The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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684 views

The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories

Consider a free theory with one real scalar field: $$ \mathcal{L}:=-\frac{1}{2}\partial _\mu \phi \partial ^\mu \phi -\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi ^2. $$ We write this positive coefficient in front of $\phi ^2$ ...
6
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1answer
118 views

Higgs boson mass and electroweak energy scale

Is it a coincidence that the mass of the Higgs boson is exactly half the electroweak energy scale?
0
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2answers
47 views

Why does the inertial mass of an object rise when a force is exerted on it in a particle accelerator? [closed]

A particle in a cyclotron requires more and more force to maintain the same acceleration as it accelerates.
2
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1answer
143 views

Law of conservation of matter

If scientist have made small particles of matter then why do we still haw the law of conservation of matter? Is it because the few particles don't make a noticeable difference in our life?
5
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4answers
717 views

Can you create mass with $E=mc^2$?

If you use the equation $E=mc^2$ could you make matter by dividing the $c^2$? I'm sorry if this is a really stupid sounding question or if it shouldn't be asked here.
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3answers
329 views

Could a bubble of photons make a spaceship massless?

I'm not sure how theoretically possible this is but my question is... If we could somehow make a perfect bubble of photons (a massless bubble) and put a spaceship inside it, could it therefore ...
3
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4answers
862 views

Do we say that phonon has effective mass through its dispersion relation?

The effective mass is proportional to the second derivative of the dispersion relation d2k/dE2. Do we say that phonon have effective mass through it ? Spin wave have.
3
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1answer
286 views

Effects of parallel superconducting plates

Assuming the existence of virtual particle field ( zero point energy field) Casimir force is produced by 2 parallel conducting plates excluding some of the frequencies between the plates, if these 2 ...
3
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2answers
4k views

Modeling a two-mass, spring, damper system

I'm trying to model a system with two masses, two springs, two dampers, and one applied force using transfer functions. I'll then be inputting it into Simulink. The system looks like this but there ...
0
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0answers
51 views

What causes the mass of Higgs boson itself? [duplicate]

Current theories stipulate that particles mass is due to : Quantum chromodynamics (mutual attraction of quarks, i.e. gluon's kinetic energy, circa 98%) and Higgs field (quarks rest mass, circa 2%) ...
2
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1answer
94 views

Sitting on the bob of a pendulum

Walter Lewin's best performance was the pendulum demonstration, and I copy the transcript now: Would the period come out to be the same or not? [students respond] Some of you think it's ...
2
votes
2answers
323 views

Do photons actually generate a slight kinetic force?

My question is even though photons have no (rest) mass, do they emit a external force due to EM radiation causing electrons to be excited and jump to higher energy shells which electrons have mass ...
22
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5answers
3k views

Do photons gain mass when they travel through glass?

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that photons slow down when travelling through glass. Does this mean they gain mass? Otherwise, what happens to extra kinetic energy? I understand now ...
5
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1answer
247 views

Practical method to weigh human limbs with common household items?

What methods could be used to determine (or estimate within a reasonable margin of error) the mass of a living human's limbs, short of cutting them off? And more interestingly, how can this be done ...
5
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2answers
701 views

If quarks didn't have mass, could protons (and neutrons) exist?

I read here (mass of a proton) that the mass of a proton is mostly (99%) due to the energy of the strong nuclear force which binds the quarks together, and not the actual mass of the quarks. My ...
5
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3answers
3k views

What is the difference between impulse and momentum?

What is the difference between impulse and momentum? The question says it all...I know the second of of them is mass * velocity, but what is the first one for, and when is it used? Also, what are its ...
1
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1answer
160 views

Is light affect by gravity? Why?

I would like to know if light is affected by gravity, also, I would like to know what is the more correct for the definition of gravity: A force that attracts bodies with mass or force that attracts ...
1
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1answer
462 views

Does gravitational force attract bodies with mass or with energy?

On my textbook is written that gravitational force is the force that attracts bodies with mass. But I've seen on a book that It actually attracts bodies with energy. I'm having a class tomorrow and I ...
5
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1answer
434 views

Impulse from absorbing a photon? Is there an increase in rest mass?

I'm going through A P French's special relativity. In one chapter (6) the following is set up: Suppose that a stationary particle of mass $M_0$ is struck by a photon of energy $Q$, which is ...
10
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3answers
2k views

Where does matter come from?

I admit, it's been a few years since I've studied physics, but the following question came to me when I was listening to a talk by Lawrence Krauss. Is there any knowledge of from where matter that ...
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2answers
164 views

What is mass of free up and down Quark?

Quarks combine to form composite particles called hadrons, the most stable of which are protons and neutrons, the components of atomic nuclei. Due to a phenomenon known as color confinement, quarks ...
14
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3answers
1k views

Decay of massless particles

We don't normally consider the possibility that massless particles could undergo radioactive decay. There are elementary arguments that make it sound implausible. (A bunch of the following is ...
29
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7answers
7k views

Is a hard drive heavier when it is full?

Browsing Quora, I saw the following question with contradicting answers. For the highest voted answer: The bits are represented by certain orientations of magnetic fields which shouldn't have ...
1
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0answers
138 views

How can I calculate all of the tensions in the cords? [closed]

I have been stuck on this problem for the last half, and to be honest I don't even no where to begin. I'm being asked to calculate all of tensions for the cords. I know I'm supposed to use $\cos$ to ...
1
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1answer
324 views

Gravity and free fall

In Wikipedia it's stated that "[..] gravity, is the natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses". Then I found many examples ...
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2answers
78 views

Is it part of special relativity that mass possessing energy is more dense?

I was reading http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/hillis/hillis_p2.html and it says that a charged battery weighs more than a dead one or a rotating object weighs more than a stationary one (i.e. mass ...
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2answers
13k views

How exactly does mass affect speed?

I konw that mass affects weight (force), so how does that relate to speed? F=ma. so how does all this affect speed?
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2answers
171 views

What is the mass distribution within the sun?

Jupiter is roughly 1/1000 the total mass of the sun. To get some idea of what effect Jupiter's gravity may have on the sun I'd like to know the approximate mass distribution of the sun. (i.e) the ...
3
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2answers
501 views

Where does the mass term come from in the Proca Lagrangian?

There are many good books describing how to construct the Lagrangian for an electromagnetic field in a medium. $$ \mathcal{L}~=~-\frac{1}{16\pi}F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu}-\frac{1}{c}j^{\nu}A_{\nu} $$ ...
3
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0answers
68 views

Sound level of organ pipe driven by helium

The sound pressure level of an organ pipe is a function of the gas flow rate delivered to the pipe. Source Would the sound level of an organ pipe driven by helium be lower than that of a pipe driven ...
3
votes
1answer
469 views

How does a particle of light reach the max speed of light? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can a photon have no mass and still travel at the speed of light? First of all I am not a professional physicist. I was curious as to how a particle of light can ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Speed of light and lorentzian factors [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can a photon have no mass and still travel at the speed of light? If light travels at the speed of light, and anything with rest mass will experience relativistic ...
1
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2answers
3k views

Preventing a block from sliding on a frictionless inclined plane

I want to demonstrate what force $F$ you would have to exert on an inclined plane of angle $t$, mass $M$ to prevent a block on top of it with mass $m$ from sliding up or down the ramp. I worked out ...
1
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1answer
752 views

Does the increase of (relativistic) mass, while flying near speed of light, has any impact on astronauts? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Would travelling at relativistic speeds have any impact on human biology? I am asking myself this question for a few day. What is the answer on: Does the increase of ...
-4
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3answers
654 views

How can mass affect spacetime?

In General Relativity Theory, mass can warp spacetime. However, in my view interaction only occurs between pieces of matter. Spacetime is not matter; how can it be affected by matter?
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2answers
213 views

Photons in a gravitational field

I have been really staring for a while in a MP-Beiser book and I totally disagree with a statement he does there. On a page 85 he states that photons act as they have a mass $m$. He derives this by ...
3
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4answers
435 views

Does $p=mc$ hold for photons?

Known that $E=hf$, $p=hf/c=h/\lambda$, then if $p=mc$, where $m$ is the (relativistic) mass, then $E=mc^2$ follows directly as an algebraic fact. Is this the case?
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1answer
180 views

Suppose a hollow metal sphere filled with helium is dropped in a body of water

What are the conditions that would cause said sphere to sink or float? What if the sphere was full of ice instead?
0
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1answer
130 views

Effect on mass of Earth if it stops revolving around Sun

If the object in motion gains mass, will it affect the change in mass of Earth if it stops revolving around Sun, since mass is responsible for gravity how will be the gravitational force change?
9
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3answers
1k views

What is the exact gravitational force between two masses including relativistic effects?

I was wondering if there is a closed-form formula for the force between two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ if relativistic effects are included. My understanding is that the classic formula $G \frac{m_1 ...
1
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1answer
138 views

Photons and Relativity

Consider a Photon from Sun and travels with a velocity $c$. Now think we are that photon. For us, it looks like Sun is moving away from us with a velocity $c$. So, why don't we get attracted back ...
2
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4answers
294 views

The building blocks of energy

I have a couple of related questions that have been bothering me for a while. They might sound unscientific, but here is goes: What are the building blocks of energy? What does energy consist of? Is ...
4
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0answers
32 views

Classic mass predictions from Left-Right models with discrete symmetries?

I am covering the classic literature on predictions of Cabibbo angle or other relationships in the mass matrix. As you may remember, this research was a rage in the late seventies, after noticing that ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

How does Higgs Boson get the rest mass?

Higgs Boson detected at LHC is massive. It has high relativistic mass means it has non-zero rest mass. Higgs Boson gives other things rest mass. But, how does it get rest mass by itself?
4
votes
2answers
350 views

Does the Chandrasekhar Limit scale for a Black Hole?

No physicist/astrophysicist I; All I know about the Chandrasekhar limit is that it apparently limits the mass a star may survive, beyond which it degenerates to a neutron star, or a black-hole. Does ...
4
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1answer
442 views

Planetary Gravity and its effects

This is my first question on the Physics portion of Stack Exchange. I was hoping to get some light on the topic of gravity. I don't have much background knowledge of physics so I might as well start ...
2
votes
1answer
275 views

Mass of Milky Way Supermassive Black Hole

I am looking at data from Andrea Ghez (2005; ADS link) which states the mass of the supermassive black hole in the MW. Here's what I don't understand: She reports the value as $3.7 \times 10^6 ...
6
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1answer
2k views

How do we know the masses of single stars?

I have recently read that we can only know the masses of stars in binary systems, because we use Kepler's third law to indirectly measure the mass. However, it is not hard to find measurements for the ...
0
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2answers
210 views

Why equivalence principle is principle and not law?

We can prove that the inertial mass and the gravitational mass should be the same (equivalence principle) from the $f=mg=ma$ then $g=a$, so we have equivalence law! But why we said equivalence ...
2
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0answers
194 views

Do all the particles acquire mass in the Standard Model due to the Higgs mechanism only?

I know that a mass term for an intermediate boson is not compatible with the gauge symmetry. But in principle a mass term for the electron field does not violate a gauge symmetry. However to build an ...