The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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What does “nearly infinite mass” mean?

I am sure this is a silly question, but I was reading something that described the pre big-bang universe as having "nearly infinite mass." How can something be "nearly" infinite? The term seems to ...
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Exoplanet Mass-Radius Diagram

I'm currently studying the following diagram: But I'm not entirely sure I understand what's going on. Is it just, that most exoplanets discovered, is pretty much made up of Hydrogen and Helium ? ...
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Why is spacetime curved by mass but not charge?

It is written everywhere that gravity is curvature of spacetime caused by the mass of the objects or something to the same effect. This raises a question with me: why isn't spacetime curved due to ...
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Do all the particles acquire mass in the Standard Model due to the Higgs mechanism only?

I know that a mass term for an intermediate boson is not compatible with the gauge symmetry. But in principle a mass term for the electron field does not violate a gauge symmetry. However to build an ...
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509 views

Weight of empty versus inflated balloon [duplicate]

Will the weight of a balloon filled with air be less than, greater than or the same as the same balloon after it has been deflated?
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Are all fermions massless at high temperatures?

According to the standard model, the electroweak symmetry is unbroken at high temperatures, and therefore all gauge bosons are massless then. But since fermions are said to acquire mass by a different ...
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Does the weight of an hourglass change when sands are falling inside?

An hourglass H weighs h. When it's placed on a scale with all the sand rested in the lower portion, the scale reads weight x where x = h. Now, if you turn the hourglass upside down to let the sand ...
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5answers
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A neutrino has rest-mass and travels at (near) $c$, why isn't its mass/ energy (nearly) infinite?

If the total energy of all three types of neutrinos exceeded an average of 50 eV per neutrino, there would be so much mass in the universe that it would collapse. This limit can be circumvented ...
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Does the (relativistic) mass change? Why?

I learned recently that when an object moves with a velocity comparable to the velocity of light the (relativistic) mass changes. How does this alteration take place?
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Can we determine the force an object exerts by its mass and acceleration?

I understand that the objects acceleration is determined by the force exerted on it, and that the force exerted on it is determined by its acceleration. But, does an object's (named A) acceleration ...
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135 views

Questioning Einstein's view on gravity [duplicate]

Oke, so my mind is blown by Einsteins view on gravity, at least as far as I understand the basics and principles he based his views on. One of the first things that struck me was that most of his ...
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309 views

How can magic be explained with Physics? [closed]

Assuming that, hypothetically, and for this example only, "magic" means things like magical powers. In movies, games, etc. we witness magic; however, it's never explained how it works with regards ...
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What's the difference between centre of mass & centre of gravity for massive bodies?

My book says: For most of the small objects, both are same. But for mammoth ones, they are really different ones. And in a gravity-less environment, COG is absent; COM still exists. Ok, what's ...
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Center of mass finding question [closed]

Find the center of mass the rod in the figure if λ (the mass per unit lenght) varies with $x$ according to $\lambda=dm/dx=\beta x^2$, where $\beta$ is a constant. Sorry for quality of picture. I am ...
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1answer
304 views

What would happen if a negative mass crossed the event horizon of a black hole?

If negative mass really existed and somehow a very fast traveling negative mass object reached near the black hole's event horizon. What would happen when it crosses the event horizon? According to ...
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Is a block of cotton heavier than a block of iron?

if i have a block of cotton and a block of iron each containing a weight of 100 kg when measured on a weighing machine, in reality which one is heaver than the other, which one is heavier and why? ...
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What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?

Look at this here. With respect to the sciences, the atom is obviously not the smallest piece of mass. Apparently, if people have already broken down the atom in to particles smaller than so, why ...
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Which is the heaviest elementary particle? [closed]

Which elementary particle has the greatest rest mass? (For the sake of this question I'll call a photon's rest mass 0, whether it is or isn't [actually, tell me if this is the right thing to do]).
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Can Mass be found based on Volume?

I am trying to calculate the mass of an object given the volume of an object without knowing what it is made of. Is there a formula to find out something like this considering the object is on Earth ...
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3answers
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Does an Increase of Force affect the Speed of an object if the acceleration stays constant?

If I had a mass of $100\:\rm{kg}$ accelerating due to gravity, using $F=ma$: $F = 100\:\rm{kg} \times 9.8\:\rm{m/s^2}$ $F = 980 \:\rm N$... If I increased the mass to 200kg, the force would be 1960 ...
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Where does matter come from?

I admit, it's been a few years since I've studied physics, but the following question came to me when I was listening to a talk by Lawrence Krauss. Is there any knowledge of from where matter that ...
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What should density of water be to keep box afloat?

I'm writing a platformer game and my physics engine is Box2D. I have successfully implemented buoyancy, but have a question about mass and density. My player is 80kg, a box has a density of 0.5 and ...
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1answer
187 views

What gives the higgs boson mass? [duplicate]

In light of the discovery of the Higgs boson. The Higgs Boson is a force particle which interacts with matter particles. My question is what does the Higgs Boson interact with to give itself mass.
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1answer
626 views

How does a particle of light reach the max speed of light? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can a photon have no mass and still travel at the speed of light? First of all I am not a professional physicist. I was curious as to how a particle of light can ...
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2answers
517 views

Gravity and free fall

In Wikipedia it's stated that "[..] gravity, is the natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses". Then I found many examples ...
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Relation of gravitational pull with no air friction [duplicate]

I am confused between the gravitational pull and the air friction on the moon. Let me give you an example, I have learned that the greater the mass of the body the more gravitational force it ...
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1answer
33 views

Why the mobilities of holes and electrons are not identical in an intrinsic material?

In an intrinsic material, the lifetime $\tau$ of electrons and holes is the same, so in the equation for mobility, $$\mu = \frac{e\tau}{m^*}$$ the only difference between mobility of electrons an ...
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Is there any Violation of conservation of mass in positron emission?

In positron emission, a proton decays into a neutron, electron, and neutrino. Since the mass of a proton is less than that of a neutron, does that mean that energy is converted into mass in the ...
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161 views

Black Holes: How does a three dimensional object collapse into a singularity & Where does the matter go?

A black hole comes into existence as the result of the core collapse of enormous stars, which lose quite some mass in a supernova explosion. However, supermassive black holes are still by any means ...
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What would happen to a teaspoon of neutron star material if released on Earth?

I've read on NASA's page on neutron star that one teaspoonful of that star would weigh over 20 billion tonnes on Earth. If it was somehow possible to bring it to earth would it: Burn and disappear ...
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Does the mass of an electron change with its “energy state”?

When an electron absorbs a photon, it gets into a higher energy state and goes into the upper orbit/shell. Does (rather should) this absorption of energy also have an impact on its mass (although ...
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Is Helicity an intrinsic property of massive Neutrinos?

Hyperphysics states that, unlike an electron, the helicity of a neutrino is invariant because we cannot change to a reference frame where it is different: This and subsequent experiments have ...
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How would the universe be different if the electron mass was twice as large? [closed]

Would the universe even start? Would it collapse or act differently? What if, instead, the mass changed right now? Edit: Since this is too broad lets narrow it to two scenarios: What happens to ...
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Mathematical subtlety in a physics problem

A wagon of initial mass $M$ is moving with an initial velocity $V_o$. Now sand starts accumulating on this wagon, increasing the total mass from $M$ to $M+s$. We have to find the final velocity of ...
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Decay of massless particles

We don't normally consider the possibility that massless particles could undergo radioactive decay. There are elementary arguments that make it sound implausible. (A bunch of the following is ...
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1answer
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Density of a planet

I was wondering, how would you find out about the mass and the density of a planet and what the planet is made of? Finding out about the mass might be possible, because you can observe the movements ...
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1answer
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Higgs field and the null geodesic

How does coupling to the Higgs field take a particle with a spacetime interval of zero and give it a non-zero value, i.e, how does it move it off the null geodesic? [of course, the Higgs field is ...
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Is uncertainty in velocity via HUP reference frame dependent? [duplicate]

Simply put HUP involves position and momentum, further more consider a mass of 1kg. as momentum is mass X velocity = 1X velocity = velocity for calculation purposes. now for a stationary observer the ...
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2answers
571 views

Question of Conservation of Momentum

I think I understand the concept of conservation of momentum in an inelastic collision. However, what if two objects, one being more massive than the other, started out together and then separated ...
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3answers
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Your Mass is NOT from Higgs Boson

Your Mass is NOT from Higgs Boson? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ztc6QPNUqls This guy can't be correct, right? He argues that because mostly of a nucleus' mass is made out of the space between ...
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What role does the Higgs Field play in the universe?

The Higgs field is known as a physical field that covers the entire universe, giving particles their mass. However, that got me thinking if the Higgs field not only gives mass to other particles, but ...
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If a neutrino has a rest frame, why can't a photon have a rest frame as well?

Concerning Rest Frame Wikipedia states: For example, in the rest frame of a neutrino particle travelling from the Crab Nebula supernova to Earth the supernova occurred in the 11th Century AD ...
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Where on Earth does the mass of 1 kg actually produce a 1 kg reading on a digital scale?

Gravity on Earth varies by about 0.1% between poles and equator. If someone was buying/selling something mass critical e.g. gold, where is the standard place on Earth where a 1 kg mass produces a 1 kg ...
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Question about massive spring and SHM [closed]

A mass $M$ is resting on the end of a spring with constant $K$. The mass of the spring is $m$, and the displacement of each element of the spring is proportional to the distance from the fixed end ...
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What Would Negative Mass Do To Spacetime?

It's known that positive mass bends space-time to create a curvature. But if something had negative mass what would it do? Make it flat or like a crest?
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Does the mass of a battery's change when charged/discharged?

... and if so, how much? Is it possible to detect it, or is it beyond any measurement? I'd say there are two possible scenarios (depending on the battery type) and both seem interesting: The battery ...
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2answers
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What is the weight of the Philae lander on the Churyumov–Gerasimenko comet compared to earth?

We know the payload mass of the Philae lander was 21kg. We know the mass of the Churyumov–Gerasimenko comet is roughly 1 x 10^13kg. We know the mass of Earth is roughly 5.9x10^24kg. I've heard ...
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Does rotation increase mass?

If an object is rotated on its axis near the speed of light would its mass increase? Normally if the object was moving (in relationship to the Earth for example) I would agree that its mass would ...
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Is a photon really massless? [duplicate]

If a photon travels at a speed of light and its massless then it must have no energy but this is not the case as we see in photo electric effect. Also help me to know what are photons made of, how are ...
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Mass generation for Z' and W' bosons

I read that some Beyond the Standard Model theories require the existence of additional gauge bosons such as $Z'$ and $W'$. As far as I understood, an extension of the $SU(2)_L$ symmetry is required, ...