The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
11 views

Exact expression for the coefficient in Bloch-Grüneisen (BG) formula?

In most representations of the BG formula, there is a coefficient (usually left vague as an experimental parameter, but sometimes written out "analytically") in front of the integral: $$\rho=\rho_0 +A ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Why don't HCP metals have a brittle-to-ductile temperature transition?

I thought it had to do with the amount of slip systems...because BCC doesn't have as many slip planes, it cracks at low temperatures, while FCC has enough slip planes that it is not dependent upon ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Why do we use the Einstein Solid for the heat capacity of metals at high T?

I am not sure how to best formulate this question, but see the title? What physical reason (or what equation can I look at) to see that, at high temperatures, all the electrons will oscillate with the ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Wave propagation in 2D metal cavity

I would like to know there is an analytic solution for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in metals in a 2D case. The 1D case is well known to lead to a traveling wave with exponential decay ...
4
votes
2answers
94 views

What is the most efficient way to use a blow torch?

Let's start with a torch and a piece of titanium. What is the fastest way to get the titanium up to red hot? Whenever I ask my science-y friends they like to point out that the bright blue tip is ...
-2
votes
0answers
32 views

Conduction band in solid material

In an any solid material like metal or nonmetal, the atoms are closely placed. There are two important band in metals and nonmetals called the conduction band, and the valence band. We know that ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

When metal solidified, why is its surface not flat like polished?

I expect that what one can see on the outside of a just solidified piece of metal is just the "raw" surface of the inner stucture. Solidifying metals or alloys arranges in partial christal latices ...
3
votes
1answer
33 views

Reflection, Transmission, and Plasma Frequency

Does anyone have a good, clear explanation of why and how this works? I don't understand the following. Say you have a piece of metal with a plasma frequency $\omega_p$. This is like a resonant ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Does hardening reduce the ductility of a metal?

Is hardening equivalent with reducing the ductility of a metal and improving the yield strength of it?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

What is an isostatic gas?

I'm learning about Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), but I don't understand what an isostatic gas is. Can someone help me?
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Can lightning actually weld fillings in your teeth?

So, I remember sometime in my childhood, someone was teaching me about lightning safety, and they explained that it was important to crouch low but keep as little contact with the ground as possible, ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Does wetting of fabric surfaces depend on the microscopic surface structure?

I am trying to coat a polymer fabric with a metal alloy by dipping it into the molten metal. (For example a polyamide like Nylon in eutectic Bi/Sn alloy at 138°C , as in Wetting the surface for ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

How is spring steel so hard?

The mechanical properties of a steel object are influenced by the metal composition, the manufacturing process, and the final heat treatment of the object. Spring steel is a steel that was heat ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

The outside of a steel teapot is hot to touch. Does this mean that the water inside is necessarily at least as hot?

Some teapots, like this one Are made from thin steel which conducts the heat of the teapot quite well, meaning that you can't comfortable hold the sides while they're full of hot water. Tonight I ...
5
votes
3answers
712 views

How hot can metal get in sunlight? [closed]

I will make some 5mm blackened steel letters for a building. Now, in the sunlight in summer, how hot can they get? EDIT: i want to place some LEDs on the back of the letters. now the question is if ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Does the Photoelectric Effect cause any kind of decay?

From my understanding, the Photoelectric Effect knocks electrons off of some metal using photons. Since electrons are being thrown out of the metal, does this cause some kind of decay?
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Wetting the surface for soaking Nylon fabric in metal

I'm trying to create metal covered lace. My sister would use it as an artistic material. An interesting material A relevant point is that the mechanical rigidity of the metal is used, so it is not ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

What actually happens when electrons 'collide' with other electrons in a conductor to produce heat in an electrical circuit?

Textbooks describe resistance as involving electrons colliding with other ions in metals, resulting in a heating effect, though how exactly is this achieved? Although I am not required to learn the ...
4
votes
1answer
38 views

Temperature effects on lead against radiation

I would like to know if bringing lead to near absolute zero temperatures would have any affects on how resistive it is against gamma radiation. It takes 40 centimeters of lead to reduce gamma ...
2
votes
3answers
360 views

How does the number of electrons and protons determine the melting point and hardness of a solid?

How does the number of electrons, neutrons and protons determine the melting point and hardness of a solid/metal? And is it possible to create custom elements which is very strong and have very high ...
5
votes
1answer
91 views

Why does aluminium-on-glass mirror work without distortion?

I have read an article about glass (zerodur) with low thermal expansion coefficient. It is mentioned that large casts of such glass are covered with reflective layer of Aluminium and used as mirrors ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Electrical conductivity of metals on heating

What effect does heating have on metals (to be specific, on the electrical conductivity) ? And why does it have that effect?
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What is the work-function of a monolayer metal on a substrate with charge redistribution at the interface?

The work-function on subsrate/metal with nm thick (or above) metal layer generally reveal the intrinsic work-funtion of bulk metal. But what if there is a monolayer thick metal, and there is charge ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

If we hit an electron will it go to an excited state?

For example i have a block of silicon doped with phosphorous and i hit it hard with a hammer will the energy get transfered to the block and make the electrons excited?
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Why does Ohm's law ignore the Lorentz force?

For example, the usual derivation of the complex dielectric constant of metals (using the Drude model) makes use of the Ohm's law in the Maxwell's equations, but what is never mentioned is why they ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Why metals fused in vacuum? [duplicate]

On Earth when two pieces of metal comes into direct contact with each other, nothing amazing happens. In a complete vacuum condition the two metals fused permanently, how and why?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

How does the Hutchinson Effect work? [closed]

I have seen pictures online of metal ripped apart and metal completely messed up due to the Hutchinson Effect. How does this effect work and what are the other principles behind it?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

relation between chemically activity and work function and fermi level

I am trying to connect the following concepts together : "being chemically active", "work function" and "fermi level" I want to know if for a metal, "being chemically active" is equivalent to "its ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Is there any relation between temperature dependence of resistance and fermi energy in metals?

Given that the resistance varies linearly with temperature in metals, is there any way we can calculate the Fermi energy from this information?
0
votes
1answer
29 views

currents in an isolated metal exposed to an alternating uniform electric field

For example, let's look at a metal sphere between a capacitor's (infinite) plates. Let's run an AC current through the capacitor, resulting in an oscillating electric field. The charges will move in ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Lindhard function for surface plasmon

Is there anybody that knows how to calculate the Lindhard function for the surface plasmon (between the surface of two metals of different dielectrics)? What I'm looking for is to find this function ...
14
votes
1answer
3k views

When heat is applied to the top of a stack of pennies, why does the bottom penny melt first?

I just watched this video where a blow torch is used on the top of a stack of pennies. I'd like to know why the bottom penny melted first.
1
vote
3answers
150 views

Is there any material that is NOT conductive and IS magnetically attractive?

Is there any material which is NOT conductive and IS magnetically attractive? I am in need of a material which I can shape and use within a machine. It must be very attracted to magnets similarly to ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does a gold leaf appear blue if made very thin?

Is this to do with excitation of electrons and emission of photons? Or is it more to do with the structure of the gold I.e. Only small wavelengths being able to pass through gaps between atoms? EDIT: ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Do Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) work harden?

We had a piece of this thin Shape Memory Alloy in class, (I think it was called nitinol, but I think thats a brand name) the teacher showed how it is very flexible and springy, and will return to it's ...
2
votes
2answers
99 views

Can work hardening of a metal be avoided?

My left earbud recently broke mid-wire: the bit that I like to fiddle with and bend. I fixed it, but I was wondering whether there are metals that don't work harden, or resistant to it? Is there a ...
1
vote
1answer
121 views

Can metal rods detect underground wires?

Until not long ago, I was working in the drilling and infrastructure business. Some people I was working with used metal rods as a "quick and dirty" method of detecting underground wiring, before ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Does illuminating a conductor with light energy less than its workfunction change the measured conductivity?

For example, does the light absorbed in an exposed metal wire increase the average velocity of the electrons, hence increasing mobility and conductance?
1
vote
4answers
114 views

Measuring electric conductivity

My daughter is doing a science experiment on which metal (e.g., copper, silver, aluminum, iron) has maximum electric conductivity. We are assuming we can accomplish this by using different metal, 3 to ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Why are some elemental materials grey?

How does grey occur in elemental materials such as metals? I believe that grey arises from the simultaneous reflection and absorption of all colors of the spectrum (in different atoms of course), as ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Free vs Bound Charges, especially in metals

Are conduction band electrons in metals generally considered free charges or bound charges for E&M purposes? I'm not asking about freedom in the sense of being able to escape the potential well ...
1
vote
2answers
238 views

Why does room temperature water and metal feel almost as cool as each other?

From what I've read about heat, temperature and conductivity, I understand that the reason water at room temperature feels colder than most other things at the same temperature (like wood, air, ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Like viscoelastic polymers, why there are not storage and loss moduli for cast iron?

Viscoelastic polymers have different paths upon loading and unloading, so there is energy dissipation, so they have storage and loss moduli. Plastic behavior is also shown by cast iron: loading and ...
4
votes
3answers
123 views

What happens to the electrons when metal gets cut or broken?

For example, if I take an iron rod (or thread) and cut it in half, could it happen that one side remains with an extra electron or would it balance out too fast? If possible, do the parts simply ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

How to calculate the speed of electrons in a metal

According to the Sommerfeld model, the electrons on the Fermi level has the relation $$ \epsilon_F=\frac{\hbar^2k_F^2}{2m_e}=\frac{1}{2}m_ev_F^2 $$ i.e. $\hbar k_F=m_ev_F$ with $k_F=(3\pi^2n)^{1/3}$ ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

If an common metal is induced with a static dipole moment, won't the the positive side be weaker?

To my knowledge, common metals with metallic bonding is formed through free electrons within its lattice structure. If say we are to shift the free roaming electrons to one side and therefore minutely ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Why does carbon alloy with iron specifically?

Everyone knows what an alloy is: it's a metal made by melting two (or more) other metals together. Unless of course you're talking about steel. That's a metal made by mixing carbon (very much not a ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Will a sodium bell ring clearly after being submerged in liquid nitrogen?

Lead is fairly soft at room temperature but rings clearly when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. Sodium is even softer. If cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature, could it also ring?
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Physical sides of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation as nonlinear in metal

This Wikipedia page says that the electromagnetic wave propagation in air can be done by Freshnel transform: $$U_{0}(x,y) = - \frac{j}{\lambda} \frac{e^{jkz}}{z} \int\limits_{-\infty}^{\infty} ...
9
votes
3answers
274 views

Why are permanent magnets permanent?

Let me see if I get it right. When an iron bar is attracted by a permanent magnet it becomes a magnet itself because all of its magnetic domains start to point in the same direction. When the iron bar ...