Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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Trajectory of rolling billiard ball after collision with another billiard ball with same mass

So, according to this article http://www.real-world-physics-problems.com/physics-of-billiards.html , the trajectory of white (cue) ball is always perpendicular to the line connecting center of ball ...
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Force applied on object moving in circular direction [closed]

I should start by saying I am not a physics expert, but I need to know the below. I have tried searching the web for this information but I was not able to find anything more than angular velocity and ...
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2answers
454 views

Is Newton's third compatible with retarded Lorentz force?

In Griffiths Introduction to electrodynamics it is said that Newton's third law is not valid in electrodynamics, but, in the example given, the it does not consider the retarded values for the fields ...
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2answers
760 views

What will be the equation of motion of driven pendulum for amplitudes beyond the small angle approximation?

When finding the period of a pendulum beyond the small angle approximation, we have to use integration for small interval of $\theta$ and elliptical integration. I was trying to apply this situation ...
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36 views

Inclined plane problem - admission exam [closed]

This following problem was featured on my Physics admission exam and I didn't know how to approach it properly : Consider an inclined plane at an angle $\theta = 45 ° $ of mass $M = 9 kg$. On the ...
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2answers
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Can all the theorems of classical mechanics be deduced from Newton's laws?

As above, is the whole edifice of Newtonian mechanics built upon Newton's three laws of motion? Can I deduce all the theorems without referring to further assumptions?
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14answers
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Is it possible to walk in a friction-less world?

Is it possible to walk in a frictionless world. I think you won't be able to walk because walking depends on friction acting on your feet. I think about it like an ice rink because when you try to ...
2
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2answers
380 views

Does a pivot exert an additional force, normal to the centripetal force, on an object rotating about it?

A thin plank of mass $M$ and length $l$ is pivoted at one end. The plank is released at 60$^{\circ}$ from the vertical. What is the magnitude and direction of the force on the pivot when the plank ...
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0answers
25 views

Maximum acceleration to break a string [closed]

A block of mass m is attached to an inextensible string and is moving upwards. The breaking strength of the string is 4mg. What is the maximum positive and negative accelerations that the block can ...
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1answer
47 views

Work done by friction on a ball flying through air [closed]

A baseball of mass 145 g leaves a pitcher’s hand at 150km/hr, but due to constant air resistance, it arrives at home plate 20.0m away traveling at 145km/hr Assume that the magnitude of the ball’s ...
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0answers
36 views

Physics Question [closed]

A horizontal spring with spring constant 150 N/m is compressed 18cm and used to launch a 2.9kg box across a frictionless, horizontal surface. After the box travels some distance, the surface ...
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1answer
40 views

Why not include the energy exerted by the pitcher in a kinematics problem of a flying baseball?

I solved the question below using the principle of conservation of energy. Namely, i calculated that $$\text{KE}(i)+ (\text{Friction} \times \text{Displacment})(\cos 180) = \text{KE}(f) \, .$$ I found ...
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3answers
423 views

Why does the moment of force (aka. torque) depend on the perpendicular distance?

Couyld anyone explain how the lecturer concluded that $$(\underline{r_2} - \underline{r_1}) \times \underline{H} = \underline{p} \times \underline{H}$$
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5answers
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Can we escape Earth's gravity slowly?

I had a recent conversation with my girlfriend, who is a physics grad student. She was kind enough to listen to me rant about an idea concerning escape velocity. Unfortunately, I am still thinking ...
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6answers
1k views

Do centripetal and reactive centrifugal forces cancel each other out?

In order for a body to move with uniform velocity in a circular path, there must exist some force towards the centre of curvature of the circular path. This is centripetal force. By Newton's Third ...
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3answers
50 views

Force to deflect ball colliding with wall

Suppose I have a ball with a certain coefficient of restitution. The wall can be considered indeformable and with infinite mass. Everything's in 3 dimensions, and the ball can hit the wall at any ...
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0answers
11 views

Finding work required to increase the length [closed]

A wire has a length 1m and area $mm^2$. The work required to increase its length by 2mm is? Given: young's modulus of wire $2\times 10^{11} Nm^{-2}$ The answer is 0.4J. Could someone explain how?
3
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1answer
299 views

Rolling a ball into a cone; what should the forces overall be?

This is my solution to finding angular displacement/velocity/acceleration on cone so far. Consider a cone, with an apex of half-angle $\psi$ pointing down, and a height of $h$. If I roll a ball into ...
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2answers
140 views

How to find out how far a ball will travel after it's 3rd bounce? [closed]

Suppose I drop a ball from a height $H$ above a flat ground, how can I determine how far it will have traveled by the time the ball hits the ground for the 3rd time $L=x$?. I know how to calculate ...
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1answer
30 views

What velocity do I need to get the moons orbit perfectly aligned with the earths center [closed]

I have a simulation for universal gravity with two objects. How can I calculate the velocity or instantaneous force I would need to apply to object 2 (the moon) to get it to orbit so that the origin ...
1
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1answer
34 views

How does Foucault's pendulum work in a place other than the poles?

I find it easy to understand how Foucault's pendulum works at the poles, the pendulum oscillates in a fixed plane and we, along with the earth, rotate around it. So it appears that the pendulum's ...
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1answer
98 views

Figuring out the time period of an Atwood system

SO I was working on Atwoods, when I came up with the following problem, It is more complicated but i should understand this simpler scenario first. As shown in the diagram above, (Atwood machine), ...
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1answer
32 views

Force when a ring is sliding down

A setup comprises of a metal box with a metal pole at the centre. The mass of the metal box and pole is M. A ring of mass m slides down the pole with an acceleration a. The frictional force between ...
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1answer
18 views

Which to use? Radius of curvature? Or simple newtonian dynamics? [closed]

Here's a question: A piece of wire is bent in the shape of a parabola $y=5x^2$. A bead can slide through it when it is at rest. The wire is now accelerated uniformly along $x$ axis. What is the ...
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2answers
62 views

Pulley-rope tension question

I'm learning mechanics and I don't understand the following (simple, I guess) concept. Here's a pulley-rope system: The force of tension, as I understand it, is defined as the force exerted on an ...
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30 views

Finding the minimum Force [closed]

As shown in the picture.force(F) is acting on two masses. There is no friction between (M) and the surface.the friction between (m) and (M) is (mu).the system is moving because of the force and ...
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2answers
83 views

How this formula for work follows from the definition?

If a particle moves along a path $\gamma : I\subset \mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}^3$ then the work done by a force $\mathbf{F}$ is defined by $$W = \int_{\gamma} \mathbf{F} = ...
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1answer
39 views

Would I be able to see light coming towards me before it got to me

If I were in space looking at a star that just started producing light that was two light years away. Would I be able to see the light coming towards me?
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Variable Mass System of Greater-Than One Dimension

It seems I can only find information on variable mass systems in one dimension when approached with Newtonian mechanics. When dealing with a variable mass system of two dimensions (for example), you'd ...
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2answers
89 views

Damping Constant for a Ball Rolling in a Bowl

How would you find the damping constant of a ball rolling without slipping in half of a sphere? I know how to find the period of the oscillation, but how would I find the damping constant ...
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0answers
19 views

I need a good book for learning mechanics in non-inertial frames [duplicate]

I'm studying classical mechanics, but without those stuffs Lagrangians and Hamiltonian mechanics...just Newtonian..the problem is a find hard to learn this non-inertial frames system, like ...
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1answer
132 views

Derive Equation For a Cantilever in SHM

I am currently investigating how a hacksaw blade's time period of oscillation changes when I add mass to the end of it or when I change the length it is clamped at. I found the following equation ...
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2answers
49 views

Saturn V horizontally attached to Earth

If the Saturn V rocket were attached to the ground facing in the opposite direction of the Earth's spin, would it in anyway slow the Earth's spin on its axis? How significant of an impact would it ...
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3answers
66 views

Can the anti-torque of a motor be used to spin a space vehicle about it's axis?

Imagine an electric motor together with its power supply in space. What exactly will happen to it if it is suddenly powered? Will it spin about its axis, or it will experience no motion relative to an ...
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1answer
40 views

One person catch? [closed]

Starting from rest, a child throws a ball of mass m with an initial speed v , at an angle B with the horizontal direction. The child then chases after the ball, accelerating at a constant ...
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1answer
29 views

exercise involving conservation laws [closed]

Well the question says- There is a plank of mass $5kg$ and its placed on a friction-less horizontal plane and a block of mass $1kg$ is kept over it and a massless spring of natural length $2m$ is ...
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1answer
104 views

What determines the speed required to pull a table cloth?

I was watching this show "Street Genius" on National Geographic and the host Tim Shaw demonstrated an experiment about Inertia, What he did was, He tied one end of a table cloth to a car through a ...
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3answers
58 views

How to apply Newton's first law to moving object?

I'm new to many forces, such as gravity and friction, and I don't really know how they work. I'm trying to simulate a ball bouncing with a program, and it travels at a constant speed horizontally. I ...
5
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2answers
300 views

How does one write Newtons 2nd Law using the language of forms?

Newton's second law says that $F=ma$. Supposing that the force is conservative and can thus be expressed in terms of a potential $V$ we have that $F=-dV$. We have that $V$, being a function, can ...
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1answer
36 views

Net work done by projectiles?

When the projectile is in motion what is the net work done on projectiles? What i think? 0 first view: We know when we throw projectiles the initial KE and final KE is 0. So from work energy ...
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0answers
11 views

Averaging Multiple Load Graph Values

I'm aware this is a problem of statistical analysis, but given my background in physics and the physical nature of the problem I felt it was best to ask this question in this SE rather than ...
1
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1answer
31 views

Applying impulse to velocity

I'm writing physics engine and so far got some good results but stuck on 1 task i would like to ask. Got some mistake in my formula. Here is a question:Imagine 1 square colliding into another one. ...
4
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4answers
382 views

A confusion regarding an example in The Feynman Lectures

In The Feynman Lectures, In the chapter entitled Work and potential energy, Feynman states: The work done in going around any path in a gravitational field is zero. This is a very remarkable ...
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1answer
63 views

How do spacecraft gain kinetic energy by passing near planets? [duplicate]

When a a spacecraft like Voyager travels close to Jupiter, it somehow gains kinetic energy. I'm not sure how this energy isn't simply lost again as it moves away from Jupiter. I'm also hoping this ...
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0answers
37 views

Magnetic field on axis of solenoid

So first I'd like to say that I have asked similar questions to this one. However, all the answers involve a level of calculus that I do not yet know. (Still on limits, going to spend the rest of ...
0
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1answer
374 views

Walking and Friction

If walking is a result of the reaction to a kick backwards to the ground (reaction being friction), it appears that it should be true that the kick will have to be less than the kinetic friction ...
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2answers
74 views

A confusion regarding friction

Suppose there is a block which is being pulled by two forces A,B in opposite direction(as shown in figure). If we have no information regarding the forces $A$ and $B$, can we tell whether there is any ...
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3answers
65 views

How does The work done in going around any path in a gravitational field is zero implies conservation of energy?

In The Feynman Lectures, Feynman states: The work done in going around any path in a gravitational field is zero. This is a very remarkable result. It tells us something we did not previously ...
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3answers
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