The variables used in general relativity to describe the shape of spacetime. If your question is about metric units, use the tag "units", and/or "si-units" if it is about the SI system specifically.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

4
votes
2answers
148 views

Performing Wick Rotation to get Euclidean action of scalar field

I'm working with the signature $(+,-,-,-)$ and with a Minkowski space-stime Lagrangian $$ \mathcal{L}_M = \Psi^\dagger\left(i\partial_0 + \frac{\nabla^2}{2m}\right)\Psi $$ The Minkowski action is $$ ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Geometric interpretation of zero metric [on hold]

What is the geometric interpretation of a metric vanishing at a point on a Riemannian manifold? What does it look like locally in the case of a surface?
18
votes
4answers
745 views

Interpretation of a singular metric

I'm interested to find out if we can say anything useful about spacetime at the singularity in the FLRW metric that occurs at $t = 0$. If I understand correctly, the FLRW spacetime is a combination ...
2
votes
3answers
223 views
0
votes
2answers
142 views

Why acceleration cannot vanish everywhere?

In attempt to introduce gr concepts When there are gravitational accelerations present, as for example in the gravitational field of the earth, the space cannot be the flat Minkowski space. Indeed, ...
4
votes
1answer
628 views

Why do people put exponentials there

In his book, Sean Carroll, says p. 194 chapter 5: To impose spherical symmetry, we begin b writing the metric of Minkowski space in polar coordinates $x^{\mu}=(t,r, \theta, \phi)$: $$ ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Minkowski's dot product

I am trying to deduce the Minkowski's dot product for two dimentional space: $$g=x^1y^1-c^2t_xt_y$$ If $f$ denote the Lorentz's transformation for two dimentional case: $$\begin{array}{rcll} ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Divergence of inverse of metric tensor

I know that the Levi-civita connection preserves the metric tensor. Is the divergence of the inverse of metric tensor zero, too?! I'm not so familiar with the divergence of the second ranked tensor. ...
3
votes
5answers
125 views

Local inertial frame

In general relativity we introduce local inertial frames to be such frames where the laws of special relativity holds. Let $\xi^{\alpha}$ the coordinates in the local inertial frame, so we get ...
4
votes
2answers
242 views

How to eliminate this cross term?

Given $$ds^2=-A(r)dt^2+B(r)dr^2+2C(r)drdt+D(r)r^2(d\theta^2+\sin^2d\phi^2),\tag{23.1}$$ How can we eliminate the cross term?
1
vote
2answers
115 views

What does diagonalization mean here?

In a gravity theory in spacetime, the metric has signature $− + +· · ·+$. Concretely this means that the metric tensor $g_{μν}$ may be diagonalized by an orthogonal transformation, i.e. ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Metric components transformation under change of coordinates

I have been studying Lie derivatives and some applications. While searching the web I found a refence with the following statement: For a general Riemannian manifold $M$, take a tangent vector field ...
1
vote
1answer
312 views

Higher-Dimensional Metrics in (Hyper)-Spherical Coordinates

I want to compute the components of the Riemann curvature tensor (for a case similar to the Schwarzschild solution) in 4 + 1 dimensions, but I want to use a higher-dimensional analogue of spherical ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Tensor indices and row and column labels of corresponding representation matrices

When reading undergraduate GR literature, I often see that the authors represent tensors ${\eta^\alpha}_{\beta}$, ${\eta^\beta}_{\alpha}$, $\eta_{\alpha \beta}$, $\eta^{\alpha \beta}$ as matrices. ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Is metric $g$ a representation of Lorentz group? What decides it's transformation properties?

I am confused what representation of Lorentz group does a metric transform under? How does it's transformation properties are decided?
0
votes
2answers
119 views

Coordinate Singularity in Metric

Suppose I have some metric $$ds^2=g(t)dt^2+\frac{1}{r}dr^2$$ which has a singularity at $r=0$. However, if I make the coordinate transformation $u=\frac{1}{r}$, then I get: $$ds^2=g(t)dt^2+r^3 ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Maintaining symmetry? [closed]

Minkowski metric is found to be $$ds^2=-dt^2+dr^2+r^2d\Omega^2$$ where $d\Omega^2$ is the metric on a unit two-sphere. Why should we keep track of the $d\Omega^2$ so that spherical symmetry holds ...
5
votes
2answers
312 views

Lorentz invariance of the Minkowski metric

As far as I understand, one requires that in order for the scalar product between two vectors to be invariant under Lorentz transformations $x^{\mu}\rightarrow ...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

How can I mathematically describe the parallel transport in the Roman soldiers example?

I've been trying to understand parallel transport. Many of the descriptions present a mathematical version: $\nabla_V X = 0$. And/or they present an example involving soldiers (usually Roman) ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

When is the event horizon a Killing horizon?

I know the definition of both (event horizon is closure of causal past of future null infinity whilst Killing horizon is a null surface where some Killing vector becomes null e.g. the surface where it ...
-1
votes
1answer
49 views

Minkowski metric: Why does it look like it does? [duplicate]

I have been searching for why would we even start with Minkowski spacetime metric as being written as: $$ds^2=-dt^2+dx^2+dy^2+dz^2.$$ No really, so why would we have a negative sign for temporal ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

General relativity degrees of freedom — simplified version?

I'm afraid my question may be too general, but I would like to ask how I could find out the degrees of freedom in a given tensor. I have had this question since I started studying GR. At first, I ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Mode expansions of fields

This is a very simple question but would appreciate it if someone could clarify - I've heard different things from different people so I'm a little bit confused yet the question is simple: Given the ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Calculate lapse function from the metric

I have a technical question about the lapse function: Assume I have some given (Lorentzian) metric $g$. I have seen the following definition of the lapse function $\alpha^{-2}=-g(\nabla f, \nabla ...
-1
votes
1answer
93 views

Weyl scalar calculation

I'm trying to compute Weyl scalars, but don't really understand the formulae for them, in the sense I don't understand how to compute them. Let's take ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

Derivation of Schwarzschild metric using the full machinery of differential geometry [closed]

How would one derive the Schwarzschild metric using the full machinery of differential geometry, using the component approach as little as possible? Something along these lines: Begin with a manifold ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

What is the metric tensor for?

I am wondering how to use the metric tensor, in practice? I read the book and done the exercises in A student's guide to vectors and tensors by Dan Fleisch. The concept of a tensor and their ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Weyl Transformations and Group actions [migrated]

I have the following question. Let $(M,g_{ab})$ be a Riemannian manifold $M$ with metric $g$, and with an action of a Lie group $G$. Moreover, the Riemannian metric $g_{ab}$ is taken to be invariant ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Why do we introduce the idea of manifold in GR books

After reading Timaeus answer here: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1302672/compound-map-in-manifolds, I got an idea that spacetime we usually talk about in GR can be described as a manifold. ...
3
votes
3answers
499 views

Clarifying what metric counts as flat space

In (2D) Cartesian coordinates, the Euclidean metric... $$\begin{bmatrix} 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \end{bmatrix}$$ ...is flat space. If the diagonal elements are exchanged for other real numbers ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

Why pseudo-Riemannian metric cannot define a topology?

It is not clear for me why a positive definite metric is necessary to define a topology as noted in some textbooks like the one by Carroll. Does this imply that in cosmology, say through FLRW metric, ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

When the equations of motion are not unique (eg. when they are given by eigenvectors), which will the free particle adhere to?

For this question I think it will be easier to express the usual equation describing the motion of a "free particle,"--viz. $g_{ij}\dot{x}^i\dot{x}^j$--in matrix form as follows: ...
3
votes
2answers
72 views

Does metric signature affect the stress energy tensor?

If one were to derive the stress-energy tensor for a metric with $(+,-,-,-)$ signature would it be different from the stress-energy tensor derived from the same metric but with $(-,+,+,+)$ signature?
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Time independent Kerr metric

The Kerr metric expressed in terms of polar coordinates $r,\theta,\phi$, such that $x = r\sin(\theta)\cos(\phi)$, $y = r\sin(\theta)\sin(\phi)$, $z = r\cos(\theta)$. Then the Kerr metric is given as ...
1
vote
4answers
136 views

Which tensor describes curvature in 4D spacetime?

I heard these two statements which don't work together (in my mind): In 4D spacetime the curvature is encoded within the Riemann tensor. He holds all the information about curvature in spacetime. ...
22
votes
1answer
1k views

Causality and how it fits in with relativity

I was talking to my teacher the other day about Einstein's spacetime and there's one thing he couldn't explain about the nature of Cause. I may be being stupid or just unable to comprehend, thanks for ...
1
vote
3answers
128 views

Covariant and contravariant 4-vector in special relativity

I've just learned about contra- and covariant vector in the context of special relativity (in electrodynamic) and I'm struggling with some concept. From what I found, an intuitive definition of ...
5
votes
1answer
109 views

Simple metric of stellar collapse

Is there a simple metric (Lorentzian manifold) known which exhibits the formation of a black hole while not having any white hole counterpart and which moreover satisfies the strong and dominant ...
1
vote
1answer
128 views

Minkowski space-time

Suppose we have the vector space $\mathbb{R}^4$ and the Lorentz's transformation $f:\mathbb{R}^4\to\mathbb{R}^4$. Consider a inner product $g$ given by: $$g(x,y)=x^1y^1+x^2y^2+x^3y^3-c^2t^1t^2$$ for ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Why is $|\Lambda^0_0| \ge 1$ for a Lorentz transformation?

I'm taking a course of QFT and in the notes that the professor gave us he says that for a Lorentz transformation $\Lambda^\mu_\nu$ we have $|\Lambda^0_0| \ge 1$. He doesn't give further information ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

Killing field in Minkowski space-time

If we look at the killing equation for a vector field $X$ in $\mathbb{R}^{(p,q)}$ (or on an open subset thereof) in coordinates with constant diagonal pseudo-metric we get: ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How to calculate the event horizon and the cosmological radius in a metric?

From reading about general relativity, the event horizon and the cosmological radius are the radius when $f(r)=0$, in the metric $$ ds^{2}=-f(r)dt^{2}+\frac{dr^{2}}{f(r)}+r^{2}d\Omega^{2} $$ However, ...
1
vote
3answers
134 views

What is the physical meaning of the Levi-Civita connection?

I'm taking a course in General Relativity and I have studied the fundamental theorem of Riemannian geometry: Let $M$ be a manifold with metric $g$. Then exists an unique torsion-free connection ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Why is not the D'Alembert operator a scalar?

I am taking a course on classical electrodynamics and my professor has defined the D'Alembert operator to me as: $$\square=\eta^{\mu \nu} \partial_{\mu} \partial_{\nu}$$ I have been operating using ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Euler-Lagrange for simple scalar field (Peskin & Shroeder)

I'm reading Peskin & Schroeder and they give as a simple example the Lagrangian $$\mathcal{L} = \frac{1}{2} (\partial_\mu \phi)^2$$ First of all, I'm guessing that $(\partial_\mu \phi)^2$ is ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

What exactly does the Kretschmann scalar implies and how does it work?

From the General Relativity class lectures I understood that this particular invariant, the Kretschmann scalar namely $$R_{\mu\nu\lambda\rho} R^{\mu\nu\lambda\rho}$$ is really important because, ...
2
votes
1answer
265 views

Perfect fluid and Cauchy momentum equation

The stress-energy tensor of a perfect fluid is given by $$T^{\mu\nu}=\left(\rho+pc^{-2}\right)u^\mu u^\nu+pg^{\mu\nu}$$ The divergence of the stress-energy tensor is zero: $\nabla_\mu T^{\mu\nu}=0$. ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

For a giving metric in GR, how do we learn which observer the metric refer to?

For example, I have been told the Schwarzschild observer is far away from blackhole and events,(namely, I think, the observer is static at infinity of the coordinate.) And the second example,the ...
1
vote
1answer
167 views

How to find a metric of a general observer?

Yes, that's it. How to find a particular metric of an observer in general relativity? Let's say we have a static metric: ...
2
votes
5answers
221 views

Is boundary well defined if variation of metric don't vanish on the boundary?

Suppose that you want to calculate the variation $\delta S$ of an action induced by some arbitrary variation $\delta g_{\mu \nu}$ of the spacetime metric : \begin{equation} S = \int_{\Omega} ...