0
votes
0answers
26 views

Does gravity weaken by the square of the distance because the energy is dispersed over the square of the distance [duplicate]

The area of a circle is $\pi r^2$ if you increase $r$ the area will increase by the square so if this area was of energy and you increase the area it is dispersed you would expect its energy to weaken ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Is there an analogous Gauss' law which is applicable for a gravitational field?

Consider the Earth to be a flat infinite plane having linear mass density equal to the mass density of the actual earth. Can there be an analogous Gauss' law that can give the gravitational field ...
8
votes
1answer
143 views

Why does acceleration seem not to be the gradient of gravitational potential?

Consider a spherically symmetric distribution of density $\rho(r)$. We can define the mass enclosed within each radius $r$ using $\frac{dM(r)}{dr} = 4\pi r^2 \rho(r)$, with the condition that $M(r=0) ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Gauss law from Gauss divergence theorem [duplicate]

Apply Gauss divergence theorem to the gravitational field due to a spherical object of mass M and uniform density located at origin. Obtain Gauss law for gravitation in integral and differential ...
2
votes
2answers
213 views

Newtonian gravity equation in a 2 dimensional world [duplicate]

I am wondering if my line of thought is correct - and thus the resulting answer to the problem above would be correct. As we know the gravitational force (of two point masses) is given by $$F = ...
1
vote
3answers
373 views

Is Newtonian gravity consistent with an infinite universe? [duplicate]

Let us assume that we have have an infinite Newtonian space-time and the universe is uniformly filled with matter of constant density (no fluctuations whatsoever), all of it at rest. By symmetry, the ...
2
votes
1answer
147 views

Newtonian Gravity on a Riemannian $3$-Manifold

To solve the Poisson equation for the Newton Potential, say $\phi$, one can use the divergence theorem, such that $$\int_U \nabla^2 \phi \sqrt{g}~ dV= \int_{\partial U} <\nabla \phi,n> ...
1
vote
1answer
505 views

Gravity force strength in 1D, 2D, 3D and higher spatial dimensions

Let's say that we want to measure the gravity force in 1D, 2D, 3D and higher spatial dimensions. Will we get the same force strength in the first 3 dimensions and then it will go up? How about if ...
9
votes
5answers
617 views

Intuitive explanation of the inverse square power $\frac{1}{r^2}$ in Newton's law of gravity

Is there an intuitive explanation why it is plausible that the gravitational force which acts between two point masses is proportional to the inverse square of the distance $r$ between the masses (and ...
15
votes
4answers
1k views

Why are so many forces explainable using inverse squares when space is three dimensional?

It seems paradoxical that the strength of so many phenomena (Newtonian gravity, Coulomb force) are calculable by the inverse square of distance. However, since volume is determined by three ...
2
votes
1answer
499 views

Formula of Gauss' Law of Gravitation

Gauss's law for Gravitation: $$\int g\cdot \mathrm{d}S=4\pi GM$$ where $g$ is the gravitational field and $S$ is the surface area. Am I correct?
0
votes
1answer
346 views

Gauss's Law vs Newton's Law

This is thought experiment. I couldn't get a good answer because I keep getting negative mass. Gauss's Law say that eletric field is proportional to charge, how much charged is enclosed. Newton's ...