The result of sampling the property of a system

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159 views

Combining ±% with ±dB in measurement uncertainty

Firstly apologies if this is not the correct place to post this but wasn't sure which site would be good to ask regarding about measurement uncertainty calculation. I am trying to calculate the ...
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23 views

Cosmic ray noise, strategic cancellation

With the radio telescopes, we measure the radio waves produced by every solar fluctuation in the near universe, which as I understand is heard similar to radio static we experience in tuning to a non ...
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100 views

How to specify BRDF measurement

As a person who will be using the scattering measurement results (in Zemax), I was asked to prepare the specs for the BRDF measurement. However I've never done it until now, so help would be greatly ...
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1answer
351 views

How to convert acceleration in g to speed velocity in meter /s [closed]

I'm working on an inertial measurement unit with some MEM'S component. I want to retrieve data on a micro-controller. I have 3-axis accelerometer sensor. however I want retrieve data in $mg$ ( ...
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1answer
323 views

Measurement using Vernier Callipers [closed]

The diameter of a cylinder is measured using a Vernier Callipers with no zero error. It is found that the zero of the Vernier scale lies between 5.10 cm and 5.15 cm of the main scale. The Vernier ...
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1answer
54 views

Significant figures in measurement with error

Someone can explain me what's the rule behind the correct expression of a quantity $K$ with its error $\Delta K$ as $K \pm \Delta K$? They must have the same number of significant figures? Or the ...
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1answer
68 views

Pendulum Confusion

This text in my book is pretty confusing:With my emphasis A simple pendulum is a heavy point mass (bob) suspended from a rigid support by a massless and inextensible string. This is an ideal case ...
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1answer
38 views

Probablilites for wave function collapse

From what I understand, superposition is when two states exist in all of their possible forms simultaneously until the moment of wave function collapse, when they essentially reduce into a single ...
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2answers
111 views

What can be measured or derived about a remote magnetic field? [closed]

This question related to Why are magnetic lines of force invisible? and is motivated by a comment of @BlackbodyBlacklight, based on that, the illustrating example may depend on that linked question as ...
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55 views

What is the shortest controllable time?

I was reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_time and noticed a reference to: http://phys.org/news192909576.html where it is stated that: 12 attoseconds is the world record for shortest ...
2
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1answer
90 views

Probability of measuring two observables in a mixed state

Lets say i have density Matrix on the usual base $$ \rho = \left( \begin{array}{cccc} \frac{3}{14} & \frac{3}{14} & 0 & 0 \\ \frac{3}{14} & \frac{3}{14} & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & ...
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26 views

Is there a general term for the situation where an improperly chosen measurement range results in a bias?

For example, consider the following measurement: A sensor can measure a specific physical quantity, and has a range of $0$ to $100$. All values above $100$ will be shown as 100. We now take the ...
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5answers
256 views

What's the difference between $10\%$ of $10\text{ cm}$ and $1\text{ cm}$?

I overhead a physics professor at my university on the phone: I interviewed that student you sent me, but he didn't know the difference between increasing the length of a $10\text{ cm}$ rod by ...
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0answers
35 views

What can I say about compatibility between predictions and results?

If I have these theoretical predictions: \begin{align} \omega_{p_1} = 4.5132 \pm 0.0003~\text{rad/s} && \omega_{p_2} = 4.5145 \pm 0.0002~\text{rad/s}\\ \omega_{b_1} = 0.0707 \pm ...
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1answer
44 views

Small question about accuracy and precision

Let's say I have a law like this, $$D=\frac{c}{r}$$ where $c$ is a constant, $r$ a distance in meter. my measures of $r$ are [$0.02m$, $0.01m$], then $<r>=0.015m$ and $\delta r = \pm 0.005m$. So ...
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4answers
405 views

Can a thermometer really measure the temperature of a substance?

When we measure the temperature of a substance by using a thermometer and waiting until the two come into thermal equilibrium, the thermometer will not display the original temperature of the ...
2
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48 views

sensitive scale & resistance of analog current meter

Does the resistance of an analog current meter increase or decrease when it is set to a more sensitive scale (lower range)?
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10answers
337 views

Could one measure a stick to an arbitrary precision by having its length estimated by enough people?

I remember reading somewhere that the problem of exact time-keeping on ships could have been solved a lot earlier than it was if somebody would have had the idea of keeping time with a whole array of ...
2
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1answer
506 views

Non-Hermitian operator with real eigenvalues?

So we know that in Quantum Mechanics we require the operators to be Hermitian, so that their eigenvalues are real ($\in \mathbb{R}$) because they correspond to observables. What about a non-Hermitian ...
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0answers
58 views

Measuring CO2 concentration from a respiration chamber

I am interested in measuring the concentration of CO2 from an open circuit respiration chamber where a sheep is living. Known variables: Concentration of CO2 of the air entering the chamber. ...
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1answer
80 views

The value of one atomic mass unit

In my textbook, it is given: 1 atomic mass unit equals $1/12$th mass of one carbon 12-atom. Since mass of $6.02 * 10^{26}$ atoms of carbon-12 is $12\space\text{kg}$. Thus, $$1 \text{ a.m.u ...
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2answers
239 views

Why does a microphone membrane only measure pressure and not particle velocity?

Microphones (e.g. condenser microphone) are assumed to have a voltage output proportional to the sound pressure at the diaphragm. If the operating principle is that the voltage output is proportional ...
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0answers
37 views

What is weak coupling of photon polarization to a pointer?

This question is refered to those who are familiar with the concept of weak measurement. In short: How can the polarization of a photon be coupled to the position of a pointer state? What is the ...
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0answers
47 views

How to formulate collapse in polarization subspace of a photon?

I am wondering how to describe the collapse of a photon state when it is measured in the polarization degree of freedom (say by a filter which let pass just one particular polarisation). Let the free ...
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1answer
106 views

Measuring a fluctuating quantity: Instrument error vs. uncertainty, or both?

Say I am measuring a quantity $x$ in physical system whose true value is approximately sinusoidal in time. I have an instrument to sample this quantity, for which the manufacturer gives an accuracy ...
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1answer
99 views

Blood Viscosity

When measuring blood viscosity, the literature claims that we generally use a cone-and-plate viscometer. Why is this; is there any way to explain this mathematically in terms of the shear rate, etc? ...
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0answers
53 views

need data-point: count rate of APD (avalanche photo-diode) for specific aperture and stellar magnitude

I hope lab / experimental physics is fair game for this web-site. If not, sorry! I'm designing a sensor system to perform specialized [astronomy and space-sciences] experiments, and need a "reality ...
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1answer
452 views

Effect of waters changing specific gravity on objects apparent weight placed in liquid

My goal is to monitor the change in specific gravity of a liquid over a period of time. My question is: What are the appropriate formula for determining expected apparent weight of an object immersed ...
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1answer
40 views

Error analysis and how values in references are determined

Question 1:Most science textbooks have appendixes that have a value for some physical property of some object. This includes diameter of electrons, viscosity of fluids, boiling points, etc. My ...
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2answers
249 views

Shouldn't the Uncertainty Principle be intuitively obvious, at least when talking about the position and momentum of an object?

Please forgive me if I'm wrong, as I have no formal physics training (apart from some in high school and personal reading), but there's something about Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle that strikes ...
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5answers
99 views

Addition according to significant digits

I have been studying about significant digits and addition rules and I can't quite digest the rules of addition completely. It states that in the answer number of decimal places will be equal to the ...
3
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2answers
205 views

Significant figures vs. absolute error

On NIST Avogadro's Number, $N_A = 6.022\;141\;29 \times 10^{23} \text{ mol}^{-1}$ has 9 significant figures and a standard uncertainty of $0.000\;000\;27 \times 10^{23} \text{ mol}^{-1}$. First, can ...
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1answer
91 views

How does laser induced fluorescence in excited atoms work?

Atomic clocks use laser induced fluorescence in order to detect excited atoms, how does this work? Apparently the clocks need to detect the states of nearly 100% of the atoms being examined. In an ...
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1answer
52 views

Rotation speed measurment

Could anyone please explain with simply how we can measure the rotation speed of an object using the Sagnac Interferometer ?
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1answer
321 views

Is it possible to use induction ampermeter to measure power consumption of electric water heater and dryer?

I hope this practical question is not OT and not too trivial for this forum. I am renting an apartment in a duplex with a shared water heater and dryer. Turns out, both water heater and the dryer are ...
2
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2answers
350 views

Accuracy and Error of Atomic Clocks

I'm quoting a passage from my notes: The development of clocks based on atomic oscillations allowed measures of timing with accuracy on the order of $1$ part in $10^{14}$, corresponding to errors ...
2
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2answers
348 views

Which is smallest distance measurement which makes sense talking about [duplicate]

This might seem a silly question, but here it goes: Of all possible values for a measure of distance, which is the smallest that makes sense talking about? I mean, I could talk about $10^{-100000}$ ...
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2answers
197 views

How to estimate a person's mass from a sensor? [closed]

I'm trying to estimate the person's weight from some available sensors and I have an accelerometer, a gyrometer and a magnetometer. The triaxial accelerometer is fixed in a band in the person's ...
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2answers
44 views

Measuring radon level

In theory what are the techniques used to measure the levels of radon in air? On which principle/law do they rely?
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2answers
93 views

Can stress be observed directly?

Strain can be directly observed using e.g. a ruler. Can (internal) stress be directly observed?
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1answer
44 views

Charge or Charges on the oil droplets?

Due to my poor understanding of various paper and other material provided by google on Millikan's oil drop experiment I ask the following question here. As the drops were charged by either friction ...
7
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1answer
241 views

Is it feasible to measure the energy of cosmic ray muons with a consumer Digital Single Lens Reflex camera?

I have read this article SIBBERNSEN, Kendra. Catching Cosmic Rays with a DSLR. Astronomy Education Review, 2010, 9: 010111. and it talks about estimating the muon cosmic ray flux by means of a DSLR ...
4
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2answers
134 views

How does QFT help with defining measurement in Quantum Mechanics?

I learned that a quantum system has an "overall state", a vector in a Hilbert space. That Hilbert space can be decomposed in a basis of "basic states". For example if in the Universe there is only a ...
3
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1answer
106 views

How to measure the mass of the electron?

I've done a little bit of research and it seems Millikan was able to measure the ratio between the charge of the electron and its mass. But how can one measure one of the two constants to get the ...
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1answer
66 views

Resampling spectral data?

I want to use the CIE CMFs (Color Matching Functions) provided here: http://www.cvrl.org/cmfs.htm With data from my spectrometer in 10 nm increments. However, the CMFs are only provided at 5 nm ...
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0answers
55 views

Weighted average whenever a variance is 0? [closed]

So I have data for the number of times a certain event happens. Each column is a different event and each row is one trial. A sample of data would look like \begin{bmatrix} 1& 4& 7& ...
1
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1answer
219 views

Why is the angle of a triangular prism equal to the result of the following 2 calculations? (Experiment with optical goniometer)

I know there are two ways of measuring the angle of a prism with a goniometer: let the collimator shine (monochromatic) light on 2 sides of the prism and measure the angle between the 2 reflected ...
1
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1answer
161 views

Expectation values in QFT?

What is the meaning of different expectation values in QFT? For instance: $$\langle 0|{\cal O}(0)|q,s\rangle$$ or $$\langle 0|{\cal O}(0)|0\rangle$$ with ${\cal O}$ being some operator and ...
2
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1answer
90 views

Uncertainty on a single observable measurement

Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle states (in the form of the Robertson-Schroedinger Formula) that measurement of two non-commuting observables has a limiting precision, even for flawless measurement ...
3
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2answers
156 views

How do you measure proton's spin? [duplicate]

I've probably read it somewhere in Sakurai but I cannot recall it at the moment. So how does one really measure the proton's spin? I mean the proton's spin and not its constituents. Do you measure ...