4
votes
1answer
476 views

What is the meaning of this “let there be light” joke?

A middle school teacher across the restaurant is wearing this shirt, and I certainly don't get it.
2
votes
3answers
371 views

Curl of an electromagnetic wave?

I can't understand the concept of the curl of an electromagnetic wave. $$ \nabla \times E = -\frac{\partial \textbf{B}}{\partial t} $$ All of the examples I find show a current through a conductor, ...
0
votes
0answers
69 views

Compatibility between solutions of explicit Maxwell equations vs. wave equation?

When trying to solve for the allowed propagation frequencies in a cylindrical waveguide, I approached the problem by solving the wave equation for all three components of $\bar{E}$, and subsequently ...
5
votes
2answers
167 views

Is my simulation result for unpolarized light correct?

This is a follow-up of this question. After that, I picked up some knowledge of FDTD (an algorithm for solving Maxwell's equations) and simulated following scene: Pic 1 As the picture shows, a ...
1
vote
2answers
101 views

How to show with Maxwells Equations that nonaccelerating charges dont radiate? [closed]

How to show with Maxwells Equations that nonaccelerating charges don't radiate?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and origin of EM waves

Is it possible to describe the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations and show how they lead to electromagnetic wave, with little involvement of mathematics ?
3
votes
3answers
217 views

What electric field vector should I use for modeling unpolarized light?

Regardless of computational cost, light is a kind of electromagnetic wave, so it can be simulated with Maxwell's equations. If we want to simulate light with Maxwell's equations, we need to express ...
5
votes
0answers
133 views

Reaction-at-a-distance: Do charged plates immediately repel each other?

Imagine that we have a pair of parallel plates, $A$ and $B$, separated by some distance as in Fig. $1$ above. At time $t_1$ we simultaneously charge both the plates. This could be done by ...
2
votes
2answers
127 views

Does $E$ cause $B$ or does $B$ cause $E$ in Maxwell's equations?

From the Maxwell's equations we get $$\frac{\partial E}{\partial x} = -\frac{\partial B}{\partial t}$$ and $$\frac{\partial B}{\partial x} = -\mu_0\epsilon_0\frac{\partial E}{\partial t}$$ ...
5
votes
2answers
688 views

Why is glass much more transparent than water?

There is a related question (Why glass is transparent?) but I am coming at it only from Maxwell's equations. One can determine the skin depth $δ$ for poor conductors like (pure) water and glass using ...
0
votes
2answers
315 views

An Electromagnetic Paradox?

The above diagram represents an isolated system with two masses $M$, at position $X$, and $m$, at position $x$, connected together by an extended spring. Each mass is connected by rigid rods to ...
1
vote
1answer
264 views

Uncertainty-principle and the Maxwell formalism of electromagnetic waves

An electromagnetic wave (like a propagating photon) is known to carry it's electric and magnetic field-vectors perpendicular and each depending on the differential change of the other thus "creating" ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Idea of precursors of the electro-magnetic waves

The idea of the material Maxwell equation is almost clear. But I'm curious about the idea that except for material equation the pure Maxwell equation should work, but in harder sense: more currents ...
2
votes
1answer
344 views

why is advanced radiation absent?

the Lienard-Wiechert green functions have future and past null cones of radiation. Maxwell equations allow for a continuous range of mixtures between the retarded and advanced components, but we have ...
18
votes
3answers
882 views

Can light exists in $2+1$ or $1+1$ spacetime dimensions?

Spacetime of special relativity is frequently illustrated with its spatial part reduced to one or two spatial dimension (with light sector or cone, respectively). Taken literally, is it possible for ...
2
votes
2answers
251 views

Understanding Dynamic light scattering

I'd like to understand the physics of dynamic light scattering experiment. In particular I want to understand the basic relation between relaxation time $\tau_q$ and the diffusion coefficient $D$: ...
4
votes
3answers
414 views

Exactly how is the constant measured velocity of light deduced from Maxwell's equation?

For electromagnetic radiation the velocity of propagation is $c = 1/\sqrt{\mu_0 \epsilon_0}$. Since both $\mu_0$ and $\epsilon_0$ do not vary in any inertial frame, then $c$ must be constant in any ...