The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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254 views

The impossible possibility - weightless mass

I have a hypothetical question about inertia. Let's say I have an object with inertial mass a ton (2,000 lbs.), and it is sitting in my front yard, for instance. If it would suddenly become immune ...
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2answers
229 views

Why equivalence principle is principle and not law?

We can prove that the inertial mass and the gravitational mass should be the same (equivalence principle) from the $f=mg=ma$ then $g=a$, so we have equivalence law! But why we said equivalence ...
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2answers
1k views

Free fall of two spheres made of same materials, different masses, with air resistance

Two people falling with the same parachute will gain different speeds if their masses are different. The upward air drag will needed to be bigger for a heavier person, since gravitational force is ...
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1answer
73 views

Is mass of the parent star is equal to the mass of the born blackhole

I want to know whether mass of the black hole which has born from a star is similar to its parent star or not. whether the born black hole will have high or low mass comparing to its parent star. ...
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1answer
2k views

Calculate mass of air in a tyre from pressure

How can one calculate the mass of air inside a tyre, given a particular tyre size; a pressure, in $kPa = \frac{1000kg}{m\cdot s^2}$; and assuming room temperature, and normal air composition? I can't ...
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3answers
661 views

How come a photon acts like it has mass in a superconducting field?

I've heard the Higgs mechanism explained as analogous to the reason that a photon acts like it has mass in a superconducting field. However, that's not too helpful if I don't understand the latter. ...
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2answers
186 views

Do particles gain mass only at energy levels found during the big bang?

I am trying to make sure my understanding is correct. At energies and temperatures found during the big bang (or at CERN recently), the Higgs mechanism comes into effect. When it does, there is a ...
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1answer
235 views

Lepton masses in the Standard Model

Some simple questions regarding leptonic masses in the Standard Model (SM): Why there is not an explicit mass term in addition to the effective mass term that arises from the Yukawa terms after ...
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2answers
377 views

Does the potential energy related to a particle determines its rest mass?

Would it be possible to determine the rest mass of a particle by computing the potential energy related to the presence (existence) of the particle, if this potential energy could be determined ...
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2answers
609 views

What sort of “mass” is explained by the Higgs mechanism?

When I asked this question (probably in a less neutral form) to physicists, their answer was something along the lines that it's not gravity (i.e. unrelated to gravitons) but inertial mass. (So I ...
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2answers
450 views

Why is Gravitational force proportional to the masses?.

We know that two mass particles attract each other with a force $$F~=~\frac{G M_1 M_2}{r^2}.$$ But what is the reason behind that? Why does this happen?
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5answers
2k views

Why Gravity attracts all objects with the same speed?

Why Gravity attracts all objects with the same speed? Is this question was solved? What is the exact answer?
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1answer
113 views

Are there any well-known theories successfully unifying the inertial and gravitational mass?

From what little I know of general relativity, the equality of inertial and gravitational mass is an axiom of the theory. I suspect that this precludes GR from unifying them in the same sense as ...
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2answers
382 views

Why are particles different sizes?

Is it correct in saying that a particles size is it's rest energy, and that particles don't actually have size (in the way you get different size objects)? What defines what sizes a particle can be? ...
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3answers
2k views

Relation between Newtons and Kilograms

Work is expressed as W=F*d, where the F is in Newton, d is in meters and result ...
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3answers
951 views

Why can't gauge bosons have mass?

Clearly, a mass term for a vector field would render the Lagrangian not gauge-invariant, but what are the consequences of this? Gauge invariance is supposed to be crucial for the renormalisation of a ...
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1answer
122 views

Flow of freezing liquid or a melting solid

If a liquid is freezing, is equation of continuity violated? As the liquid flows, some portion of it is getting frozen. The mass of the fluid thus keeps dropping. Similarly, when a molten fluid flows ...
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3answers
2k views

Why does a semiconductor hole have a mass?

I have read that holes in semiconductor are nothing but vacancies created by electrons. But how can this vacancy i.e. hole has a mass?
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2answers
786 views

If quarks didn't have mass, could protons (and neutrons) exist?

I read here (mass of a proton) that the mass of a proton is mostly (99%) due to the energy of the strong nuclear force which binds the quarks together, and not the actual mass of the quarks. My ...
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2answers
196 views

How can a pion have a mass, given it's a “field mediator” and created/destroyed continuously?

Maybe some of my assumptions here are basically wrong, but isn't it true that pion is the "mediator" for the strong force field. the quantum field theory basically says that there are no fields, ...
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3answers
318 views

Does Standard Model confirm that mass assigned by Higgs Mechanism creates gravitational field?

I am not comparing passive gravitational mass with rest inertial mass. Is there an evidence in Standard Model which says that active gravitational mass is essentially mass assigned by Higgs mechanism. ...
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1answer
287 views

How to calculate Rest Mass practically with Standard Model?

With relativistic physics, we can apply force to see resistance against acceleration. It'd give us relativistic mass and we have well established formula to get to the Rest Mass as long as we know the ...
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4answers
2k views

How does Higgs Boson get the rest mass? [duplicate]

Higgs Boson detected at LHC is massive. It has high relativistic mass means it has non-zero rest mass. Higgs Boson gives other things rest mass. But, how does it get rest mass by itself?
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2answers
923 views

Does Dark Matter interact with Higgs Field?

Dark matter does have gravitational mass as we know from its discovery. Does it have inertial mass?
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7answers
9k views

Is a hard drive heavier when it is full?

Browsing Quora, I saw the following question with contradicting answers. For the highest voted answer: The bits are represented by certain orientations of magnetic fields which shouldn't have ...
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3answers
2k views

Why is Higgs Boson given the name “The God Particle”?

Higgs Boson (messenger particle of Higgs field) accounts for inertial mass, not gravitational mass. So, how could it account for formation of universe as we know it today? I think, gravity accounts ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the difference between pole and running mass?

For example, when we meassure Higgs boson mass to be 125 GeV, do we think about renormalized or pole mass? Should the mass of the Higgs change if it is produced at higher energies?
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2answers
2k views

Why do we need Higgs field to re-explain mass, but not charge?

We already had definition of mass based on gravitational interactions since before Higgs. It's similar to charge which is defined based on electromagnetic interactions of particles. Why did Higgs ...
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1answer
225 views

Why not accurate masses of elementary particles?

In the standard model of particle accuracy in calculating mass is very low. And you can not predict the upper limit of Higgs particle mass accurately. Why not accurate masses of elementary particles?
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1answer
322 views

Why are all observable gauge theories not vector-like?

Why are all observable gauge theories not vector-like? Will this imply that the electron and/or fermions do not have mass? How is this issue resolved? Background: The Standard Model is a ...
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4answers
452 views

Does $p=mc$ hold for photons?

Known that $E=hf$, $p=hf/c=h/\lambda$, then if $p=mc$, where $m$ is the (relativistic) mass, then $E=mc^2$ follows directly as an algebraic fact. Is this the case?
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2answers
4k views

How does the Higgs Boson gain mass itself?

If the Higgs field gives mass to particles, and the Higgs boson itself has mass, does this mean there is some kind of self-interaction? Also, does the Higgs Boson have zero rest mass and so move at ...
3
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3answers
490 views

What does “nearly infinite mass” mean?

I am sure this is a silly question, but I was reading something that described the pre big-bang universe as having "nearly infinite mass." How can something be "nearly" infinite? The term seems to ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Transforming a sound wave into a literal light wave. Is it possible? [duplicate]

Literally transforming sound into an actual light wave seems almost impossible. But transforming the sound wave into a light wave while containing a single mass? I know that sound can contain a mass ...
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1answer
206 views

The role of dark matter in black holes and star formation

In my understanding, there exists a critical mass for which a star needs to be in order for it to collapse into a black hole. This also applies to a certain critical density of gas in order for stars ...
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1answer
78 views

Space station gains enough mass to lose orbit?

I.S.S is constantly being improved (add-ons). Will the space station need to be moved to a higher orbit at some point?
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2answers
572 views

Conservation of momentum equation, how do I factor out v0Final and v1Final?

I am trying to figure out an equation for conservation of momentum. So, If combined momentum before and after the collision is the same, and momentum is velocity times mass, then for 2 objects (A,B), ...
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1answer
367 views

The Strength Of A Black Hole

Does the gravitational strength of a black hole at its singularity change the more it pulls things into it?
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2answers
15k views

How exactly does mass affect speed?

I konw that mass affects weight (force), so how does that relate to speed? F=ma. so how does all this affect speed?
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3answers
124 views

Carrying water on person, or on the frame when bicycling

So, the question is as follows: What is the difference in work exerted by the rider in the two following scenarios? a) Rider + bike. Water carried in a holder on the frame b) Rider + bike. Water ...
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1answer
208 views

Clarification of rest mass

So I have only just been introduced to the concept of rest mass in Special Relativity. Do we assume that the rest mass of a fundamental particle is constant in all inertial reference frames? i.e. is ...
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1answer
356 views

How does a star wobble due to orbiting bodies

What equations determine how a star wobbles in response to an orbiting planet, and can it be used to determine the mass of distant objects based on the wobble? If there are other more reliable ...
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4answers
7k views

Why is force described as rate of change of momentum? [closed]

momentum = mass * velocity Differentiating both sides leads to force = mass * acceleration since the mass doesn't participate in the differentiation as it is constant. Is this a sound ...
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2answers
1k views

How do you weigh a box on a scale whose limit is too low?

As you will see I know nothing about physics and after being asked to solve a physics problem in a recent interview wanted to ask it of professionals and see what the response would be: I have a set ...
4
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3answers
867 views

Infinite acceleration?

Why is acceleration regulated by mass? In a frictionless environment, why doesn't an object move at infinite acceleration if force is applied on it? Force causes movement, so unless there is an ...
3
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1answer
139 views

Neutrino Oscillation and their gravitational implications

As I understand neutrinos, there are three different flavors, all with different masses. Although the masses of these neutrinos have not been directly measured, their mass differences have been. ...
2
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2answers
195 views

Which new insight did $E=mc^2$ give us?

I had a special relativity course at university. Now I'm trying to extract what new insight $E=mc^2$ did give us. I mean that moving mass has/is energy (kinetic) not new. The energy merely changed ...
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3answers
723 views

Special Relativity and $E = mc^2$

I read somewhere that $E=mc^2$ shows that if something was to travel faster than the speed of light then they would have infinite mass and would have used infinite energy. How does the equation show ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
2
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1answer
285 views

Mass of Milky Way Supermassive Black Hole

I am looking at data from Andrea Ghez (2005; ADS link) which states the mass of the supermassive black hole in the MW. Here's what I don't understand: She reports the value as $3.7 \times 10^6 ...