The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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0
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2answers
111 views

Photons have no mass. So, why does $E = pc$ hold? [duplicate]

It's a somewhat theoretical question. In special relativity, The energy of a photon is given by $E = pc$. But, my argument is that, since photons have no mass, how can they have a momentum $p$? The ...
2
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1answer
40 views

How do gauginos and scalars gain masses after gauge-mediated symmetry breaking?

In the minimal-GMSB model, the messenger fields transform under the MSSM gauge group and connect a so-called hidden sector to the visible sector. These meesenger fields (left-handed chiral ...
2
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2answers
43 views

Why do the $1/2$ factor appear in the Majorana mass Lagrangian?

In case of Dirac neutrino there is no $1/2$ factor in the mass Lagrangian but for Majorana type neutrino there is a half factor in the mass Lagrangian.
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4answers
375 views

Mass-Energy relation

Einstein mass- energy relation states $E=mc^2$. It means if energy of a paricle increases then mass also increases or vice-versa. My question is that what is the actual meaning of the statement ...
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6answers
5k views

Which way does the scale tip?

I found the problem described in the attached picture on the internet. In the comment sections there were two opposing solutions. So it made me wonder which of those would be the actual solution. So ...
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0answers
23 views

What is the mass to balance this pivot system with a pulley [on hold]

How do I calculate Mass 2 for the following system to balance this system.. The brown lines represent a wooden frame which is not attached to the green block. Mass 1 is attached to rope which is ...
1
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1answer
79 views

Significance of angle in relativistic mass equation

I was playing with $$M=\frac{m_0}{\sqrt{1-v^2/c^2}}$$ and when I put $v=c\sin\theta$, I got $$M=m_0\sec\theta.$$ And this new equation is appearing so beautiful and attracting to me that I was ...
3
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1answer
74 views

The FRW universe is NOT asymptotically flat? Its mass?

The Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric in the comoving coordinates $(t,r,\theta,\varphi)$ which describes a homogeneous and isotropic universe is $$ ds^2\,= -dt^2+\frac{a(t)^2}{1-kr^2}\,dr^2 + ...
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1answer
2k views

Terminal velocity of two equally shaped/sized objects with different weights?

I've tried doing research on this and there are some similar questions. However, they have slightly different scenarios and to make sure I understand things perfectly, I wanted to word it into my ...
2
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2answers
54 views

Deceleration rate of objects of different mass but the same otherwise

Using a tennis ball as an example object, if one ball weighs 1 ounce and the other is 2 ounces, and both are struck at 100 mph on the same trajectory, would there be any difference in the deceleration ...
5
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2answers
364 views

An atomic bomb explodes inside of an “unbreakable” container which is on a scale. Does the “weight” of the container change?

This may or may not be an incredibly stupid thought experiment, but a short time ago I read that most of the "mass" in the proton was actually energy from the quarks and gluons, as opposed to the ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Glashow-Weinberg-Salam mass terms

At the end of spontaneous symmetry breaking I get these mass terms: $$W_{\mu}^{\pm}=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\bigl(W_{\mu}^{1} \mp i W_{\mu}^{2} \bigr )$$ $$\mathcal{L}_{mass}=\frac{1}{2} g^2 \frac{v^2}{4} ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Reduced mass and harmonic mean

In two-body problems, a reduced mass has the form: $\frac{m_1 m_2}{m_1+m_2}$, which by appearance, is half of the harmonic mean of $m_1$ and $m_2$: ...
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3answers
80 views

How can gravity affect light?

I understand that a black hole bends the fabric of space time to a point that no object can escape. I understand that light travels in a straight line along spacetime unless distorted by gravity. If ...
6
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2answers
221 views

What is the meaning of negative mass (in a SUSY spectrum)?

I was playing around with SuSpect to generate some SUSY mass spectrums and I'm often encountering situations where I get a negative neutralino mass. What is the physical meaning of this negative ...
1
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2answers
232 views

Is light affected by gravity? Why?

I would like to know if light is affected by gravity, also, I would like to know what is the correct definition of gravity: "A force that attracts bodies with mass" or "a force that attracts bodies ...
1
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1answer
78 views

Could the center of the combined mass of the entire galaxy change if there were no external forces acting on that galaxy?

Everything in the galaxy orbits the center of the combined mass of the entire galaxy. So could the center of the combined mass of the entire galaxy change if there were no external forces acting on ...
1
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1answer
57 views

When you breath in a helium balloon, do you lose weight?

We all know the trick of breathing in a helium balloon to get a funny squeaky voice! When you do this, would it be correct to say you lose weight? On the one hand, the helium should make you more ...
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5answers
2k views

Is mass an observable in Quantum Mechanics?

One of the postulates of QM mechanics is that any observable is described mathematically by a hermitian linear operator. I suppose that an observable means a quantity that can be measured. The mass ...
2
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1answer
72 views

Does distance traveled by a vehicle after its engine has been switched off depend on its mass at all?

A vehicle moving with some velocity on a rough horizontal road finally comes to rest after its engine has been turned off. Intuitively, it seems a vehicle with greater mass would stop first because it ...
0
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2answers
54 views

Discrepancy ( or Confusion ) in the mass of photon

$E$ = $mc^2$ And also $E$ = $hf$ (f - frequency) And hence Einstein said $m$ = $hf\over c^2$ And so photons have mass But later he also said $M$ = $M_0\over \sqrt {1-v^2/c^2}$ Where if we put $v ...
3
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1answer
63 views

How muscle force work? [closed]

If muscle works with force on joint and joint works with exact force on muscle(newton III law) how can muscle drag much heavier weight than itself?
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3answers
79 views

Finding the mass of pure matter [closed]

How would I find the mass of "pure" matter, that is, non-quantized matter, for a given volume?Let's say I have a volume equal to 1 meter squared, and I completely filled it up with matter - that is, ...
3
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2answers
310 views

Why should mass be attractive in nature?

Why does a mass attract all the masses around it? Why should't it repel or just stay calm? Why should it be like that?
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1answer
41 views

Coupled Spring System (3 mass 3 springs)

Hello I am having trouble trying to find the correct model for this coupled spring system. The scenario is the following we have: Ceiling - Spring - Mass(1) - Spring(2) - Mass(2) - Spring (3) - ...
4
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2answers
792 views

What is the optimal weight for a golf ball?

I am 32 now, and have forgotten the basic physics formulas we used in school. I am sitting with a question that is bugging me. If I had to hit two golf balls of different weight with the same force, ...
1
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0answers
18 views

Could symmetric molecular stretching cause a physical object to become amorphous? [closed]

I understand very little of this, but my google-foo has yielded me next to nothing, I thought I might then just ask. My real question here is if it might be possible through the use of vibration to ...
2
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2answers
73 views

Higgs field and masses of particles

Interaction of particle with Higgs field provides mass to the particles, then why still some particles are massless?
2
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1answer
95 views

Mass term in the Lagrangian

I have read that the mass term appearing in the electroweak Lagrangian stops it (the Lagrangian) from becoming gauge invariance. Can someone explain where and why this term is creating the problem?
7
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2answers
620 views

If a neutrino has a rest frame, why can't a photon have a rest frame as well?

Concerning Rest Frame Wikipedia states: For example, in the rest frame of a neutrino particle travelling from the Crab Nebula supernova to Earth the supernova occurred in the 11th Century AD ...
1
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2answers
96 views

Subatomic particle mass and Benford's Law

Nine out of 15 subatomic particle masses begin with the digit one. Benford's Law would imply 30% with one as the leading digit. Is there any significance to this frequency distribution, such as ...
0
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2answers
138 views

How can individual photons have different amounts of energy?

If photon is an elementary particle, how can different photons have different energy, if $E=mc^2$ and all photons have (or don't have) the same mass and the speed of photon is constant shouldn't it ...
4
votes
1answer
99 views

Why is effective mass of holes positive?

i am trying to understand this. I know that the effective mass of electrons or holes is calculated as: $$m^* = \frac{h^2}{(4\pi^2)\frac{d^2E}{dk^2}}$$ Now,if i look at this plot for example: I ...
4
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1answer
75 views

If virtual particles have negative mass why do they contribute positive mass to atoms?

According to Lawrence Krauss, atoms containing in our body consists of merely 10% (if I remember correctly) of our total mass. The rest come from virtual particles popping in and out of existence from ...
1
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1answer
44 views

calculating electrodynamic momentum of a dumbbell (consisting of two point charges) in longitudinal motion

I'm working through a paper on momentum in electrodynamics that requires the integration below and would greatly appreciate any help. I'm pretty sure it evaluates to $2/d$ but I can't quite figure ...
1
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1answer
76 views

Does spin-0 or spin-2 describe massive or massless particles?

spin-0 is massive or massless? How does we separate the massive and massless degrees of freedom for spin-2? What is the partially massive?
2
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1answer
30 views

Why is the metric linearized to determine the mass spectrum of five dimensional Kaluza-Klein?

In this review about Kaluza-Klein theories, (page 1115) in order to determine the mass spectrum of the 5 dimensional theory the metric is expanded to first order. Why this? Why not retain the full ...
3
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1answer
132 views

Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

In Spontaneous symmetry breaking we have got that, a field $$\phi= \pm \sqrt{\frac{-m^2}{\lambda}}.$$ Now in order to get the unstable minima we need to guess the mass $m^2 <0 $. But can mass be ...
1
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2answers
73 views

Is the concept of rest mass correct?

Is the concept of rest mass correct? All these years, we (me, and my classmates of Undergraduate 1st Year) have been accustomed to the concept of rest-mass, and the relativistic transformation of ...
1
vote
3answers
100 views

Do massless particles follow the curved spacetime or not?

I am assuming that zero (rest) mass particles don't interact gravitationally with each other and other particles. Does that mean they experience a "flat" spacetime instead of a curved one? I find it a ...
2
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2answers
61 views

Mass of air inside air balloon

I have an exercise here with a solution. The basic outline of the problem is: Calculate the mass of air inside a hot air balloon, given the mass of the air balloon at rest is $m_b = ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Follow up question regarding: Deceleration rate of objects of different mass but the same otherwise

My first question was answered here: Deceleration rate of objects of different mass but the same otherwise . But based on that, here is a follow-up question (I also edited my first post with the ...
67
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16answers
125k views

How Does Mass Leave the Body When you Lose Weight?

When your body burns calories and you lose weight, obviously mass is leaving your body. In what form does it leave? In other words, what is the physical process by which the body loses weight when ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

If there turns out to be matter with negative mass, would there also be antimatter with negative mass?

I just heard of the concept of negative mass. Googling led me to see that the concept of negative mass is often contrasted with antimatter. This made me to wonder whether there would then also be a ...
1
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0answers
72 views

Is inertia actually a property of the force rather than the mass?

I ask this because it occurred to me that the inertial property of mass only actually arises in the context of forces (such as the EM force) as a resistance to their accelerating effect. Inertia plays ...
6
votes
5answers
238 views

Acceleration in $F=ma$

I tried to ask this question in Electrical Engineering Stackexchange but was told I was better asking here. Newton's Second Law of Motion states that the vector sum of the forces $\mathbf{F}$ on an ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Can matter be created from energy? [duplicate]

The small, hot, dense early universe the size of an atom was made up entirely of energy, it wasn't until after the expansion began and the universe cooled down some of that energy began converting ...
15
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3answers
785 views

The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories

Consider a free theory with one real scalar field: $$ \mathcal{L}:=-\frac{1}{2}\partial _\mu \phi \partial ^\mu \phi -\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi ^2. $$ We write this positive coefficient in front of $\phi ^2$ ...
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1answer
30 views

Force felt by capacitor mounted on printed circuit board

I have a printed circuit board with a surface mount electrolytic capacitor soldered to it. It has two spindly legs that hold up this can, so it can move back and forth on the legs' axis just slightly. ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Analogues of mass, space, or time? [closed]

I began wondering about this when working through this question: is there anything analogous to spacetime or matter? Both spacetime (note: most of what I know of about the concept of spacetime comes ...