The four fundamental fundamental equations of electromagnetism.

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Exactly how is the constant measured velocity of light deduced from Maxwell's equation?

For electromagnetic radiation the velocity of propagation is $c = 1/\sqrt{\mu_0 \epsilon_0}$. Since both $\mu_0$ and $\epsilon_0$ do not vary in any inertial frame, then $c$ must be constant in any ...
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When studying electrodynamics do we assume Maxwell's Equations or derive them?

This question is because something made me confused. I always thought that the idea behind electrodynamics was to postulate some things, like Coulomb's law in electrostatics and so on, and then ...
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Twistor Function for Coulomb Field

In an article by Penrose in Hughston and Ward "Advances in Twistor Theory", it is claimed that the twistor function $$ f(Z^\alpha) = \log{\frac{Z^1Z^2 - Z^0Z^3}{Z^2Z^3}}$$ produces an anti-self-dual ...
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Faraday's Law and Galilean Invariance

In Jackson's text he says that Faraday law is actually: $$ \oint_{\partial \Sigma} \mathbf{E} \cdot \mathrm{d}\boldsymbol{\ell} = -k\iint_{\Sigma} \frac{\partial \mathbf B}{\partial t} \cdot ...
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What was the improvement that Maxwell did to the electromagnetic field equations and why?

What was the improvement that Maxwell did to the electromagnetic field equations and why? I understand that he combined the main equations so that you could get a wave equation for the vectors of ...
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580 views

Integral vs differential forms of Maxwell's equations

As stated in this post, the integral and differential Maxwell equations should be identical. However, in a text I was reading it states that The integral forms of Maxwell’s equations describe the ...
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Did Maxwell invent the math to describe the ideas of electromagnetism?

Did he invent surface and line integrals, or did they already exist when he formulated his equations. If they did, already exist, how did they come about in pure math?
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790 views

Galilean invariance of a subset of Maxwell equations

I read in Feynman's proof of Maxwell equations the statement that the subset of Maxwell equations comming from the Bianchi identity: $$ \nabla \cdot {\bf B} = 0, \quad \nabla \times {\bf E} + ...
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How are the Lorentz force, Maxwell's third law and Faraday's law of induction clasically related?

Faraday's law of induction can be used in any situation where the magnetic flux is changing through a closed conducting loop. While giving the correct answer, it seems to me that for the following ...
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Physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and origin of EM waves

Is it possible to describe the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and show how they lead to electromagnetic wave, with little involvement of mathematics ?
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Maxwell equations invariant under Lorentz transformation but not Galilean transformations

Why Maxwell equations are not invariant under Galilean transformations, but invariant under Lorentz transformations? What is the deep physical meaning behind it?
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Problem with Maxwell's theory

What exactly is the problem with classical Maxwell theory and the blowing up of energy at $r=0$? Does it have any other problems on the classical level?
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What electric field vector should I use for modeling unpolarized light?

Regardless of computational cost, light is a kind of electromagnetic wave, so it can be simulated with Maxwell's equations. If we want to simulate light with Maxwell's equations, we need to express ...
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Derivatives of delta function and equation of continuity for a single charge…

For a single charge $e$ with position vector $\textbf R$, the charge density $\rho$ and and current density $\textbf{j}$ are fiven by: \begin{equation} \rho(\textbf{r},t)= ...
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Derivation of the speed of light using the integral forms of Maxwell's Equations

Having just finished physics 2, I've been (slightly) exposed to showing that light is a wave with speed $1/\sqrt{\mu _0 \epsilon _0 }$ using the differential forms of Maxwell's equations, though this ...
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156 views

Do Maxwell equeations change somehow after Higg's boson finding?

When I was in some physics -lesson, probably something to do with Quantum Physics -- the teacher said that certain Maxwell equations would change if the Higg's boson is found. It is also possible that ...
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667 views

“And God said…and there was light.” What does these equations mean? [duplicate]

Today while I was on the Internet I came across an interesting picture, that caught my eye. It's : I don't have to explain why this picture seems interesting to someone who knows the meaning and ...
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252 views

Classical Viewpoint on Electromagnetism

Note: This question may be difficult or impossible to answer within the rules of these forums due to its philosophical nature. I will delete the question if I am violating the rules. Onto the ...
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Do the fields exist without electric charges? [closed]

I read in an old book on electrodynamics by Pauli that theoretically there does not exist any need of charges to be there. Fields can even exist without the charges but still independent fields ...
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270 views

Plane wave complex notation

As far as I know, the function: $$ \vec{E}(\vec{r},t)=\vec{E_0}\cdot e^{i(\vec{k}\cdot \vec{r}-\omega t)} \hspace{2cm}(1) $$ is a mathematical solution of the wave equation: $$ \nabla^2 ...
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What is the physical significance of the Dipole Transformation of Maxwell's Equations?

The Question Given Maxwell's equations of the form \begin{align} \bar{\nabla}\times \bar{B} = \dfrac{4\pi}{c} \bar{J} + \partial_0 \bar{E} \\ \bar{\nabla}\times \bar{E} = -\partial_0 \bar{B} \\ ...
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379 views

Electromagnetic black hole?

So I was thinking about something for the past while Consider a large spherical foam-ball with homogeneous density. Where a foam ball is defined as an object that can absorb matter with 0 friction ...
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How would you define electrostatics and magnetostatics starting from Maxwell's equations?

I'm reading Griffith's text, and he starts by defining Electrostatics as requiring the source charges don't move. I've seen a few slightly different definitions of electrostatics and magnetostatics. ...
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Information content of the electrostatic Maxwell equations vs Coulomb's Law vs Poisson's Equation

In electrostatics, we have Maxwell's equations: $\nabla \cdot E = \rho$ $\nabla \times E = 0$ These four equations (the second line standing for three equations) can also be written in terms of the ...
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How do you find the magnetic field corresponding to an electric field?

If we are given the electric field $\vec E$ how can I find the corresponding magnetic field? I think I can use Maxwell's equations? In particular, $\nabla\times \vec E= -{\partial \vec B\over \partial ...
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Divergence of non conservative electric field

I'm looking for the proof that the 1st Maxwell equation is valid also on non conservative electric field. When we are talking about a electrostatic field, the equation is ok. We can apply the Gauss ...
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92 views

What does it physically mean to take the curl of the curl of a field (wave equation derivation)?

What does it physically mean to take the curl of the curl of a field in the derivation of the electromagnetic wave equation from Maxwell's equations, as presented here, on Wikipedia? Why was it a ...
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How did special relativity change physicists views on the two prominent inverse square laws (ie Newton grav and Coulomb's law)?

On page 107 in Hartle's Gravity -- An introduction to Einstein's General Relativity, he says the following With the success of special relativity it became apparent that the Newtonian theory of ...
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How can Maxwell theory be viewed in terms of two-layer structure?

I'm trying to learn more about Maxwell equations and stumbled upon an essay by professor Freeman J. Dyson from Princeton. He explained Maxwell theory in a very interesting way. The modem view of ...
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148 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
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155 views

Assumptions when calculating $\vec{B}$ using Ampère's (circuital) law

When considering the same setup as in this question, i.e. a straight, infinitely long wire carrying the current $I$, Ampère's circuital law $$\oint_C \vec{B} \cdot \mathrm{d}\vec{r} = \mu_0 ...
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98 views

$D$ and $H$ in macroscopic Maxwell's equation: auxiliary or constitutive?

I'm not a physicist. I want to understand the macroscopic Maxwell's equations. But after reading Wikipedia and other Googled stuffs, I got very confused. In particular, $D$ and $H$ have two different ...
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Understanding the Ampere's Law

We want to study the magnetic field at point $P$. So, from the figure we take that: $\oint_{L_1} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_1$ $\oint_{L_2} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_2$ $\oint_{L_3} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_2$ The ...
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Why is there no (time derivative of charge density) in the $B$ field in Jefimenko's equations?

I was going through Griffiths chapter on potentials and fields just to brush up on a few old things. He gets to Jefimenko's equations by this general path: Maxwell's equations Introduce scalar and ...
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Magnetostatics of Current-Carrying wire

A question has been nagging at me about Faraday's Law as related to a wire with a constant current: If you have a circular loop of wire with some small resistivity, connected to a battery so that it ...
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55 views

Do the relations between E/B and D/H contain higher order multipole terms?

Jackson writes in section 1.4 (third edition) that \begin{align*} D_\alpha &= \epsilon_0 E_\alpha + \left(P_\alpha - \sum_\beta \frac{\partial Q'_{\alpha\beta}}{\partial x_\beta} + \ldots \right) ...
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Maxwell's equation in curved spacetime - how come? And experimental evidence?

I'm trying to understand the generalization of Maxwell's equations to curved spacetime. In FLAT (Minkowski) SPACETIME: If we define the "four-potential" as $$\ ...
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221 views

Electromagnetic inertia due to advanced radiation?

The scalar potential $\phi$ and vector potential $A$ at a distance $r$ from a charge $q$ are given approximately by $$\phi = \frac{q}{r}$$ $$\mathbf{A} = \frac{q\mathbf v}{r}$$ where the constants ...
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Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?

The Maxwell's equation $\boldsymbol{\nabla}\cdot \textbf{E}(\textbf{r})=\frac{\rho(\textbf{r})}{\epsilon_0}$ is derived from the Gauss law in electrostatics (which is in turn derived from Coulomb's ...
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Where does the $\partial \vec{E}/\partial t$ term from Maxwell's equation go in Ampere's Law?

One of Maxwell's Equations (ME) is: $$\nabla\times\vec B = \mu_0\vec J+\epsilon_0\mu_0 \frac{\partial \vec E}{\partial t}.$$ While Ampere's Law (AL) is: $$\nabla\times\vec B = \mu_0\vec J.$$ ...
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Why is $\mu_0$ missing in EM formulas in Peskin and Schroeder?

In this post, $\hbar=c=1$ units are used throughout. It is well known that the action of classical electromagnetism is given by $$\mathcal S_{\text{Maxwell}} = \int ...
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Question about units of mass, $M = (L^{3})(T^{-2})$?

In section 5 of the "Preliminary: On the measurement of quantities" chapter (page 3) in "A treatise on electricity and magnetism" Maxwell uses, total length, $s=mt^{2}/{2r^{2}}$to show that ...
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Does $E$ cause $B$ or does $B$ cause $E$ in Maxwell's equations?

From the Maxwell's equations we get $$\frac{\partial E}{\partial x} = -\frac{\partial B}{\partial t}$$ and $$\frac{\partial B}{\partial x} = -\mu_0\epsilon_0\frac{\partial E}{\partial t}$$ ...
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471 views

Magnetic B Field of Point Charge Not at Constant Velocity

I'm working on an N-body simulator for charged particles. I know that moving charged particles generate a magnetic field, and another moving charged particle could be effected by this magnetic field. ...
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Why is the displacement current term needed in the Maxwell's equations?

Why did Maxwell believe that a displacement current term needed to be added to Ampere's circuital law? I have found loads of answers online about the plates acting as capacitors but i don't ...
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Why does $E=\nabla\phi$ follow from $\nabla\times E=0$?

I understand that using one of Maxwell's equations, $$\vec{\nabla} \times \vec{E}(\vec{x})=0,$$ it can be said that $$\vec{E}(\vec{x})=-\vec \nabla \phi(\vec{x}).$$ However, I can't find or ...
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Solution of simple problems using only Maxwell equations in differential form

Solve simple electrostatic or magnetostatic problems using only Maxwell equations. For example: In every book there is an excercise to find a magnetic field outside a thin wire of radius $a$ with ...
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A James Clerk Maxwell Disproof

One of my favorite physicists to learn about was James Clerk Maxwell, for the fact that he unified the study of E&M in physics and he would often disprove theories that did not work as a ...
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Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
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Curl of an electromagnetic wave?

I can't understand the concept of the curl of an electromagnetic wave. $$ \nabla \times E = -\frac{\partial \textbf{B}}{\partial t} $$ All of the examples I find show a current through a conductor, ...