The Navier-Stokes equations describe fluid flows in continuum mechanics.

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Why can't the Navier Stokes equations be derived from first principle physics?

At the 109th UCLA Faculty Research lecture, Seth Putterman gave a talk on Sonoluminescence. During the lecture he emphasized that "The Navier Stokes equations cannot be derived from first principles [...
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What is the mystery of turbulence?

One of the great unsolved problems in physics is turbulence but I'm not too clear what the mystery is. Does it mean that the Navier-Stokes equations don't have any turbulent phenomena even if we solve ...
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About turbulence modeling

I have some questions about this paper: Lagrangian/Hamiltonian formalism for description of Navier-Stokes fluids. R. J. Becker. Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 no. 14 (1987), pp. 1419-1422. After reading ...
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How to calculate the upper limit on the number of days weather can be forecast reliably?

To put it bluntly, weather is described by the Navier-Stokes equation, which in turn exhibits turbulence, so eventually predictions will become unreliable. I am interested in a derivation of the time-...
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Lagrangian for Euler Equations in general relativity

The stress energy tensor for relativistic dust $$ T_{\mu\nu} = \rho v_\mu v_\nu $$ follows from the action $$ S_M = -\int \rho c \sqrt{v_\mu v^\mu} \sqrt{ -g } d^4 x = -\int c \sqrt{p_\mu ...
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Could Navier-Stokes equation be derived directly from Boltzmann equation?

I know how to derive Navier-Stokes equations from Boltzmann equation in case where bulk and viscosity coefficients are set to zero. I need only multiply it on momentum and to integrate it over ...
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Occurrence of turbulence in fluid dynamics from the equations of motion?

How can it be shown that turbulence occurs in fluid dynamics? I think people imply that it develops because of the $\text{rot}$ terms in the equations of motion, i.e. the Navier-Stokes equations, ...
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Exact Solutions to the Navier-Stokes Equations [closed]

There are a number of exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. How many exact solutions are currently known? Is it possible to enumerate all of the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations?
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Would a solution to the Navier-Stokes Millennium Problem have any practical consequences?

I know the problem is especially of interest to mathematicians, but I was wondering if a solution to the problem would have any practical consequences. Upon request: this is the official problem ...
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Why does a transformation to a rotating reference frame NOT break temporal scale invariance?

Naively, I thought that transforming a scale invariant equation (such as the Navier-Stokes equations for example) to a rotating reference frame (for example the rotating earth) would break the ...
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Friction term in Navier-Stokes equation

The friction term in Navier-Stokes equation assumes that the viscosity coefficients are the same for the longitudinal and transverse directions. This doesn't seem intuitive, because the former is ...
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Is there an analytical solution for fluid flow in a square duct?

I couldn't find one but assumed it must exist. Tried to find it on the back of an envelope, but got to an ugly differential equation I can't solve. I'm assuming a square duct of infinite length, ...
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General procedure for solving fluid flow problems

Could someone help me devise a short series of steps for solving an arbitrary fluid flow problem? Often the most difficult part of these problems is just figuring out what path to take in solving ...
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Where can I check a solution to 3D Navier Stokes?

A few years ago I developed a solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and as of yet have not been able to locate a similar version of the solution. I would like to know if anyone has seen a solution ...
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Convective and Diffusive terms in Navier Stokes Equations

My question has 2 parts: I just followed the derivation of Navier Stokes (for Control Volume CFD analysis) and was able to understand most parts. However, the book I use (by Versteeg) does not ...
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Navier-Stokes Energy Equation

I've been assigned (for homework in a mathematical modelling course) the task of deriving the Navier-Stokes energy equation in one space dimension: Consider a fluid flowing through a cylindrical ...
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Why are Navier-Stokes equations needed?

Can't we picture air or water molecules individually? Then, why are Navier-Stokes equations needed, after all? Can't we just aggregate individual ones? Or is it computationally difficult, or ...
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Gravity duals to Navier Stokes and interpretation of non linear contributions

I have been reading the paper The Incompressible Non-Relativistic Navier-Stokes Equation from Gravity. In it they state, "An instability, if it occurs, must necessarily break a symmetry ... ...
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The Euler equations as a RNG fixed point

In this paper at the at the beginning of the last paragraph on p.2 it is said, that the Euler equations, which are an infinite Reynolds number limit of the Navier-Stokes equations, arise as an RNG ...
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What type of PDE are Navier-Stokes equations, and Schrödinger equation?

What type of PDE are Navier-Stokes equations, and Schrödinger equation? I mean, are they parabolic, hyperbolic, elliptic PDEs?
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No diffusion term in conservation of mass in Navier-Stokes equations?

I have followed derivations of the Navier-Stokes equations and I can see how the various terms arise in the "main equation", the momentum conservation equation. However I don't understand why the ...
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Physical interpretation of the change of diffusion term in navier stokes equations

In the Navier-Stokes Equations, there is one term accounting for convective flow and one term for diffusive flow. At high flow rates, the diffusive term becomes much smaller compared to convective ...
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Fluid flow: Force acting on the fluid and the Navier-Stokes equation

Consider a one dimensional fluid flow in a rectangular tube. Typical streams are the poiseuille streams. Consider the case in wich we apply a force on the fluid. The Navier-Stokes equation (for ...
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What's the shear rate in a turbulent flow?

The explanation of shear rate in laminar flow is straightforward: We imagine small layers of fluid that glide on each other. Now, in turbulent flow, this does not work as there are no layers. I'm not ...
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Why is turbulence caused?

In high Reynolds numbers we have turbulent flow. This is because the inertial forces are much greater than the viscous forces. I understand inertial forces to be actually the fictional forces due to ...
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How to derive the Karman-Howarth-Monin relation for anisotropic turbulence?

I find the derivation of the Karman-Howarth-Monin relation in the book Turbulence from Frisch (1995) a bit to short. Can someone point me to a more detailed derivation of that relation, if possible in ...
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Is the flow of a viscous fluid in free space under no pressure gradient always laminar?

Consider a (Newtonian) incompressible viscous fluid in three spatial dimensions, whose velocity field $\mathbb{v}=\mathbb{v}(x,y,z,t)$ moves according to the Navier-Stokes equations $$\tag{1}\label{...
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What do mathematicians mean by Navier Stokes existence and smoothness problem?

I still don't know what mathematicians mean by Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness. Since there is a reward for proving it, it seems important to them. (in past several months I've read online ...
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Is there a nice way to write Navier-Stokes equations in exterior calculus

I'm considering to study some high-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. One problem is to do write the viscous equation for vorticity, helicity and other conserved quantities. I think it might be ...
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Stokes law in 2-dimensions

Stokes' law states that force on slow moving sphere (i.e. $Re\ll1$) in liquid is $$ F_d = 6 \pi \mu R V $$ In two dimensions we are in trouble (flow around disk in 2d or around cylinder in 3d), ...
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Velocity profile of a viscously damped wave

For a test case, I want to determine the velocity profile of a viscously damped standing wave. By linearizing the density ($\rho=\rho_0+\rho'$) and velocity ($ux=ux'$), the continuity and Navier-...
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Explicit form of the entropy production in hydrodynamics

I'm trying to understand how hydrodynamics arise from a precise, mathematical formulation of thermodynamics, learning mostly from Landau's "Hydrodynamics". So Landau starts from formulating the ...
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Difference between Eulerian and Lagrangian formulation of Fluid Dynamics

Difference between Eulerian and Lagrangian formulation of Fluid Dynamics. I am completely new to fluid mechanics. Until now definition $F = ma$ was sufficient for me to solve any rigid body problems ...
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Non-dimensionalizing incompressible Navier-Stokes

I have a question about non-dimensionalization of the incompressible Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. My understanding is that the purpose of non-dimensionalization is to "collapse" solutions onto one ...
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Why is the Reynolds number “the way it is?” Why is its order the way it is?

Why is the Reynolds number “the way it is?” Why is its order the way it is? I'm not sure if this is an appropriate question for this context, but I would like more intuition on this matter and so I'...
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assumptions about sound waves

When deriving the sound wave equation: $${1 \over c^2} {\partial^2 p' \over \partial t^2 }= \Delta^2 p' $$ by linearizing the Euler equation: $$\rho {d v \over dt }= - \nabla p $$ and the continuity ...
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What is the velocity in the Navier-Stokes equation?

I have been looking at the Navier-Stokes equation, and can't seem to find anywhere a clear description of what velocity it represents. From what I have read it could be any of the following: The '...
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Stress Force - Understanding Cauchy Stress Tensor

I've been trying to understand the derivation for the Cauchy Momentum Equation for so long now, and there is one part that every derivation glides over very quickly with practically no explanation (I'...
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Difference between a “source dipole” and a “force dipole”

I know quite well what a dipole is and in general what multipole moments are (in the context of, for instance, electrodynamics). What I find myself confused by is something called a "force dipole" in ...
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What is the physical application of Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness?

Recently, mathematician Mukhtarbay Otelbaev published a paper Existence of a strong solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, in which he claim that he solved one of the Millennium Problems: Existence ...
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Boussinesq approximation for the Navier Stokes' equation - discrepancy

In the Navier Stokes' equation: $\rho_0 \left( \frac{\partial v}{\partial t} + v \cdot \nabla v\right) = -\nabla p + \mu \nabla^2 v + \hat{f}$ I included the temperature variation of density as ...
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Inertial Waves - Why neglecting the advecting term?

I'm trying to derive the dispersion relation for Inertial waves. In Cartesian coordinates: Inviscid and incompressible fluid is rotating uniformly with Angular Velocity: $\Omega = (0, 0, \Omega)$ ...
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Analytical solution of transient barometric formula for fluid in one dimension

Consider a column of fluid of length $L$, with initial density $\rho_0$ and initial velocity ($u_0 =0$) everywhere. Now at time $t=0$ gravity is switched on. No-slip boundary conditions are assumed at ...
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Fluid dynamics equations, number of variables and number of equations

Continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for fluid are, \begin{eqnarray} \frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t} + \nabla\cdot (\rho \mathbf{u}) &=& 0 \\ \rho\left(\frac{\partial \mathbf{u}}{\partial t} ...
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boundary conditions for liquid with surface tension

so one uses equations of motion to describe liquids (e.g. Navier–Stokes equations). These are equations for $\vec{v}(\vec{r},t)$ with boundary conditions on the surface $S$ of the liquid (e.g. $\vec{v}...
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Solve unsteady state Bernoulli equation for flow in a pipe

I am an engineer studying an unsteady-state flow through a pipe. The Pipeline has been cleanly cut into two halves, without deforming the cylindrical form of the pipe, exposing the contents to ...
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Bulk and dynamic viscosity in the atmosphere

I'm studying the physics of the atmosphere but I'm struggling with the matter of viscosity (Navier-Stokes equation) for gravito-acoustic waves. From Landau-Lifschitz : $$ (T)_{ij} = -p\delta_{ij} + \...
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Existence and uniqueness of solutions to $\nabla^a T_{ab}$ in general (or special) relativity

The equation in the title of this question can be a relativistic analogue of the Navier-Stokes equation (in the sense that, in the low-velocity limit, it reduces to Euler's equation when $T_{ab}$ is ...
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Torque on a rotational cylinder in viscous fluid [closed]

I've been stuck on what I'm pretty sure is a simple part of a larger question. It's a cylinder (radius a) spinning in a viscous fluid. It's rotating at rate $\Omega$ .During this question we get that ...
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Does this dimensioneless quantity have a name?

When studying creeping flows, a common choice for a characteristic pressure scale is $$p_0 = \frac{\mu_0 U_0}{L_0},$$ where $\mu_0$ is a reference dynamic viscosity, $U_0$ is a reference velocity and $...