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13
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3answers
125 views

Status of local gauge invariance in axiomatic quantum field theory

In his recent review... Sergio Doplicher, The principle of locality: Effectiveness, fate, and challenges, J. Math. Phys. 51, 015218 (2010), doi ...Sergio Doplicher mentions an important open ...
15
votes
4answers
572 views

What is a good introduction to integrable models in physics?

I would be interested in a good mathematician-friendly introduction to integrable models in physics, either a book or expository article. Related MathOverflow question: what-is-an-integrable-system.
11
votes
0answers
378 views

Hypersingular Boundary Operator in Physics

This has been a question I've been asking myself for quite some time now. Is there a physical Interpretation of the Hypersingular Boundary Operator? First, let me give some motivation why I think ...
0
votes
1answer
139 views

Use of escort distribution in nonextensive stat. mech

In some of the articles which I read recently, I happen to see the following statement. In Nonextensive statistical physics, it is inappropriate to use the original distribution $P=(p_i)$ ...
18
votes
5answers
2k views

What do theoretical physicists need from computer scientists?

I recently co-authored a paper (not online yet unfortunately) with some chemists that essentially provided answers to the question, "What do chemists need from computer scientists?" This included the ...
4
votes
1answer
296 views

Propagators from integral representations of Green`s functions

I'm working on an article about propagators from int. representations of Green`s functions for several N-dimensional potential(all this is done in an N-dimensional Euclidian space). Potentials like ...
20
votes
2answers
96 views

Bell polytopes with nontrivial symmetries

Take $N$ parties, each of which receives an input $s_i \in {1, \dots, m_i}$ and produces an output $r_i \in {1, \dots, v_i}$, possibly in a nondeterministic manner. We are interested in joint ...
15
votes
4answers
73 views

Why can't noncontextual ontological theories have stronger correlations than commutative theories?

EDIT: I found both answers to my question to be unsatisfactory. But I think this is because the question itself is unsatisfactory, so I reworded it in order to allow a good answer. One take on ...
22
votes
1answer
358 views

Mermin-Wagner theorem in the presence of hard-core interactions

It seems quite common in the theoretical physics literature to see applications of the "Mermin-Wagner theorem" (see wikipedia or scholarpedia for some limited background) to systems with hard-core ...
16
votes
6answers
661 views

Applications of delay differential equations

Being interested in the mathematical theory, I was wondering if there are up-to-date, nontrivial models/theories where delay differential equations play a role (PDE-s, or more general functional ...
6
votes
1answer
207 views

Nonextensive statistical mechanics

I know that the Tsallis($S_q$) entropy is called nonextensive information measure in the sense that if $P$ and $Q$ are two probability distributions then $S_q(P\times ...
0
votes
0answers
66 views

How to calculate 2D soft-body Physics [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 2d soft body physics mathematics The definition of rigid body in Box2d is A chunk of matter that is so strong that the distance between any two bits of matter on ...
34
votes
2answers
463 views

Physical interpretation of different selfadjoint extensions

Given a symmetric (densely defined) operator in a Hilbert space, there might be quite a lot of selfadjoint extensions to it. This might be the case for a Schrödinger operator with a "bad" potential. ...
12
votes
1answer
151 views

Are possible gauge fields in a Lagrangian theory always determined by the structure of the charged degrees of freedom?

An elementary example to explain what I mean. Consider introducing a classical point particle with a Lagrangian $L(\mathbf{q} ,\dot{\mathbf{q}}, t)$. The most general gauge transformation is $L ...
18
votes
2answers
87 views

Significance of the hyperfinite $III_1$ factor for axiomatic quantum field theory

Using a form of the Haag-Kastler axioms for quantum field theory (see AQFT on the nLab for more details), it is possible in quite general contexts to prove that all local algebras are isomorphic to ...
17
votes
2answers
158 views

Can symmetry generators be used for quantization?

Take the Poincaré group for example. The conservation of rest-mass $m_0$ is generated by the invariance with respect to $p^2 = -\partial_\mu\partial^\mu$. Now if one simply claims The state where ...
73
votes
6answers
2k views

What are the justifying foundations of statistical mechanics without appealing to the ergodic hypothesis?

This question was listed as one of the questions in the proposal (see here), and I didn't know the answer. I don't know the ethics on blatantly stealing such a question, so if it should be deleted or ...
9
votes
2answers
513 views

Transforming a sum into an integral

I posted this in the mathematical forums. Maybe you will help me. I found an hard article http://prola.aps.org/abstract/PR/v105/i3/p776_1 of yang huang and luttinger. The authors begins with the sum: ...
3
votes
4answers
582 views

Generalized functions in physics

Prior to the Dirac delta function, what other distributions functions where physicists using? I find it hard to motivate the theory of generalized functions with just the delta function alone.
4
votes
0answers
127 views

K3 gravitational instanton

Could you please recommend a sufficiently elementary introduction to K3 gravitational instanton in general relativity and the problem of finding its explicit form? Under 'sufficiently elementary' I ...
2
votes
1answer
404 views

Orientability of spacetime

In many theoretical setups it is implicitly assumed that the underlying manifold (i.e. spacetime) is orientable. Then our analysis depends on this implicit assumption. For example, Stokes' theorem ...
5
votes
2answers
518 views

Positive Mass Theorem and Geodesic Deviation

This is a thought I had a while ago, and I was wondering if it was satisfactory as a physicist's proof of the positive mass theorem. The positive mass theorem was proven by Schoen and Yau using ...
5
votes
2answers
899 views

Normalizing the free particle wave function

One way to normalize the free particle wave function "is to replace the the boundary condition $\psi(\pm{\frac{a}{2}}) = 0$ [for the infinite well] by periodic boundary conditions expressed in ...
3
votes
1answer
782 views

Are There Strings that aren't Chew-ish?

String theory is made from Chew-ish strings, strings which follow Geoffrey Chew's S-matrix principle. These strings have the property that all their scattering is via string exchange, so that the ...
4
votes
2answers
280 views

Combinatorial sum in a problem with a Fermi gas

I'm solving a problem involving a Fermi gas. There is a specific sum I cannot figure my way around. A set of equidistant levels, indexed by $m=0,1,2 \ldots$, is populated by spinless fermions with ...
2
votes
2answers
727 views

Does the phase space (configuration and momentum space) of particles have a Euclidean norm? Does it have a useful meaning of “distance”?

Often in engineering physics, different vector spaces are used to visualize the trajectories (evolution) of systems. An example being the 6n dimensional phase space of n particles. It is not very ...
3
votes
2answers
709 views

Complete vs General Integral of first order PDE

The following is an excerpt from Landau's Course on Theoretical Physics Vol.1 Mechanics: ... we should recall the fact that every first-order partial differential equation has a solution depending ...
23
votes
4answers
1k views

In quantum mechanics, given certain energy spectrum can one generate the corresponding potential?

A typical problem in quantum mechanics is to calculate the spectrum that corresponds to a given potential. Is there a one to one correspondence between the potential and its spectrum? If the ...
9
votes
4answers
468 views

Why must the field equations be differential?

In Landau–Lifshitz's Course of Theoretical Physics, Vol. 2 (‘Classical Fields Theory’), Ch. IV, § 27, there is an explanation why the field equations should be linear differential equations. It goes ...
2
votes
1answer
204 views

Fourier analysis in crystallography

What is the best reference for an introduction to the use of Fourier analysis in crystallography?
3
votes
1answer
468 views

Numerical computation of the Rayleigh-Lamb curves

The Rayleigh-Lamb equations: $$\frac{\tan (pd)}{\tan (qd)}=-\left[\frac{4k^2pq}{\left(k^2-q^2\right)^2}\right]^{\pm 1}$$ (two equations, one with the +1 exponent and the other with the -1 exponent) ...
5
votes
2answers
243 views

differential equation with periodic conditions

given the differential operator Eigenvalue problem $ -D^{2}y(x)=E_{n}y(x) $ with boundary periodic conditions $ y(x)=y(x+1)$ my question is if there is a similar probelm for the Dilation operator $ ...
13
votes
1answer
526 views

How come random matrices can predict energy spectra of heavy atoms?

Some of the applications of random matrices is to find the spectra of heavy atoms in nuclear physics which are usually difficult to find otherwise. How can starting from randomness of some kind, ...
11
votes
5answers
781 views

Examples where an ill-behaved function leads to surprising results?

In mathematical derivations of physical identities, it is often more or less implicitly assumed that functions are well behaved. One example are the Maxwell identities in thermodynamics which assume ...
3
votes
2answers
371 views

Pade Approximant

I have some questions about Pade approximants. Given a divergent power series $ \sum_{n >0} a(n)x^{n} $ can we use a Pade Approximant to it $ R(x)$ so we can obtain a SUM of the series for every ...
9
votes
1answer
507 views

Discrete gauge theories

I'm trying to understand a particular case of gauge theories, namely discrete spaces on which a group G can act transitively, with a gauge group H which is discrete as well. From what I've already ...
9
votes
1answer
223 views

Can Fermionic symmetries be fully integrated into geometric deformation complexes or symplectic reduction?

How should a geometer think about quotienting out by a Fermionic symmetry? Is this a formal concept? A strictly linear concept? A sheaf theoretic concept? How does symplectic reduction work with odd ...
7
votes
3answers
721 views

What is a basis for the Hilbert space of a 1-D scattering state?

Suppose I have a massive particle in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Its wavefunction can be written in the position basis as $$\vert \Psi \rangle = \Psi_x(x,t)$$ or in the momentum basis as ...
4
votes
1answer
554 views

Physical significane and context in which Dirac introduced the Dirac Delta function

I'd like to know the exact context in which Paul Dirac introduced the Dirac delta function. What was the physical significance of the Dirac delta function when he first used it in Physics ?
5
votes
0answers
99 views

What can quantum adiabatic computation provably accomplish?

Let's say I have a quantum adiabatic computer in a black-box that works perfectly, doesn't suffer from decoherence/noise problems, etc. Are there any proven bounds for an adiabatic algorithm that ...
1
vote
0answers
141 views

Question on energies obtained via WKB approximation

Suppose we are given an ODE problem $$ y''(x)+V(x)f(x)=E_{n} y(x) $$ with boundary conditions $ y(0)=y(\infty)=0$. Here $V(x)$ is a potential function. Then is it always true that (for $n ...
12
votes
2answers
400 views

The entropic cost of tying knots in polymers

Imagine I take a polymer like polyethylene, of length $L$ with some number of Kuhn lengths $N$, and I tie into into a trefoil knot. What is the difference in entropy between this knotted polymer and ...
5
votes
2answers
334 views

Proof that Statistical Mechanics is a model of Themodynamics

The laws of thermodynamics are essentially four axioms of a mathematical theory. The expectation values of a statistical ensemble are supposed to satisfy the axioms of thermodynamics (under the ...
7
votes
1answer
384 views

The role of metric in the Wave Equation

The wave equation is often written in the form $$(\partial^2_t-\Delta)u=0,$$ involving the Laplace-Beltrami operator $\Delta$. However, the Laplace-Beltrami operator $\Delta$ is defined only in the ...
6
votes
1answer
464 views

Boundary Conditions Invariant Under Conformal Transformations in Electrostatics?

in two dimensional electrostatics it is assumed that the whole physical system is translationally invariant in one direction. Here, the two-dimensional Laplace equation $$\Delta \phi(x,y) = ...
2
votes
1answer
186 views

Did classical applications of density functional theory precede its use as an electronic structure method?

Density Functional Theory (DFT) is usually considered an electronic structure method, however a paper by Argaman and Makov highlights the applicability of the DFT formalism to classical systems, such ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

What are the mathematical problems in introducing Spin 3/2 fermions?

Can the physics complications of introducing spin 3/2 Rarita-Schwinger matter be put in geometric (or other) terms readily accessible to a mathematician?
6
votes
1answer
432 views

Why Zeta regularization is not valid for multiple-loops?

Why zeta regularization only valid at one-loop? I mean there are zeta regularizations for multiple zeta sums. Also we could use the zeta regularization iteratively on each variable to obtain finite ...
2
votes
2answers
231 views

What is sector decomposition

What is sector decomposition and how can it be used to 'disentangle' UV and IR divergences? I have read about it in the paper SecDec: A general program for sector decomposition, but I have no idea ...
2
votes
2answers
500 views

Operator relation involving the logarithm of an operator?

Dirac gives the relation: $\exp(iaq)f(q,p) = f(q, p - a\hbar)\exp(iaq)$ where $\hbar$ is Planck's constant. Can anybody give me the corresponding relation when the $\exp$ function is a $\ln$?