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20
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4answers
31k views

What do ants see?

After watching some ants in my garden today, and then looking at this very illuminating demonstration, I got to wondering, about what they would see. Not specifically ants (I understand their ...
10
votes
3answers
892 views

Can we make images of single atoms?

I was wondering how far in imaging physics had gotten. Do we hold the technology to actually take a picture of, say, an alpha particle, or even a single atom? I realise we aren't talking about camera ...
9
votes
2answers
175 views

How do a microscope's optics expose defects in the user's vision?

I've got cataracts in both eyes. My vision is correctable to 20/30, so the cataracts are essentially a non-issue in daily living. But when I use a microscope, which I do daily, (binocular, zoom ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Which is the smallest known particle that scientists have actually *seen with their eyes*? [closed]

Which is the smallest particle that has been actually seen by the scientists? When I say "actually seen", (may be using some ultra advanced microscope or any other man made eye, using any wavelength ...
8
votes
0answers
383 views

Measurement of Tangential Momentum Accomodation?

(this question is a crosspost from theoretical physics.) I am using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterizing pores of the size of nanometers for application in gas flow. For this, knowing ...
7
votes
1answer
135 views

Has the Nobel committee mixed up this years prizes for Physics and Chemistry? [closed]

The title of the question is tongue-in-cheek but the question remains: How does the Nobel committee delineate the fields when awarding work which is of such an inter-disciplinary nature. The chemistry ...
6
votes
2answers
174 views

PSF Measurements In Fluorescence Imaging

Quite a technical question! I have measured the Point Spread Function of 100nm fluorescent breads with my Olympus scanning head. I'm two-photon exciting the beads with a wavelength of 800nm and ...
5
votes
1answer
171 views

Why does the colour of a thing change when under huge magnification?

For instance, this image: shows human eyelashes close up. The lashes look green, in fact the whole surface area has a strange tint of green Why is this?
5
votes
2answers
782 views

Optics alignment of a confocal scanning microscope

I am facing a challenge in my project regarding optical alignment. See the figure: The challenge is with the vertical optical system alignment. I considered placing a mirror and check back if the ...
5
votes
2answers
234 views

How does QM allow imaging of individual electron orbitals?

Question: Why does the uncertainty principle allow probing of characteristics specific to the electron orbital distribution? If you measure an electron's position/momentum, then after you measure ...
3
votes
5answers
224 views

Isn't all light polarised?

I apologize if my question does not make sense.(I'm teaching myself microscopy.) So reading Fundamentals of Light Microscopy and electronic imaging by Douglas&Murphy, at one point the author ...
3
votes
2answers
98 views

Can there be a string so thin as to be invisible, but that can still support a visible weight?

A spider web thread is very thin, yet it can support a spider. Given that the human eye visual acuity is finite, are there materials, natural or man-made, sufficiently thin that a string made from ...
3
votes
3answers
368 views

What if $\gamma$-rays in Electron microscope?

I was referring Electron microscopes and read that the electrons have wavelength way less than that of visible light. But, the question I can't find an answer was that, If gamma radiation has the ...
3
votes
1answer
827 views

How does an electron microscope work?

I am a physics novice. Google tells me that electron microscopes work much like their optical counterparts -- but the analogy falls apart for me when I think about what I'm "viewing." Obviously, you ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

What are these wavish patterns around atoms on microscopic images?

This is an IBM movie about how they move single atoms: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSCX78-8-q0 There are often some "wavish" pattern around atoms on these pictures, like below some of them marked ...
3
votes
0answers
36 views

Beating the Diffraction Limit with NSOM

I am trying to understand exactly why we can beat the diffraction limit when using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). For those who aren't familiar with NSOM, check out this article: ...
3
votes
0answers
14 views

Resolution Limit for Energy Transition Imaging

I understand that when imaging the resolution limit can be given by Ewald's sphere which is due to the maximum amount of momentum that can be transferred. But how can we come up with a resolution ...
2
votes
2answers
133 views

Resolving power of a microscope?

I was reading up on the resolution of a microscope. I read (in some lecture notes) that the size of the limiting spot size is $1.22 \lambda f/W$. But that the smallest resolvable feature has a size ...
2
votes
2answers
196 views

The purpose of auxiliary lens in microscope

Can someone explain me the purpose of auxiliary lens in microscope. The specification says: ...
2
votes
1answer
915 views

Dark and bright areas around atoms in a scanning tunnelling microscope image

Recently IBM created world’s smallest ever animation on an atomic scale video. Researchers made the animation using a scanning tunnelling microscope to move thousands of carbon monoxide molecules to ...
2
votes
1answer
353 views

Infinity Corrected Microscope - Building from Scratch

I took an optics course a few years back, and am trying to figure out how to build an infinity-corrected microscope from discrete optical components which are listed in references [2] (lenses) and [3] ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

What are the theoretical prerequisites for experimental work with SEM and TEM? [closed]

What level of knowledge and in what areas would be required to perform experimental work with an SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) and a TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) respectively? E.g. ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

Why do spatial filters use microscope objectives, and not other types of lenses?

A spatial filter is a device to 'clean up' a laser beam with an irregular intensity profile, and create a smooth Gaussian profile at the output. It is usually said (e.g. here) that you need a ...
2
votes
1answer
31 views

CARS microscopy

I have probably very naive question. In case of CARS microscopy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coherent_anti-Stokes_Raman_spectroscopy we have $ω_{pr}+ω_{p}-ω_{S}$, how can we have minus $ω_S$? In ...
1
vote
2answers
221 views

Microscopy types and techniques? [closed]

I didn't get the basic difference in between the different types of microscopy. for example there are several different microscopy techniques are available such as Bright field, Dark field, Confocal, ...
1
vote
1answer
156 views

Confocal Microscopy

In the context of Confocal Microscopy literature state, "spatial rejection of out of phase light".Is that mean only light which is pass through the pinhole is used and the rest is blocked ?
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Why subwavelength objects can not be seen with optical microscope?

What would happen if we would take a very small sphere around 200nm diameter and try to detect it from the most efficient optical microscope? Technically, the Rayleigh diffraction limit prevents the ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Why is there no fluorescence background in CARS?

In CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), the detected signal is blue-shifted with respect to the excitation - how does this mean that there is no fluorescence or that the fluorescence can be ...
1
vote
2answers
156 views

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields?

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields? If so can it be done around $-135°C$ zero?
1
vote
1answer
409 views

Does coverslip thickness matter for high NA oil immersion objectives?

This question is related to Impact of covering glass on lens performance. I use a 63x TIRF objective with a numerical aperture of 1.46 and oil immersion. The immersion oil has an index of ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

What is the importance of reciprocal lattice?

Reciprocal lattice is the diffraction plot of a crystal. Now with the STM instrument we can get the get the topology of the crystal, so what is the importance of reciprocal lattice or the Brillouin ...
1
vote
1answer
207 views

Scanning electron microscope imaging

In a scanning electron microscopy, secondary electrons are defined as the electrons which obey inelastic scattering whereas backscattering electron follow elastic scattering. Now my question ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

Electric Potential at nano scale

I’ve a got a question; and I am hopeful that you can provide any information or direct me to a better resource. I'm not a physicist; so please correct me if I'm wrong. Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) ...
1
vote
1answer
206 views

Calculating the magnification of an optical microscopy system

I have a microscopy system that is set up as follows : DSLR with a crop factor of 1.6x ( equivalent to magnification, I believe ) An adaptor optic, for attach the DSLR to the microscope, listed as a ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

To describe crystallity structures of this ferromagnetic material

MOKE microscope picture of the ferromagnetic Material $Co_{40} Fe_{40} B_{20}$ of 20 nm thin film All other pictures look the same, also from different angles: [0,360] by 15 degree separation. I ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Importance of thickness of SiO2-substrate for observing graphene's monolayer

I've discovered that one should use 300-nm-thick SiO2 substrate in order to effectively observe graphene's monolayer through optical microscope. If thickness differs even by 5%, i.e. 315 nm, then ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Microscopy: aperture matching and Huygen's principle

I have repeatedly read that the maximum spatial resolution of a microscope occurs when the aperture of the objective and condenser are the same. However, I don't understand why. The resolution is ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Software for analysing SEM or TEM images

I am looking for a software to analyse SEM and TEM images of some PLD experiments because I want to characterize the samples, like calculate the concentration of nanoparticles, size, and do some ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Nanooptics microscopy limit

The limit of microscopes is 200nm, but apparently STED improves this according to this coverage of the Kavil prizes 2014 : http://www.photonics.com/Article.aspx?AID=56255 What is the current limit ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

Improvement of microscope resolution with Oil [closed]

Why and when do we need to place oil over the sample to achieve higher optical resolution ? Is this idea is valid for the enhancement of all optical microscopy techniques and magnification scales ?
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Input parameters for the reconstruction algorithm in Digital Holography

I've been browsing some Digital Holography papers these days, and have come across this fundamental question. When you reconstruct the complex amplitude for the object image, you use e.g. Fresnel ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

Scaling an electron microscope to fit within 1 cubic cm when running multiple parallel scans [closed]

Yes, I'm serious. What components correspond to an individual scan vrs what components can be cascaded across all objects? Ex: The vacuum chamber can be cascaded ( colocate the sample chambers ...
0
votes
3answers
113 views

Do nanoscopes exist?

We are mostly all familiar with a microscope, and know that it helps to see MICRO components, like stuff that is photolithographically etched on silicon semiconductor die. (The latter can also be ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Which microscopy technique is for wet condition? [closed]

I am searching for a microscopy technique in wet conditions. It must be possible to see through the specimen. ESEM is good but can't see through. TEM needs high vacuum which will boil away water. The ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Resolution of experiment is lower than the detector, so how to weigh the data?

I am attempting to create an atomic model based on data from a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Basically you shoot electrons at bunch of identical molecules stuck to a grid, and look at the ...
0
votes
1answer
218 views

How long does it take to scan a typical scanning electron microscope image?

I suppose the answer depends on resolution and imaging area, but can you provide some ball park measures of imaging times with an SEM?
0
votes
1answer
146 views

Making or Demonstrating Principle of Electron Microscope

is it possible to either demonstrate the principle or make a SEM ( electron microscope ) at home or lab as an enthusiast?? and how can i start?
0
votes
1answer
17 views

What is bias voltage and what is it's function in a Scan Tunneling Microscope?

I was reading about the Scan Tunneling Microscope and I read that a 'bias voltage' is needed to realize a current of electrons between the needle and the sample. I don't know what the definition of ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

How does an electron beam condenser work?

For example, a scanning electron microscope has multiple condensers that "focus" the beam into a smaller spot size. How does a condenser actually change the direction of electron flow in a non-uniform ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Methods for determination of crystal lattice's homogeneity

I know of X-Ray diffraction, which produces a pattern corresponding to the inverse Fourier Transform of the lattice (reciprocal lattice). While this method is widely employed, it provides more ...