In introductory mechanics, the momentum of a particle is its mass times its velocity. In electrodynamics, the momentum of a field is proportional to the cross-product of the electric field with the magnetic field. In special relativity, momentum is generalized to four-momentum.

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Difference in “momentum” names in Lagrangian mechanics

In the context of Lagrangian formulation of classical mechanics, the following names keep occurring in most textbooks, which confuse me a lot, are they different in any way? Momentum Generalized ...
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47 views

A question regarding 3 bodies connected as a system

Let us consider three bodies of equal mass connected to each other with 2 ideal strings of length l. The three bodies are placed in a straight line In this arrangement there is 1 body connected to 2 ...
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204 views

Is any energy required to deflect an asteroid, with force always perpendicular to its trajectory?

Let's assume there is an asteroid traveling on a straight line (far from any gravitational source), and we need to deflect it from its actual trajectory, so we build a rocket motor on the surface and ...
2
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1answer
69 views

A question regarding collisions

Let us consider a system of 2 identical spherical bodies connected by a massless string that is taut. If one body is placed at the origin then the other is placed at some coordinate $(x,y)$. The ...
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2answers
133 views

Interpreting some domain issues of (potential) momentum operators

In the context of mathematical quantum mechanics, a well known no-go theorem known as Hellinger-Töplitz tells us that an unbounded, symmetric operator cannot be defined everywhere on the Hilbert space ...
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903 views

Center-of-mass frame for massless particles

Given a scattering event where a photon and electron go in and a photon and electron come out, what is the center of mass frame? I'd say, since the photon has no mass, it's the rest frame of the ...
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518 views

Does a force act on the body during collision

Consider two bodies A(black) and B(red) having equal mass. A is moving at a constant speed towards B, which is stationary. At certain point of time, they collide elastically, $\therefore u_{A}=v_{B}$ ...
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6answers
115 views

What is the relationship between force and momentum in collisions?

I know that $ \Sigma F = \Delta mv/\Delta t$. But if we had a marble that moves in a straight line at a constant velocity and colloids with another marble. Because of the law of conservation of ...
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2answers
111 views

Add weight in front or behind the moving wheel?

Consider a wheel with bearing and axle bar rolling on level ground. If I want to help the wheel continue moving longer(or faster speed), should I add weight by moving the rider body in front or ...
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1answer
145 views

In QED, why is the $e^- + e^+\leftrightarrow\gamma$ process forbidden on-shell?

QED has a vertex that couples a single photon to two fermions. This vertex describes the annihilation of an electron-positron pair into a photon. Why is this process forbidden for all three particles ...
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5answers
106 views

Relation between the conservation of Energy and the conservation of Momentum?

I just learn about the momentum and it conservative attribute in a closed and isolate system and there is something I don't understand when I relate it to the conservation of the energy Considering ...
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5answers
776 views

Conservation of Mathematical Constraints when deriving Energy and Momentum from $F=ma$

Background: Starting from $F = ma$, integrating with respect to time, and using basic calc, one can derive $\int Fdt = m (v_f - v_i)$ Starting from $F = ma$, integrating with respect to distance, ...
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0answers
98 views

Momentum operator in Dirac formalism

Could you derive the momentum operator as follows: Since $\mathcal{T}(\Delta x)=\exp(-ip_{x} \Delta x/ \hslash)$, if we set $\Delta x=x-0$ then it follows that $\left \langle x\right | ...
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2answers
44 views

Effect of movements of astronauts on International Space Station

I know that astronauts move in and around in ISS. When they move they also touch the modules of ISS and sometimes they apply force on the module to move. When this happens, as far as I know it affects ...
3
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1answer
83 views

Where does the partial derivative come from in Sakurai's derivation of the momentum operator?

How is the momentum operator derived in Dirac formalism? I am reading Quantum Mechanics by Sakurai and he gives the following derivation. But I don't understand how he goes from the third equation to ...
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1answer
734 views

How do I show the fractional change in Kinetic Energy in a completely inelastic collision?

Given the formula $$\frac{{\Delta}(KE)}{KE_i}=\frac{(KE_f-KE_i)}{KE_i}=\frac{-M}{(m+M)}$$ Now I know these that the conservation of momentum is always applicable. Also I understand that ...
3
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2answers
57 views

Elastic collisions and conservation of momentum

If you have an elastic collision between objects 1 and 2 and where 'kinetic energy is conserved', does this mean object 1 will always have the same velocity it had before the collision? Or will ...
2
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1answer
128 views

Confused about elasticity and collisions

I was solving the following problem and the explanation to it confused me. There are two objects with mass $m$ and $M$, respectively. The object with mass $m$ has a velocity of $\sqrt{2gl}$ and ...
3
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1answer
88 views

Special Relativity: Finding the Euler Lagrange of a massive particle

Knowing that $$\tag{1} L= -mc\sqrt{-\eta_{ab}\frac{d\xi^a}{d\lambda}\frac{d\xi^b}{d\lambda}}$$ we get $$\tag{2} p_a=\frac{\partial L}{\partial(d\xi^a/d\lambda)} = m\eta_{ab}u^b.$$ How come? If I ...
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2answers
53 views

In a CMCS 2-body system, why does the speed of the particles after collision stay the same?

A particle $m_1$ is traveling with velocity $v$ toward a stationary particle $m_2$. The velocity of the center of mass is given as $v_c=\frac{m_1}{m_1+m_2}v$. Changing to a moving coordinate system, ...
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3answers
93 views

Where does the energy required to stop a moving body come from and go?

For a long time, I have been thinking about this: In order to stop a moving body, I have to apply impulse to change the existing momentum to $0$. For the impulse I have to impart force on the moving ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Atmospheric pressure's effect on sound

An argument has been travelling in amongst my friends around this matter and after listening about it for 3 whole days I decided to ask it here. The Question is: Would a high atmospheric pressure ...
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2answers
73 views

Question relating to energy transfer in between two particles

How would I go about calculating the maximum kinetic energy transferred from one particle when it forms an elastic collision with another particle. For example, if I had two billiards one with mass m ...
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3answers
1k views

Conservation of momentum but not kinetic energy in inelastic collisions

In inelastic collisions, the kinetic energy of the system is not conserved but the momentum is. Kinetic energy is: $0.5 \times \text{mass} \times \text{velocity}^2$. Momentum is: ...
6
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1answer
416 views

Impact force in a fall

I'm a climber and I constructed myself an anchor that I fixed to a rock wall. To test it, I hooked to it a 12mm in section steel cable with a length of 2,8m and a concrete block of 30kg to the other ...
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84 views

“Rocket in a box” thought experiment

Here's a thought experiment that I came up with a while ago. It might be hard to visualize, so I'll describe it as best I can. Take a rocket in a vacuum, in outer space. Attach a large "box" to the ...
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Conservation of momentum and energy in an explosion

One simple problem is physics is to determine the mechanical energy difference after an explosion. To do this, you must assume that momentum is conserved because in a explosion you have internal ...
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180 views

Why is momentum conserved in an inelastic collision and kinetic energy is not conserved?

We know that in an inelastic collision that total momentum of the system before collision equals the total momentum after collision. But total kinetic energy before collision is not equal to total ...
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1answer
63 views

Is momentum of a moving body a vector or a scalar quantity?

Is momentum of a moving body a vector or a scalar?
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47 views

Four-momentum, four-velocity, energy

If given the four-momentum of any particle monitored by an observer as: p = $p^\hat{α}e_\hat{α}$ using unit vectors in observer’s reference frame and u = $e_\hat{0}$ then I get I'm just ...
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3answers
295 views

The elusive difference between impulse and momentum

1) In classical mechanics, impulse is the product of a force, F, and the time, t, for which it acts. The impulse of a force acting for a given time interval is equal to the change in linear ...
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1answer
46 views

Question on the negativity of the coefficient of restitution

I was trying to solve a Mechanics question on Momentum. Here is the question : Two small smooth spheres A and B have equal radii and have masses m and km respectively. They are moving in a ...
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1answer
247 views

What are the general solutions to a hard sphere collision?

Surely someone has found the solutions to the hard sphere collisions (in $n$ dimensions) of two bodies of mass $m_1$ and $m_2$, respectively--that is the resultant velocities (or momenta) of the two ...
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Momentum of capacitor in a uniform magnetic field

We are observing ideal, charged, parallel plate capacitor placed in uniform magnetic field parallel to plates. Whole system is at rest and isolated (we have forces that hold plates separated, but net ...
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9answers
724 views

Why does Energy-Momentum have a special case?

I was reading Energy-momentum, and I came across this simplified equation: $$E^2 = (mc^2)^2 + (pc)^2$$ where $m$ is the mass and $p$ is momentum of the object. That said, the equation is pretty ...
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3answers
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Does conservation of momentum really imply Newton's third law?

I often heard that conservation of momentum is nothing else than Newton's third law. Ok, If you have only two interacting particles in the universe, this seems to be quite obvious. However if you ...
2
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3answers
301 views

When is momentum not conserved?

What are some common examples where momentum is not conserved? This question arose in my mind when I read that a ball dropped from a height penetrates into a bed of sand and that momentum is ...
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654 views

Punching - Force or Momentum?

If I want to punch a person inflicting maximum damage, what do I need to care about? My force of punching, i.e, do I need more acceleration? Or do I need momentum, i.e my velocity for punching?
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Can conservation of momentum and conservation of energy explain every possible event in the Universe?

I heard my friend, a researcher, say that we can, in theory, explain every event happening in the universe using the Conservation of momentum and energy. He added that we may not be able to do that ...
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Momentum of electron problem [duplicate]

Recently, my friend bemused me with a question related to the momentum of an electron. The confusing logic is stated below: Since an electron is a particle and according to classical physics, we know ...
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2answers
48 views

Recommendation on ADM mass and Bondi mass

I want to learn some advanced topics in GR, such as ADM 4-momentum and Bondi 4-momentum. However nearly no textbooks on GR contain this area, such as Wald, MTW, Hawking, Carroll and Zee's. Can anyone ...
4
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1answer
175 views

Directional derivatives in the multivariable Taylor expansion of the translation operator

Let $T_\epsilon=e^{i \mathbf{\epsilon} P/ \hbar}$ an operator. Show that $T_\epsilon\Psi(\mathbf r)=\Psi(\mathbf r + \mathbf \epsilon)$. Where $P=-i\hbar \nabla$. Here's what I've gotten: ...
3
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1answer
63 views

Why do safety helmets have a softer inner layer nearer the head?

I know that when an object collides onto the helmet, it causes an inelastic collision so that energy is absorbed by the structure of the helmet, so what exactly does the softer inner layer do? Does it ...
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1answer
50 views

How similar is comparison between the principle behind Newton's Cradle versus AC Current moving down a transmission line?

Anyone who has taken high school physics has seen the following assembly. You drop one ball from the left hand side and the ball from the farthest right hand side gets knocked away. This is to ...
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0answers
31 views

The relation between angle of impact and scattering angle. The general formula [closed]

When two balls A and B collide (elastically) in 2-D and B is at rest, if their masses are equal ($m_a = m_b$), knowing the angle of impact $\gamma$ (for example 60°), we know that the scattering angle ...
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2answers
85 views

Is the energy of momentum stored physically? [closed]

While an object is moving, relativity will say it weighs more, especially so as it approaches light speed. The increase in energy is then easily sensed as an increase in mass (Almost as a rock in ...
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2answers
138 views

Momentum vector transformation

I am confused about the way momentum vector transforms in the following case: $$q_k \to q_k'= q_k + \epsilon f_k(q)$$ The Jacobian is thus $\Lambda_{ij} = \frac{\partial q'_i}{\partial q_j} \approx ...
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70 views

Motivating the ansatz for the infinitesimal translation operator

I'm reading Sakurai's Modern QM right now and in the first chapter he states a number of conditions required for a translation operator: unitarity, ...
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93 views

Will I be able to push a small object in front of me in the outer space?

Imagine I am standing on Earth, and pushing a tennis ball away from me. The ball moves. If it is very heavy, I will move back instead of the ball. Now consider the same scenario in outer space, where ...
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Different results to a basic question ( Newton's law and perservation of momentum)

Trolley with mass of $m_0=1 \ kg$ is moving without friction on the railway track. It is raining so there is a constant mass flow of water $\Phi_m=0.1\ kg/s$. Constant force $F=0.1 \ N$ is ...