The four fundamental fundamental equations of electromagnetism.

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Maxwell equations in 2+1 D

I have a problem with the Maxwell equations in (2+1) dimensions using differential form. Following J. Baez "Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity" page 93 (or any other book), the equations are ...
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1answer
58 views

Why do these calculations of EM fields for a magnet and wire loop seem inconsistent?

Suppose you have a conducting circular wire loop and a magnet moving towards each other. They move along the $z$ direction with nonrelativistic constant speed $v$. Let the $B$ field of the magnet in ...
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38 views

RF cavity Field Maps using Poisson Superfish

This may be a slightly obscure question but I'm trying to use Poisson Superfish to generate field maps for single cell of an ILC SRF Cavity. There are examples in the documentation for radio ...
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1answer
172 views

Why do magnetic field lines describe a force?

My professor stated the four Maxwell equations, as well as the "Lorentz force" equation $$ \mathbf{F} = q\left(\mathbf{E}+\frac{1}{c}\mathbf{v} \wedge\mathbf{B}\right) \tag{1} $$ He said that this ...
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1answer
100 views

Motion of Thompson's jumping ring

Thompson's jumping ring experiment is set up as follows: There is a force acting on the ring $F(x)$ where $x$ is the vertical displacement. The force is due to the $90^\circ$ out of phase flux ...
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1answer
35 views

What are some of the empirical proofs of electromagnetic polarization? [closed]

I am aware of how polarization follows from Maxwell's equations, and how it is possible in transverse waves in general. I also know that Huygens, in his great Treatise on Light, first discovered and ...
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1answer
46 views

Demonstration for the existence of longitudinal electrostatic oscillations

How could I demonstrate that in a linear, homogeneous and isotropic medium without losses but electrically charged, Maxwell's equation admit as solutions longitudinal electromagnetic waves, beyond ...
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1answer
53 views

Determining the phase delay between H and E fields

I want to determine the phase delay between H and E fields in a medium with losses and not electrically charged. In this medium we also have $\sigma_c\approx \varepsilon \omega$. The enunciation of ...
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1answer
130 views

how do photons move with respect to EM (I'd like to picture wave magnitudes frame by frame) [duplicate]

(I'm aware treating photon as particle and talking about its position is not exactly, conceptually right but I think it makes sense, at least in the point of view of a beginner. Please just assume ...
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3answers
173 views

How to propagate $E_x (x,t) = \exp(-t^2/\tau^2-i\omega_0 t) \exp(-x^2/w_0^2)$ in finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis

Finite difference time domain (FDTD) allows to solve differential equations for time evolution. For example, we can analyze ultra-short pulses in free space by solving the Maxwell's equations. The ...
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61 views

Distribution of current, charge and EM radiation from a centrally AC fed ball-shaped antenna

As far as I can understand, it is generally accepted that every classical electromagnetic phenomena can be explained by five equations: Maxwell's four equations and the Lorentz force law. However you ...
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25 views

Effective Medium

Please consider the following problem : A plane wave of wavenumber k is incident on an infinite slab which is inhomogeneous in the z direction. Also assume harmonic time dependence and that the ...
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1answer
59 views

How far will a 1Hz EM Wave propagate if it's source oscillator is running for exactly one second? [closed]

If you have an Oscillator set on 1Hz and you let it run for exactly one second connected to an Antenna , how far will the generated EM Wave travel ?
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1answer
253 views

Reaction-at-a-distance: Do charged plates immediately repel each other?

Imagine that we have a pair of parallel plates, $A$ and $B$, separated by some distance as in Fig. $1$ above. At time $t_1$ we simultaneously charge both the plates. This could be done by ...
7
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1answer
553 views

Do photons decay as they travel in free space

From maxwell's equations, it occurred to me that photons are stable. Decrease in electric field creates magnetic field and vice versa and somehow there is a harmony that allows photon to exist as long ...
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4answers
5k views

How wrong are the classical Maxwell's equations (as compared to QED)?

Now, I don't really mean to say that Maxwell's equations are wrong. I know Maxwell's equations are very accurate when it comes to predicting physical phenomena, but going through high school and now ...
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1answer
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How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?

How can KVL (Kirchhoff's Voltage Law) & KCL (Kirchhoff's Current law) be derived from Maxwell equations in lumped circuits? (Lumped network: if $d$ is the largest dimension of the network and ...
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2answers
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Does displacement current exist after the capacitor gets fully charged?

The displacement current is due to changing electric field. Since, after the capacitor gets fully charged there is no changing electric field there is no displacement current.(capacitor connected to a ...
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3answers
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Curl of an electromagnetic wave

I can't understand the concept of the curl of an electromagnetic wave. $$ \nabla \times E = -\frac{\partial \textbf{B}}{\partial t} $$ All of the examples I find show a current through a conductor, ...
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1answer
42 views

In magnetostatics, is there any relation between flux and current?

I have noted while trying to find analogy between electrostatics and magnetostatics, for the equation, flux = charge/epsilon, is there any corresponding equation in magnetostatics, relating magnetic ...
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21 views

In electrostatics, what is the actual relation between flux density and flux

I know, in magnetostatics, unit of flux in webers. And unit of flux density B is webs per metre square. its clear. Now in electrostatics, unit of flux is volts metre. And unit of flux density D is ...
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2answers
185 views

Does Biot-Savart law apply in changing electric field or it needs a modification just like Ampere's law, to become as true as Maxwell's 4th equation?

Does Biot-Savart law apply in changing electric field or it needs a modification just like Ampere's law, to become as true as Maxwell's 4th equation? In the update to Ampere's circuital law, the ...
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0answers
76 views

Would a super conductive insulation completely prevent the propagation of a magnetic field from a wire where it is wrapped around?

I have limited understanding about super conductors and see them as expelling magnetic fields purely due to eddy currents produced without resistance opposite the magnetic field. I have read that ...
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2answers
589 views

Why do high voltage transmission line workers need a Faraday cage suit?

In this video the high voltage transmission line workers are wearing a Faraday cage suit. Why is this needed? Without the Faraday cage, the resistance of the human would be very high compared to the ...
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1answer
63 views

Would Michelson-Morkey experiment measure wind in non-vacuum?

If we derive the speed of light from the Maxwell equations we will find it's a function of the permittivity and permeability of the medium. Now let's play with the thought that we are living in a ...
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What was Feynman's “much better way of presenting the electrodynamics” — which did **not** appear in the Feynman lectures?

Does anyone know what Feynman was referring to in this interview which appears at the beginning of The Feynman Tips on Physics? Note that he is referring to something that did not appear in the ...
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68 views

What unit system puts a bunch of powers of ten in Maxwell's equations?

In what unit system can we get the Maxwell equation in the following form (section 1.2 from Lewin's book Advanced Theory of Waveguide) $$\nabla\times \vec E = -10^8\mu \frac{\partial \vec H} ...
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Is it possible to generalize the Maxwell equations to higher dimensions?

The usual Maxwell equations are for 3 spatial dimensions, right? Is it possible to generalize them to 2 spatial dimensions or 4 spatial dimensions?
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Maxwell in multiple dimensions: What happens to curl?

I read this answer a while ago, and while thinking about $\nabla$, I realized something. Since the cross product can be written as a determinant, in higher dimensions we require extra vector inputs. ...
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1answer
185 views

Maxwell's equations in integral form using differential geometry

So I've been trying to convert from Maxwell's equations in terms of differential forms to the integral versions of Maxwell's equations that we know from vector calculus. We have, in vector calculus ...
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4answers
483 views

Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?

The Maxwell's equation $\boldsymbol{\nabla}\cdot \textbf{E}(\textbf{r})=\frac{\rho(\textbf{r})}{\epsilon_0}$ is derived from the Gauss law in electrostatics (which is in turn derived from Coulomb's ...
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129 views

In terms of the Ampere-Maxwell law, why is $\vec {E}=0$ in a wire of a capacitor circuit?

I'm currently studying from "Introduction to Electromagnetics" by D.J. Griffiths. In the book the significance of the displacement current term is explained by looking a non-steady capacitor circuit ...
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28 views

Single slit diffraction treated as a differential equation

I want to find the values of electromagnetic fields that result from single slit diffraction. This should be possible by solving maxwell's equations for appropriate boundary conditions. But I'm not ...
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0answers
37 views

Two equal charges accelerating parallel to each other

Let's say constant acceleration for simplicity. Ignore possible logistic concerns, such as what is accelerating them or how they stay in path. Lets just assume they are in a conduit made of a solid ...
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0answers
39 views

Pefectly electrically conducting Neumann boundary conditions

I have a rather subtle question regarding necessary boundary conditions. To solve Maxwell's source-free equations as an initial boundary value problem in a volume $\Omega$ bounded by a perfectly ...
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1answer
191 views

Time-harmonic Maxwell's equations

My question is about the time-harmonic or frequency domain (differential) form of Maxwell's equations. If one solves these and obtain the complex vector field $E$, are the real and imaginary parts ...
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56 views

Electric field from time varying charge density

Inside a cylinder of infinite length in $z$ axis, there is charge density $ ρ = cos(βz -ωt)$. I want to find the electric field and as far as i can understand we will get a radial component of $E$. ...
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92 views

$E$-field from changing current in straight wire

A very long insulated wire oriented along the $z$ axis of a cylindrical coordinate system is carrying current that is defined by the following function: $$I(t) =Io + k⋅t$$ (current increases linearly ...
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57 views

Spectroscopy from a classical light wave or photon only?

In chemistry we mostly regard light/electromagnetic radiation as a beam of particles or photons. This is a very useful model to explain molecular excitations and ionisations from quantum interactions. ...
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1answer
53 views

Apparent discrepancy between Lagrange field equation and Maxwell equation [closed]

I am deriving Maxwell's equations from a Lagrange field equation and have come across something I can not figure out no matter how hard I try. The problem is in the signs. If we take the Lagrange ...
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1answer
4k views

What is the meaning of this “let there be light” joke?

Someone across the restaurant is wearing this shirt, and I certainly don't get it. Update Related: What does this quote about the four dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric tensor mean?
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2answers
166 views

Where do Maxwell's equations come from?

I recently started learning the basic forms (integrals) of the Maxwell's equations, and everything that is related to electromagnetism seems to be derived from these fundamental equations. Now my ...
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1answer
72 views

Books on Faraday, Maxwell

Can you recommend a/some good book(s) on Faraday for the lay person? In particular, in relation to his 'Experimental Researches in Electricity'. Also, any books explaining how Maxwell explained ...
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1answer
33 views

Bobbin with $I=I_{0}\sin(\Omega t)$

If I have an infinite bobbin with $I=I_{0}\sin(\Omega t), \mu$ and $n=N/L$ using Ampère and supposing that $d\vec{D}/dt=\vec{0}$ I have found that $$\vec{B}=n\mu I_{0}\sin(\Omega t)\vec{e_{z}}$$ But ...
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58 views

Would magnetic charge (i.e., magnetic monopoles) be Lorentz invariant if it existed?

Would magnetic charge (i.e., magnetic monopoles) be Lorentz invariant if it existed? It is clear that Maxwell's equations in themselves permit magnetic charges but what would their relativistic ...
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38 views

Boundary conditions for vector wave equations

Assume the time-harmonic case of Maxwell's equations, one can obtain the following vector wave equations: $$ ...
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0answers
92 views

Calculating current on power line from induced voltage on nearby loop

The question I'm having trouble with is: A small circular loop of 5mm radius is placed 1 meter away from a 60Hz power line. The voltage induced on this loop is measured at 0.6 microvolts. What is the ...
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2answers
482 views

Are photon energies conserved in general relativity?

As I understand it, both Maxwell's wave equation and the null geodesics of general relativity are scale invariant. Thus an electromagnetic wave can be shifted along a null geodesic without changing ...
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2answers
766 views

Solution of simple problems using only Maxwell equations in differential form

Solve simple electrostatic or magnetostatic problems using only Maxwell equations. For example: In every book there is an excercise to find a magnetic field outside a thin wire of radius $a$ with ...