The Newtonian model of gravity in which the force between two objects is given by GMm/r^2.

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Question on motion of vehicles

What slows us down while we are climbing in a sloped road, and what makes us faster while sliding down? Friction and what else?
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1answer
33 views

How would you go about solving this graphical mass problem? [on hold]

I've tried finding the x and y components of the vectors created by each mass to find the resulting vector's magnitude. However, my answer of 0.354 N keeps getting marked wrong. Any ideas on how to ...
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0answers
45 views

Potential Energy = mgh. What is the name of this principle and did Newton discover it?

Somebody I know keeps trying to convince me that Potential Energy $PE=mgh$ is one of Newton's Laws (as well as the closely related idea, Work Done = force x distance moved). I am fairly certain that ...
2
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1answer
103 views

What is the significance of the Inverse-square law? [duplicate]

Considering its occurrences in various fields like Electrostatics, Gravitation, Acoustics etc. how does the law bind these topics together?
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0answers
5 views

Acceleration as a function of time in Newtonian gravity [duplicate]

In Newtonian gravity, you have acceleration as a function of separation distance $r$ as $a(r) = GM/r^2$. I need to derive acceleration as function of time, i.e. $a(t)$. PS I got into this when I ...
3
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1answer
68 views

Gravitational force between Earth and Sun is decreasing

According to one of the most famous equations in physics, i.e. $E=mc^2$, the mass of the Sun is decreasing as it emits energy. So there must be some kind of disturbance in planetary orbits, and if ...
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2answers
42 views

How well-defined is the infinite-sheet-of-mass computation?

When computing the gravitational force from an infinite plane (or the electrical field from an infinite sheet of charge), it is standard to begin by making a symmetry argument to say that the ...
3
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1answer
43 views

Maximum range in projectile motion (elliptical path)

Elementary Newtonian mechanics tells us that if a projectile is shot at 45 degrees from the ground, and a downward gravitational field is acting on it, it will follow a parabolic path and achieve ...
5
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2answers
58 views

How much mass must Earth lose to lose its Moon?

Maybe I am wrong about the basic concept here, but for my curiosity: how much mass would need to leave the Earth (like satellites and rockets) to create an imbalance between the Earth and Moon so that ...
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1answer
43 views

Who will feel more pain when jumping from a height, a tall man or a short man? [on hold]

Whether the impact on a tall man is greater than a short man when he jumps from a height?
18
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3answers
2k views

Gravitational force when standing on an infinite disc

If a person were to stand on a flat disc of thickness 1 meter but infinite diameter, would they experience finite or infinite downward force? There is an infinite amount of mass, all of which ...
56
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5answers
8k views

Why do archery arrows tilt downwards in their descent?

In the movies, arrows shot into the air rotate so that during the descent, the arrow head hits ground first. What is the source of this angular momentum? It would seem that the bow string exerts a ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Are lighter molecules in the air more affected by earth gravity?

Or: Why are raindrops falling? In vacuum a heavy (big mass) object is attracted by gravity with the same speed as a light object as shown on the moon with the hamer and the feather. But on earth ...
2
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2answers
499 views

Escape velocity at an angle

Comparing the work required for a mass to escape the Earth's gravity to the necessary initial kinetic energy gives us the escape velocity from the surface of the Earth of around $11\;\mathrm{km\cdot s^...
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0answers
30 views

Predict position of a body in an elliptical orbit in Cartesian coordinates [closed]

A spaceship is orbiting a star on a 2-dimensional plane. I know: The orbit is elliptical The mass of the star Where the star is in x,y coordinates Where the spaceship is in x,y coordinates. The semi-...
4
votes
2answers
142 views

Weight Distribution of granular piles

I was recently at a farm watching piles of grain being formed in the shape of enormous cones. Each of these grain stacks weighs in excess of 50 tonnes. I am not a physicist but I am very curious as to ...
0
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0answers
17 views

How can I measure the stability of a many body gravitational system?

Suppose I have an N body planetary system interacting via gravity. Suppose I know the positions and momenta at t=0. How do I know if this system is stable (indefinitely)? By stable I mean the ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Tidal effect on planet with two moons

If an Earthlike planet had two moons, one relatively smaller and closer while the other was bigger and farther away, and one had a prograde orbit while the other had a retrograde orbit, in what ways ...
76
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8answers
9k views

Could a “living planet” alter its own trajectory only by changing its shape?

In Stanislaw Lem's novel Solaris the planet is able to correct its own trajectory by some unspecified means. Assuming its momentum and angular momentum is conserved (it doesn't eject or absorb any ...
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1answer
27 views

Solar balloon vs hydrogen or helium filled balloon

This is my very first post here and I used the search engine to make sure this set of questions was not asked before. Sorry if it is the case for some reason. Feel free to delete my post. Here are my ...
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0answers
29 views

Why does the inverse square law cause elliptical orbits? [duplicate]

I've seen it printed multiple places, here for example, that the reason orbits are elliptical is because the gravitational law has an inverse square of the radius. Why does this make the orbits ...
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0answers
34 views

Mathematical proof for elliptical orbit of planets [duplicate]

Elliptical orbits are stable for planets. But how to mathematically derive this result that a planet travels in an elliptical path? How are circular orbits less stable than elliptical orbits for ...
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2answers
82 views

Negative Gravity Fields and Time Dilation [duplicate]

Question: Some physicists believe that it is possible to have negative mass. My questions is would this negative mass create a negative gravity field, exerting a negative force on positive masses? And ...
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1answer
30 views

Where does gravity get it's energy to cause tides? [duplicate]

The moon's orbital radius is fixed as a function of its velocity (I know it is actually drifting..). Since there is nothing in space to resist this velocity, it will continue orbiting "forever". Now ...
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2answers
111 views

Equation for a falling body including terminal velocity

I'm making an app that times how long it takes a pebble to fall, then calculates the distance it fell. I noticed that the simple $f(t) = \frac{1}{2}gt^2$ was becoming increasingly inaccurate as the ...
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0answers
28 views

Average of the velocity vector along a Keplerian orbit

I would like to show that the average of the velocity vector $\mathbf{v}$ along one Keplerian orbit vanishes, i.e. $$ \frac{1}{2 \pi}\int_{0}^{2 \pi} \!\!\!\! \mathrm{d} M \, \mathbf{v} = \frac{1}{T}\...
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1answer
29 views

Rolling motion of a rigid object

I have the situation described in this picture I know the speed of the ball at the top of the loop ($v_{top} = 2.38 m/s$), and I have to demonstrate that the ball does not fall from the track at ...
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1answer
52 views

Gravity and angular momentum

When a mass moves towards a bigger mass at a constant velocity, they will be attracted to each other such that the smaller mass will revolve around the bigger mass with the same speed as before. ...
4
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1answer
58 views

Details of Newtonian Prediction for Mercury's Precession

Could anyone point me to a book or outline the methods used to actually calculate the 532 arcseconds per century that Newtonian theory apparently predicts for Mercury's precession. I am completely ...
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0answers
59 views

Why does a velocity that gives gravity's centripetal acceleration make you stay in orbit?

Explanations of basic orbital mechanics that I can find all go, $$\frac{v_{satellite}^2}{r} = a_c = \frac{F_{gravity}}{M_{planet}} = \frac{(\frac{G M_a M_s}{r^2})}{M_{planet}}$$ , and so you get a ...
4
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2answers
97 views

If maximum speed limit $c$ is made infinite, will general theory of relativity become equivalent to Newton's gravitational theory?

We know that special relativity tends to become equivalent to classical theory of relativity as the speed limit of nature becomes infinite. If this happens, clock will tick at the same rate ...
-3
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4answers
105 views

Orbits for dummies [duplicate]

In a certain universe a perfectly spherical, uniformly dense planet is found to be in a stable orbit around a stable star. The rest of the universe is empty space with no silly stuff like dark matter. ...
3
votes
3answers
368 views

Why the $r$ is cubed in the vector notation for of Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation? [duplicate]

I'm learning about astrodynamics on my own and I was wondering why the $r$ is cubed in the vector notation for of Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation: $$\vec{F}_g=\frac{Gm_1m_2}{|\vec{r}|^3}\vec{r}$...
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2answers
49 views

Why doesn't the gravitational force have a permittivity in its formula? [duplicate]

We know that the electrostatic force between two charges depends on the medium between the charges and its permittivity. Why, then, doesn't the gravitational force depend on the medium?
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0answers
61 views

Are tides just very very very weak spaghettification?

I was wondering as to why there are two tidal bulges instead of just one on Earth, and then I saw this diagram: The oval shape that the Earth's water is transformed into in this image reminded me of ...
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1answer
35 views

What is the gravitational/electric/inverse-square field inside a cylinder?

I've read from the shell theorem that an inverse-square potential has zero field inside a spherical shell. What about the field inside a cylinder? Are objects inside a long cylinder attracted to the ...
15
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4answers
4k views

If water is essentially incompressible, why are there tides?

So recently we were taught in school that tides are formed because the moon 'cancels out' some of the earth's gravity, and so the water rises because of the weaker force. But if water is not ...
5
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3answers
405 views

Terminal velocity after vertical launch

If an object is launched directly up at its terminal velocity, will it have enough time/energy to reach its terminal velocity again before it hits the ground, or will drag prevent this? In this case, ...
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2answers
67 views

Which timestep should I use for a $N$-body simulation of the Solar system?

I am trying to implement a $N$-body simulation of the Solar system and I am stuck on the issue of the simulation timestep size. At first I would like to use a simple Euler stepping scheme. Knowing ...
2
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2answers
86 views

Question about inertial mass and gravitational mass

I know that inertial mass $m_i$ is the quantity that appears in Newton's second law: $F=m_ia$ and that gravitational mass $m_{g_1}$ is the quantity that appears in Newton's gravitational law: $F_g=Gm_{...
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1answer
40 views

Unification of Newtonian gravity and electrostatic force [closed]

Can we not unify Newtonian gravity & electrostatic force? All properties are almost same. We can imagine the atoms of the Earth's core to become dipoles when a body is freely-falling. Thus, due to ...
-1
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2answers
49 views

Problem with derivation of potential enery of two body in Gravitational energy

Maybe what I'm going to ask sounds stupid but it means a lot to me that's why I'm asking. I've problem with just a single step in derivation. Let's start. I'm keeping in mind the direction of each ...
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2answers
43 views

Reference frame, gravitation and kinetic energy

English is not my primary language. I apologize (and would like corrections) if the terms I use are not the right ones. In a geocentric reference frame, the moon rotates around the Earth. So its ...
46
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4answers
3k views

Why do some location on Earth have only one tidal maximum per day instead of two?

Most places in the ocean have two high tides and two low tides per "day" (~25 hours). But I remember reading that some locations only have one of each per day. This answer has some great explanations ...
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2answers
71 views

Proportional acceleration due to changing density of the Earth

My question has to to do with a recent video Minutephysics posted about the time it takes for a person to fall through the earth, found here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urQCmMiHKQk At around 4:05,...
1
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1answer
90 views

Period of a pendulum [closed]

In the book 'Calculus the Early Transcendetals' at page 776 (7th edition) they give that the period of a pendulum with length $\text{L}$ that makes a maximum angle $\theta_0$ with the vertical is: $$\...
0
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1answer
73 views

As planets orbit around the Sun, does the force of gravity due to the Sun remain constant?

I know that the force of gravity is: $$F = GMm/R^2$$ Where $G$ is gravitational constant, $M$ is mass of sun, $m$ is mass of the orbiting planet and $R$ is the distance between the center of their ...
1
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0answers
60 views

Does a ball bearing cause bigger tides than the moon?

As per the answer to this question it is suggested the relative tidal pull of objects of equal angular area is equal to their relative density. Which lead me to the click-baity question: Does a ball ...
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2answers
50 views

Would an astronaut floating in space at zero speed get drawn to the Earth?

The question came to mind after watching this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTY1Kje0yLg If the Earth and Moon can bend space-time, and if the Earth's gravity is strong enough to reach the ...
3
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1answer
76 views

Why didn't I beat the avalanche?

Yesterday, while skiing out of bounds on the south west canyons of Mt. Hood, I experienced a small and extremely mild quake. This, combined with the melting conditions caused an extremely small ...