whether you twist early or late. Twisting early means, that you induce the twisting movement before you rotatation hits 180° and twisting late means, ...
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1answer
88 views

When we ride a bicycle, why do we tend to move left when we turn it right? [duplicate]

When we ride a bicycle, we tend to move our body left if we are taking a right turn and vice versa. Why is it like that?
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2answers
128 views

Why do cylinders roll easily and not square or rectangular slabs? [duplicate]

Why do cylinders roll easily and not square or rectangular slabs?? Let us say both have same materiel and vertical dimensions? What is the reason for the slab always tends to slide?
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2answers
76 views

Intitutive meaning the unit of Force $N$

I infer 1 Newton of force = 1 kg.m/ sec squared means a force if acting continuosly on a body at rest would make it gain an acceleration of 1 m/sec squared each second.So the change in velocity is 1-0 ...
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3answers
166 views

Reaction Force on String Wrapped Around Circular Peg

A massless inextensible string is wrapped around a frictionless circular peg. The string is taut, with tension $T_2$ and $T_1$ at the points where it leaves of the pg as shown. The segment wrapped ...
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2answers
112 views

When is work done on or by something?

An example, here what my textbook says: When charges are released In electric fields charges experience the force causing them to accelerate along electric field vectors. Positive charges ...
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2answers
863 views

Why are force, momentum, and kinetic energy derivatives of each other [closed]

Force $ma$ is the rate of change of momentum, or the derivative of momentum with respect to time $$\frac{d}{dt} mv = ma = F$$. Kinetic energy is the integral of momentum with respect to velocity: $$\...
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1answer
97 views

Can forces in N be thought of as a length? [closed]

A solid uniform 45.0 kg ball of diameter 32.0 cm is supported against a vertical friction-less wall using a thin 30 cm wire of negligible mass. (a)make a free body diagram for the ball and use it to ...
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2answers
200 views

Does the outflowing water create a thrust on the bucket?

Let's consider the the bucket with water, which has a small hole at the bottom. Let the bucket lift up with a constant force $\vec F$. Water in the bucket, of course, flows out of it. Questions are ...
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2answers
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Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
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7answers
898 views

Free fall into circular motion

If I'm on a roller coaster free falling from height $h$ and then suddenly start going into horizontal motion with a radius $r$ of turn what is the $g$-force I experience? I worked out the equation ...
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3answers
2k views

In general, why do smaller guns have more felt recoil?

Why is recoil easier to control on a more massive gun compared to a smaller gun with the same bullet. Presumably the bullet leaves both guns with the same momentum, but the larger gun seems easier to ...
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1answer
119 views

Can mass-less spring system be solved?

Suppose we have typical chain of strings with masses, attached to the walls (W) at each side W-----m-----m--------W x=0 x=6 x=12 x=21 So if we let ...
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2answers
2k views

How to solve this pendulum problem using kinematics, not the principles of conservation of energy?

I have this question, because typically problems that can be solve using conservation of energy or just energy-related principles, can usually be solved sing kinematic equations. (At least is what I ...
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3answers
159 views

Isn't a physical frame of reference useless for calculating speed? [closed]

Please ignore relativistic effects and the effects of the expansion of space-time due to the expanding universe theory for the purposes of this question. Whenever someone asks what is the speed of X, ...
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1answer
177 views

What is force of static and kinetic friction? [closed]

While I am asking more than one question in this thread they are all small concept tests that you can answer with a yes or no, and is all related to me understanding kinetic and static friction. ...
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61 views

When will a ball running between two downwards slopes stop going back and forth?

Two angles $a$ and $b$ meet at a point, making an angle $c$ between them. $a$ and $b$ are all $0 < \theta < π/2$. $c$ is $π/2 < \theta < π$ $a$ is to the left and opens to the left, $b$ ...
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294 views

How does the Pluto-Charon orbital 'dance' affect Pluto's elliptical orbit around the Sun?

Like many Scientists (and people in general), I have been watching the New Horizons mission results with great interest. One aspect in particular caught my attention - the Pluto-Charon orbital 'dance'...
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1answer
314 views

Confused about elasticity and collisions

I was solving the following problem and the explanation to it confused me. There are two objects with mass $m$ and $M$, respectively. The object with mass $m$ has a velocity of $\sqrt{2gl}$ and ...
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2answers
128 views

Tension in a massless string as it bends around a concave shape

I understand that tension in a massless string must be the same throughout when the string is straight, to prevent any section of it from accelerating at an infinite rate. However, I fail to see how ...
4
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1answer
157 views

Finding minimum time to raise a bucket

First of all, I wonder: in $F=ma$ does the acceleration have to be constant? I believe so but, just as confirmation. Problem: A 4.80 kg bucket of water is accelerated upward by a cord of ...
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2answers
48 views

What happens to a radioactive element or isotope's electrons when it undergoes alpha decay? [duplicate]

It seems to make sense that when an atom loses two protons, it would lose two electrons as well, but I don't actually know what happens.
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2answers
745 views

Spring balance: what will be the reading? [duplicate]

There are two cases: When the two forces say L (for left) and R (for right) are equal. F=L=R What will be the reading? I know the reading would be F but why? When the two forces are unequal that is ...
22
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2answers
602 views

Hourglass on the Moon

Someone asked me this, and I was surprised to find I couldn't answer it: suppose I have an hourglass / egg timer that times two minutes in Earth's gravity. If I used it on the Moon, how long would it ...
74
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9answers
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Can we theoretically balance a perfectly symmetrical pencil on its one-atom tip?

I was asked by an undergrad student about this question. I think if we were to take away air molecules around the pencil and cool it to absolute zero, that pencil would theoretically balance. Am I ...
2
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2answers
214 views

Lagrange's equation implying Newton's 2nd law? [duplicate]

The typical first application of Lagrange's equation is showing that it implies Newton's law for a particle whose Lagrangian is $L=\frac{1}{2}mv^2-V(x)$. Plugging this Lagrangian into Lagrange's ...
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6answers
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Why is friction force negative in ice skater problem?

A 68.5 kg skater moving initially at 2.40m/s on rough horizontal ice comes to rest uniformly in 3.52s due to friction from the ice. What force does friction exert on the skater? I am not really ...
23
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5answers
7k views

Build a ring around Earth, then remove the supports

What would happen if we decided to build a giant ring that managed to wrap around the whole world, end to end that was supported with pillars all along the ring and then the supports all suddenly ...
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2answers
118 views

how is this kind of rolling motion possible?

I was solving this problem : Suppose you put a sphere in a rough ground with velocity of center of mass $v_{cm}= v_o$ in the positive $x$ axis and with anticlockwise angular momentum $\omega_o$ so ...
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1answer
211 views

Why frequency and tension doesn't change in the two medium?

I am reading a book about wave mechanics. There are two different cord (one light and one heavy) connected together, one person waving the lighter one, the wave transverse to the right from the ...
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3answers
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Is there a general rule for determining the direction of tension force?

Tension, for me, is a tricky thing. After finishing a related chapter of my book and watching a video, I still can't get a hang of it. Here is a situation: My knowledge is that tension, just like ...
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2answers
153 views

What is the work done?

A painter uses 1.93kJ of mechanical energy to pull on the rope and lift a 20kg paint barrel at constant speed to a height of 7.5m above the ground. How much work was done lifting the paint barrel? I ...
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2answers
738 views

Is Newton's third compatible with retarded Lorentz force?

In Griffiths Introduction to electrodynamics it is said that Newton's third law is not valid in electrodynamics, but, in the example given, the it does not consider the retarded values for the fields ...