The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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182 views

Does the magnitude of a mass affect the velocity?

Imagine that I shrink my entire mass to fit within the volume of a light particle. If I was then 'hit' by another light particle would my greater mass affect my gain in velocity from this collision ...
5
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3answers
3k views

Moment of Inertia (triangular plate)

I want to generalize the formula for the MOI of a triangular plate (sides $a,b,c$) about an axis passing through mid point of one sides and perpendicular to it's plane . The mass of plate $M$ is ...
4
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3answers
248 views

Precision of Coulomb's law

Up to which precision has the coulomb law proven to be true? I.e. if you have two electrons in a vacuum chamber, 5 meters appart, have the third order terms been ruled out? Are there any theoretical ...
2
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2answers
3k views

Does inertia increase with speed?

I have heard that when the speed of the object increase, the mass of the object also increase. (Why does an object with higher speed gain more (relativistic) mass?) So inertia which is related to ...
1
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1answer
164 views

Defining the star as the ellipse focus rather than the barycenter, what does the other focus do? [duplicate]

There are a lot of images and animations on the internet depicting two bodies orbiting around their common barycenter. The barycenter is defined as the (let's say right) focus of the ellipse. If we ...
14
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3answers
7k views

Your Mass is NOT from Higgs Boson

Your Mass is NOT from Higgs Boson? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ztc6QPNUqls This guy can't be correct, right? He argues that because mostly of a nucleus' mass is made out of the space between ...
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3answers
265 views

Mass in special relativity

I have just got a query about how this equation works if its right. We have Newtonian Physics saying $F=ma$, According to the 'Mass in special relativity' the mass changes according to $$m= ...
1
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1answer
403 views

Why does Lorentz factor not hold for relativistic mass when we apply it to photons? [duplicate]

We know that the photon itself is massless particle $m_0=0$. But we also know, that the mass of the objects does increase with their energy. And we know that under certain circumstances (gravity, ...
14
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3answers
835 views

Does relativistic mass have weight?

If an object was sliding on an infinitely long friction-less floor on Earth with relativistic speeds (ignoring air resistance), would it exert more vertical weight force on the floor than when it's at ...
6
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3answers
405 views

Is it possible to have a singularity with zero mass?

A singularity, by the definition I know, is a point in space with infinite of a property such as density. Density is Mass/Volume. Since the volume of a singularity is 0, then the density will thus ...
0
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1answer
183 views

Is the speed of light related to the mass of the universe?

If the mass of the universe were cut in half, would it affect the speed of light? Would it be twice as fast? Would it stay the same? Do we have instruments that are sensitive enough to measure the ...
3
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2answers
305 views

Do photons have mass? [duplicate]

As a student in a highschool physics class, my teacher has repeatedly told me that photons are massless. Yet, I have also heard from other sources that photons have momentum. If photons were to have ...
10
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1answer
391 views

How the inverse square law in electrodynamics is related to photon mass?

I have read somewhere that one of the tests of the inverse square law is to assume nonzero mass for photon and then, by finding a maximum limit for it , determine a maximum possible error in ...
0
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1answer
103 views

Period of oscilation [duplicate]

Two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ are connected by a spring of spring constant $k$ and slide freely without friction along horizontal track. What is period of oscillation? No force influence.
2
votes
2answers
118 views

Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely?

As the title suggests, Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely? I am aware any mass produces and effects gravity but couldn't find ...
0
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2answers
2k views

What is the mass of a photon moving at the speed of light? [duplicate]

What is the mass of a photon moving at the speed of light? And if it does not have mass, how is it affected by gravity? Also why does Einstein's general relativity support that a gravitational wave ...
5
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1answer
323 views

How did Newton find out force has something to do with acceleration?

Its about Newton's second law of motion, $$F=ma.$$ It says the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force and is inversely proportional to the object's mass. Yes I can ...
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3answers
281 views

Mass equals Moment of inertia when constant density?

I have found equation for moment of inertia $(J)$. I'm calculating $J$ for hemisphere, with rotational axis $Z$. $$ J = \iiint\limits_V r^2 \cdot \rho \cdot dV $$ But if $\rho$ is constant ...
2
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3answers
300 views

What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
1
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1answer
83 views

A sphere, a simple object?

In this video, the woman says that a sphere is a pretty simple object. What intrigues me is the use of a sphere for such a calculation. First of all, the sphere wouldn't be perfect as a perfect sphere ...
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1answer
113 views

How do we know that light is massless? [duplicate]

Almost everybody knows that light is massless. But where this come from and how it can be proven (experimentally or theoretically)? I actually found this article which explains and calculates the mass ...
4
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1answer
300 views

Mass-energy equivalence and Newton's Second Law of motion

According to Einstein's Mass-energy equivalence, $ E = mc^2$ OR $ m = \frac E{c^2}$..... (1) and According to Newton's Second Law of motion, $ F = ma$ OR $m = \frac Fa$ ..... (2) If we compare eq. ...
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3answers
2k views

Does a photon have mass? [duplicate]

I have seen questions assume photons have no mass. But I have not seen any questions that directly ask whether or not photons have mass. If photons have no mass, then how do they occupy space? How ...
4
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5answers
3k views

Does everything with mass or energy have a gravitational pull?

As small as it may be, does every 'thing' have a gravitational pull? That is, something with mass or energy. No matter how obsolete or negligible it may be, is it there? If so, how is it calculated? ...
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1answer
2k views

Archimedes principle and specific gravity

A physical balance measures the gravitational mass of a body. I conducted an experiment to find out the specific gravity of a bob. I first measured the mass of the bob in air, and then in water. The ...
6
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1answer
149 views

Higgs boson mass and electroweak energy scale

Is it a coincidence that the mass of the Higgs boson is exactly half the electroweak energy scale?
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2answers
63 views

Why does the inertial mass of an object rise when a force is exerted on it in a particle accelerator? [closed]

A particle in a cyclotron requires more and more force to maintain the same acceleration as it accelerates.
4
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1answer
155 views

Soft Mass and Physical Mass in Softly-broken SUSY

In softly broken SUSY, the bare mass parameters may be specified at e.g. the GUT scale, and then we can run these down to another scale using RGEs, similar in form to the RGEs for gauge couplings, ...
2
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1answer
189 views

Law of conservation of matter

If scientist have made small particles of matter then why do we still haw the law of conservation of matter? Is it because the few particles don't make a noticeable difference in our life?
3
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1answer
468 views

Have negative pressures any physical meaning?

Some cubic thermodynamical equations of state predict negative pressures, have negative pressures any physical meaning? Could they be related to negative mass?
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4answers
1k views

Can you create mass with $E=mc^2$?

If you use the equation $E=mc^2$ could you make matter by dividing the $c^2$? I'm sorry if this is a really stupid sounding question or if it shouldn't be asked here.
3
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2answers
160 views

Gravitational distortion of an object's diameter, at a distance,

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are? What is the relationship between the optical distortion and the mass of the objects?
16
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3answers
884 views

The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories

Consider a free theory with one real scalar field: $$ \mathcal{L}:=-\frac{1}{2}\partial _\mu \phi \partial ^\mu \phi -\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi ^2. $$ We write this positive coefficient in front of $\phi ^2$ ...
0
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0answers
53 views

What causes the mass of Higgs boson itself? [duplicate]

Current theories stipulate that particles mass is due to : Quantum chromodynamics (mutual attraction of quarks, i.e. gluon's kinetic energy, circa 98%) and Higgs field (quarks rest mass, circa 2%) ...
2
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1answer
106 views

Sitting on the bob of a pendulum

Walter Lewin's best performance was the pendulum demonstration, and I copy the transcript now: Would the period come out to be the same or not? [students respond] Some of you think it's ...
5
votes
1answer
704 views

Why do some particles have a greater mass than others?

The property of mass that almost every particle possesses comes from the Higgs Field. It is this field, which permeates all of space, that particles interact with and hence obtain mass. But why do ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Modeling a two-mass, spring, damper system

I'm trying to model a system with two masses, two springs, two dampers, and one applied force using transfer functions. I'll then be inputting it into Simulink. The system looks like this but there ...
2
votes
2answers
785 views

Do photons actually generate a slight kinetic force?

My question is even though photons have no (rest) mass, do they emit a external force due to EM radiation causing electrons to be excited and jump to higher energy shells which electrons have mass ...
4
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2answers
1k views

What is the optimal weight for a golf ball?

I am 32 now, and have forgotten the basic physics formulas we used in school. I am sitting with a question that is bugging me. If I had to hit two golf balls of different weight with the same force, ...
5
votes
1answer
346 views

Practical method to weigh human limbs with common household items?

What methods could be used to determine (or estimate within a reasonable margin of error) the mass of a living human's limbs, short of cutting them off? And more interestingly, how can this be done ...
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2answers
333 views

Is light affected by gravity? Why?

I would like to know if light is affected by gravity, also, I would like to know what is the correct definition of gravity: "A force that attracts bodies with mass" or "a force that attracts bodies ...
1
vote
1answer
769 views

Does gravitational force attract bodies with mass or with energy?

On my textbook is written that gravitational force is the force that attracts bodies with mass. But I've seen on a book that It actually attracts bodies with energy. I'm having a class tomorrow and I ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between impulse and momentum?

What is the difference between impulse and momentum? The question says it all...I know the second of of them is mass * velocity, but what is the first one for, and when is it used? Also, what are its ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
3
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4answers
14k views

Relationship between mass, energy, and a force?

I've never truly understood the relationship between mass, energy, and force. I know what each of the three are, I just don't fully understand how they interact with each other. For example, How ...
0
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3answers
204 views

Which is the right electron mass?

When particles mass can be changed by changing the website, then how to calculate with confidence? For example: Google: electron mass = 9.10938 188 × 10$^-31$ kilograms Wikipedia: electron mass ...
1
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2answers
194 views

What is mass of free up and down Quark?

Quarks combine to form composite particles called hadrons, the most stable of which are protons and neutrons, the components of atomic nuclei. Due to a phenomenon known as color confinement, quarks ...
5
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2answers
742 views

Impulse from absorbing a photon? Is there an increase in rest mass?

I'm going through A P French's special relativity. In one chapter (6) the following is set up: Suppose that a stationary particle of mass $M_0$ is struck by a photon of energy $Q$, which is ...
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0answers
167 views

How can I calculate all of the tensions in the cords? [closed]

I have been stuck on this problem for the last half, and to be honest I don't even no where to begin. I'm being asked to calculate all of tensions for the cords. I know I'm supposed to use $\cos$ to ...
1
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2answers
428 views

Gravity and free fall

In Wikipedia it's stated that "[..] gravity, is the natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses". Then I found many examples ...