The four fundamental fundamental equations of electromagnetism.

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Faraday's Law and Galilean Invariance

In Jackson's text he says that Faraday law is actually: $$ \oint_{\partial \Sigma} \mathbf{E} \cdot \mathrm{d}\boldsymbol{\ell} = -k\iint_{\Sigma} \frac{\partial \mathbf B}{\partial t} \cdot ...
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107 views

Do the fields exist without electric charges? [closed]

I read in an old book on electrodynamics by Pauli that theoretically there does not exist any need of charges to be there. Fields can even exist without the charges but still independent fields ...
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146 views

Classical Viewpoint on Electromagnetism

Note: This question may be difficult or impossible to answer within the rules of these forums due to its philosophical nature. I will delete the question if I am violating the rules. Onto the ...
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1answer
153 views

Plane wave complex notation

As far as I know, the function: $$ \vec{E}(\vec{r},t)=\vec{E_0}\cdot e^{i(\vec{k}\cdot \vec{r}-\omega t)} \hspace{2cm}(1) $$ is a mathematical solution of the wave equation: $$ \nabla^2 ...
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What is the physical significance of the Dipole Transformation of Maxwell's Equations?

The Question Given Maxwell's equations of the form \begin{align} \bar{\nabla}\times \bar{B} = \dfrac{4\pi}{c} \bar{J} + \partial_0 \bar{E} \\ \bar{\nabla}\times \bar{E} = -\partial_0 \bar{B} \\ ...
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232 views

Electromagnetic black hole?

So I was thinking about something for the past while Consider a large spherical foam-ball with homogeneous density. Where a foam ball is defined as an object that can absorb matter with 0 friction ...
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3answers
86 views

How would you define electrostatics and magnetostatics starting from Maxwell's equations?

I'm reading Griffith's text, and he starts by defining Electrostatics as requiring the source charges don't move. I've seen a few slightly different definitions of electrostatics and magnetostatics. ...
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1answer
77 views

$D$ and $H$ in macroscopic Maxwell's equation: auxiliary or constitutive?

I'm not a physicist. I want to understand the macroscopic Maxwell's equations. But after reading Wikipedia and other Googled stuffs, I got very confused. In particular, $D$ and $H$ have two different ...
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1answer
271 views

Information content of the electrostatic Maxwell equations vs Coulomb's Law vs Poisson's Equation

In electrostatics, we have Maxwell's equations: $\nabla \cdot E = \rho$ $\nabla \times E = 0$ These four equations (the second line standing for three equations) can also be written in terms of the ...
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1answer
92 views

How can Maxwell theory be viewed in terms of two-layer structure?

I'm trying to learn more about Maxwell equations and stumbled upon an essay by professor Freeman J. Dyson from Princeton. He explained Maxwell theory in a very interesting way. The modem view of ...
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138 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
3
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1answer
120 views

Assumptions when calculating $\vec{B}$ using Ampère's (circuital) law

When considering the same setup as in this question, i.e. a straight, infinitely long wire carrying the current $I$, Ampère's circuital law $$\oint_C \vec{B} \cdot \mathrm{d}\vec{r} = \mu_0 ...
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344 views

Understanding the Ampere's Law

We want to study the magnetic field at point $P$. So, from the figure we take that: $\oint_{L_1} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_1$ $\oint_{L_2} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_2$ $\oint_{L_3} B\cdot dl=\mu_0 I_2$ The ...
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2answers
217 views

Magnetostatics of Current-Carrying wire

A question has been nagging at me about Faraday's Law as related to a wire with a constant current: If you have a circular loop of wire with some small resistivity, connected to a battery so that it ...
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1answer
3k views

Physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and origin of EM waves

Is it possible to describe the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and show how they lead to electromagnetic wave, with little involvement of mathematics ?
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205 views

Confusion between magnetic field and magnetic flux

I've been learning about electromagnetism and Maxwell's equations (in integral form), and I'm slightly confused. The Ampere-Maxwell law (as I know it): $$ ...
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2answers
79 views

Where does the $\partial \vec{E}/\partial t$ term from Maxwell's equation go in Ampere's Law?

One of Maxwell's Equations (ME) is: $$\nabla\times\vec B = \mu_0\vec J+\epsilon_0\mu_0 \frac{\partial \vec E}{\partial t}.$$ While Ampere's Law (AL) is: $$\nabla\times\vec B = \mu_0\vec J.$$ ...
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4answers
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Displacement Current - How to think of it?

What is a good way to think of the displacement current? Maxwell imagined it as being movements in the aether, small changed of electric field producing magnetic field. I don't even understand that ...
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3answers
170 views

Question about units of mass, $M = (L^{3})(T^{-2})$?

In section 5 of the "Preliminary: On the measurement of quantities" chapter (page 3) in "A treatise on electricity and magnetism" Maxwell uses, total length, $s=mt^{2}/{2r^{2}}$to show that ...
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2answers
128 views

Does $E$ cause $B$ or does $B$ cause $E$ in Maxwell's equations?

From the Maxwell's equations we get $$\frac{\partial E}{\partial x} = -\frac{\partial B}{\partial t}$$ and $$\frac{\partial B}{\partial x} = -\mu_0\epsilon_0\frac{\partial E}{\partial t}$$ ...
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4answers
215 views

Why does $E=\nabla\phi$ follow from $\nabla\times E=0$?

I understand that using one of Maxwell's equations, $$\vec{\nabla} \times \vec{E}(\vec{x})=0,$$ it can be said that $$\vec{E}(\vec{x})=-\vec \nabla \phi(\vec{x}).$$ However, I can't find or ...
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A James Clerk Maxwell Disproof

One of my favorite physicists to learn about was James Clerk Maxwell, for the fact that he unified the study of E&M in physics and he would often disprove theories that did not work as a ...
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4answers
267 views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
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3answers
488 views

Curl of an electromagnetic wave?

I can't understand the concept of the curl of an electromagnetic wave. $$ \nabla \times E = -\frac{\partial \textbf{B}}{\partial t} $$ All of the examples I find show a current through a conductor, ...
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1answer
499 views

Retrieving Maxwell's equations from the minimum action principle

I'm currently working at the start of Alexei Tsvelik's book Quantum Field Theory in Condensed Matter Physics. I'm kinda stumped on a few essential steps. Starting with the action: $$S = \int dt \int ...
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383 views

Invariance of Maxwell's Equations under inverting variables - Reference and use

Some months ago, an ArXiv paper mentioned in passing that Maxwell's Equations were invariant under reciprocating the variables, or at least this results in a dual set of Maxwell Equations. (Actually I ...
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1answer
149 views

parity invariance of Einstein, Maxwell and Dirac Lagrangians

How can we show that Einstein, Maxwell and Dirac Lagrangians are parity invariant?
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606 views

How is this classical “paradox” resolved in electromagnetism?

A magnet and a coil move relative to each other. In the frame of reference of the magnet, there is a magnetic field and consequently a force acting on the charges in the coil according to the Lorentz ...
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2answers
154 views

Electromagnetism duality theorem

Concerning Electromagnetism, textbooks often refer to the Duality Theorem. Sometimes it is presented like this: «Consider the Maxwell's Equations (with phasors) and a known field $\mathbf{E}_1$, ...
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1answer
435 views

Electrodynamics and the Lagrangian density

Could anyone tell me what equations can I obtain from the Lagrangian density $${\cal L}(\phi,\,\,\phi_{,i},\,\,A_i, \dot A_i,\,\,A_{i,j})~=~\frac{1}{2}|\dot A+\nabla\phi|^2-\frac{1}{2}|\nabla \times ...
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2answers
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How do you find the magnetic field corresponding to an electric field?

If we are given the electric field $\vec E$ how can I find the corresponding magnetic field? I think I can use Maxwell's equations? In particular, $\nabla\times \vec E= -{\partial \vec B\over \partial ...
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2answers
704 views

Divergence of non conservative electric field

I'm looking for the proof that the 1st Maxwell equation is valid also on non conservative electric field. When we are talking about a electrostatic field, the equation is ok. We can apply the Gauss ...
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2answers
208 views

Applying $\nabla\times\mathbf{B} = \mu_0\mathbf{J}$ in the presence of magnetic shielding

2012-06-13 - Revised question in experimental format (This is a thought experiment for which RF experts may have an immediate answer.) I'll assume (I could be wrong) the possibility of creating a ...
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2answers
256 views

Understanding Dynamic light scattering

I'd like to understand the physics of dynamic light scattering experiment. In particular I want to understand the basic relation between relaxation time $\tau_q$ and the diffusion coefficient $D$: ...
2
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2answers
471 views

A Paradox in Special Relativity

Two inertial frames K and k’ are considered. They are in relative uniform motion along the x-x’ direction with relative speed =v. In the frame K’ we have a cuboidal piece of dielectric [at rest wrt ...
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Magnetic field in materials with non-constant magnetic susceptibility

I'm quite lost what $B$ and $H$ is. It seams to me that most of the texts I read do quite poor job in explaining them properly. They are explained only in cases when magnetic susceptibility is ...
2
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1answer
230 views

Why is there no (time derivative of charge density) in the $B$ field in Jefimenko's equations?

I was going through Griffiths chapter on potentials and fields just to brush up on a few old things. He gets to Jefimenko's equations by this general path: Maxwell's equations Introduce scalar and ...
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2answers
457 views

Is there any relation between weak and strong fields, similar to electric and magnetic fields?

Is it possible to unify the strong, weak, electric and magnetic field just by Maxwellian type equations? (Maxwell by adding a small change - unified electric and magnetic field, then Einstein's ...
2
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1answer
364 views

why is advanced radiation absent?

the Lienard-Wiechert green functions have future and past null cones of radiation. Maxwell equations allow for a continuous range of mixtures between the retarded and advanced components, but we have ...
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2answers
492 views

Electron model under Maxwell's theory

I was not able to recall my memories, so: What is the formula that states the frequency of electrons revolving around nucleus is equal to the frequency of light (or photon) emitted (or radiated)? (I ...
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0answers
86 views

How to properly construct the electromagnetic tensor in curved space-time? (Part II)

In this question, I am testing what was previously discussed. I can't seem to get my results to match D'Inverno's electromagnetic tensor for a charged point (page 239 of his book - Introducing ...
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0answers
91 views

One question about derivation of Maxwell equations

I saw the following way of derivation of Maxwell equations: author starts from Lorentz transformations for the 3-vector of force, then he applies them for the Coulomb law, after that gets the Lorentz ...
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0answers
202 views

Electromagnetism - Proof of the Uniqueness theorem for an external problem

In the electromagnetic Uniqueness theorem, we consider a volume $V$ enclosed by a surface $S$. It is initially assumed that two different fields are valid solutions for the Maxwell's equations with ...
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0answers
271 views

Maxwell equations and symmetry

Do the full inhomogeneous Maxwell equations obey parity (P) and time reversal (T) symmetry separately or only the full CPT symmetry? I believe the homogeneous Maxwell equations obey parity and time ...
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0answers
369 views

Electromagnetic duality

A key aspect of modern physics is the mapping of theories or different descriptions of a theory into a one-to-one correspondence. As I am trying to further understand the electromagnetic field tensor, ...
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0answers
100 views

Two spinor tensors and Maxwell's equations

Let's have two symmetric (by the indices) spinor tensors $F_{ab}, F_{\dot {a}\dot {b}}$ and conditions $$ F_{ab}, \partial^{\dot {a} a}F_{ab} = 0, \quad F_{\dot {a}\dot {b}}, \partial^{\dot ...
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0answers
160 views

Electromagnetic inertia due to advanced radiation?

The scalar potential $\phi$ and vector potential $A$ at a distance $r$ from a charge $q$ are given approximately by $$\phi = \frac{q}{r}$$ $$\mathbf{A} = \frac{q\mathbf v}{r}$$ where the constants ...
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3answers
256 views

How to understand holography and hologram

I've spent some time reading wiki etc. What I get now is that apart from the normal light amplitude information, holograms also record the phase information of light. But this is so difficult for me ...
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2answers
718 views

What constitutes displacement current? [duplicate]

In the chapter electromagnetic waves I was introduced with the concept of displacement current inside a capacitor. Since the region inside the capacitor is a dielectric there is no charge carriers in ...
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2answers
702 views

Special Relativity: Transforming Maxwell's equations

I'm working through Einstein's original 1905 paper*, and I'm having trouble with the section on the transformation of Maxwell's equations from rest to moving frame. The paper proceeds as follows: ...