The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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Speed of light, lasers and mass

Hopefully this isn't a bad question. Light travels at the speed it does and nothing else can travel that fast because things have mass, correct? Or at least correct on an elementary level. And if ...
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312 views

Why is Planck mass much larger than the smallest mass that we actually know about?

The three fundamental constants $h$, $c$ and $G$ are manipulated and rearranged in different ways to get the Planck time, Planck mass etc. The Planck time is said to be the smallest time possible and ...
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First and Second Moment of Mass

I recently came across the definition of the Center of Mass of a system as the point about which the first moment of mass is zero. Further, it defined Moment of Inertia as the second moment of mass. ...
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83 views

How can we have massive states of strings and CFT on the string worldsheet at the same time?

Ok, so we can have conformal invariance on a string world sheet. However, it is well known that to preserve conformal symmetry we require states to be massless. So how is it that string theories ...
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428 views

Avogadro's number

Could I get an explanation of Avogadro's number and how it relates to determining the mass of a substance? My chemistry textbook only serves to confuse me and the Wikipedia article is aimed towards a ...
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197 views

Is it true that all particles that have a speed less than the speed of light must also have mass?

I've previously learned that massive particles cannot achieve the speed of light. But recently I read that, concerning the gels that refract and bounce light within around enough that it can travel ...
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198 views

Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

In Spontaneous symmetry breaking we have got that, a field $$\phi= \pm \sqrt{\frac{-m^2}{\lambda}}.$$ Now in order to get the unstable minima we need to guess the mass $m^2 <0 $. But can mass be ...
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91 views

Range Of An Interaction

Why is the Compton wavelength $\lambda_c=\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ used as a sensible measure for the range of an interaction, where $m$ is the mass of the corresponding mediator?
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128 views

How can I find the amplitude?

Prove that the motion of a mass $m$ on a linear spring with constant $k$, has the form $$y (t) = A \sin(wt+f),$$ where $t$ is the time and $A, w, f$ are constants. We know that for $t = 0, y(0)=y_{0}$ ...
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100 views

Commercial large scale production of graphene

I am a third year undergraduate Physics student, and for my solid state physics course I am asked to give a short (10 minute) qualitative presentation on the current standings of graphene production, ...
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Moment of Inertia (triangular plate)

I want to generalize the formula for the MOI of a triangular plate (sides $a,b,c$) about an axis passing through mid point of one sides and perpendicular to it's plane . The mass of plate $M$ is ...
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176 views

Soft Mass and Physical Mass in Softly-broken SUSY

In softly broken SUSY, the bare mass parameters may be specified at e.g. the GUT scale, and then we can run these down to another scale using RGEs, similar in form to the RGEs for gauge couplings, ...
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467 views

Difference between baryonic, inertial and gravitational mass? (and relation to dark matter)

Inertial mass: determined from Newton's f = ma Gravitational mass: determined via Newton's law of gravity Baryonic mass: sum of mass of all baryons. Which ones ...
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Calculate stainless steel pole necking limit

Background Trying to determine how much weight a post can support without necking when a monitor is attached to an articulated arm: a cantilever problem. Problem There are three objects involved in ...
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215 views

Origin of quark masses

Does all the mass of the quarks in the standard model come from the Higgs sector or is there also a contribution to quark masses due to QCD chiral symmetry breaking?
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157 views

Why do the $1/2$ factor appear in the Majorana mass Lagrangian?

In case of Dirac neutrino there is no $1/2$ factor in the mass Lagrangian but for Majorana type neutrino there is a half factor in the mass Lagrangian.
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832 views

Why doesn't a wall move when you push it if there's space behind it?

In the first screen you can see that if a person were to push a wall within a typical household the wall would not move while keeping themselves tractioned to the floor. If you push hard and do not ...
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838 views

What the heck is negative effective mass?

I am reading this book:Solid State Electronic Devices by Ben G Streetman and Sanjay Kumar Banerjee. I have some doubts in the article 3.2.2 Effective mass. In this the aythors say that ...
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167 views

Effective mass of a black hole?

Suppose a black hole forms from a given mass of particles such as the core of a star going supernova. The black hole formed will have an effective mass due to the curvature of space time induced. Such ...
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356 views

Understanding the different kinds of mass in gravity

On this site, the Phys.SE question Is there a fundamental reason why gravitational mass is the same as inertial mass? has been asked. See also this Phys.SE question. The 'answer' provided on this ...
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798 views

Does the Chandrasekhar Limit scale for a Black Hole?

No physicist/astrophysicist I; All I know about the Chandrasekhar limit is that it apparently limits the mass a star may survive, beyond which it degenerates to a neutron star, or a black-hole. Does ...
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340 views
+50

Why should the mass of leptons to be near of proton and QCD/chiral scales?

The mystery of the mass of the top being in the electroweak scale can be justified by the Higgs mechanism itself; in some sense the top mass is the only "natural" mass, the other masses of fermions ...
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41 views

Why are $W$ bosons massless above electroweak scale? [duplicate]

Because of the Higgs mechanism, one must replace the Higgs field $\phi$ with $\phi_0 + \phi_1$ where $\phi_0$ is the vacuum expectation value. As far as I understand, the $\phi_0$ gives the mass term ...
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177 views

Reducing massive representation of the Poincare group to the massless one

I want to ask about the connection for massive and massless representation of the Poincare group. Sorry for the awkwardness. First I must to represent the formalism for both of cases. Massive ...
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Planck mass is about the mass of one eyebrow hair

Unlike most Planck units named after "Planck" such as Planck length, Planck temperature, etc, the Planck mass seems more closed to daily life. It is about $10^{-5}$g, same order of magnitude of one ...
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Classic mass predictions from Left-Right models with discrete symmetries?

I am covering the classic literature on predictions of Cabibbo angle or other relationships in the mass matrix. As you may remember, this research was a rage in the late seventies, after noticing that ...
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Is there a finite amount of mass in the universe? [duplicate]

So, I'm not too physics savvy but I am curious to ask. Is there a finite amount of mass in the universe? or is there more and more being created from somewhere or something? If the universe is ...
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Why can't “missing mass” (=dark matter) be photons?

After a star lives and dies, I assume virtually all of its mass would be photons. If enough stars have already lived and died, couldn’t there be enough photon energy out there to account for all ...
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Does the (relativistic) mass change? Why?

I learned recently that when an object moves with a velocity comparable to the velocity of light the (relativistic) mass changes. How does this alteration take place?
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339 views

Is there a connection between gluons and photons?

I was wondering if there is any sort of connection between a gluon and a photon since they are both considered massless.
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2k views

What is difference between Inertial mass and gravitational mass [duplicate]

I recently read that the mass we deal with in Equation $F=Ma$ is called inertial mass and the mass we deal with in $F=Mg$ is gravitational mass. Suppose I am taking a same ball in a free fall and in ...
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1k views

Why does the Standard Model predict Neutrinos are massless?

Why are neutrinos massless in the Standard Model? Is it connected with experimental fact that neutrinos always have only one direction of projection of spin on motion direction?
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391 views

Do photons have mass? [duplicate]

As a student in a highschool physics class, my teacher has repeatedly told me that photons are massless. Yet, I have also heard from other sources that photons have momentum. If photons were to have ...
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664 views

Is a spinning object heavier than a non-spinning object?

Does spinning an object make it heavier? A real-world example: I was mowing the lawn in front of my house, a lawn that tends to have some steep inclines. I realized that the lawn-mower was easier ...
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Why does a semiconductor hole have a mass?

I have read that holes in semiconductor are nothing but vacancies created by electrons. But how can this vacancy i.e. hole has a mass?
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422 views

How quickly does gravity extend from created mass? [duplicate]

I apologize in advance if this is a stupid or off-topic question. Since Energy can be converted into matter according to $E=mc^2$, how fast does it take for the gravity of that new matter to extend ...
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182 views

Do massless particles follow the curved spacetime or not?

I am assuming that zero (rest) mass particles don't interact gravitationally with each other and other particles. Does that mean they experience a "flat" spacetime instead of a curved one? I find it a ...
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314 views

Precision of Coulomb's law

Up to which precision has the coulomb law proven to be true? I.e. if you have two electrons in a vacuum chamber, 5 meters appart, have the third order terms been ruled out? Are there any theoretical ...
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Is it possible to calculate weight of person with sensors found in today's smartphone?

Is it possible to calculate the weight of a person by only using his smartphone, some action he must perform (jump, rotate etc.) and some data like his height or age. Current smartphones have the ...
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524 views

Why are particles different sizes?

Is it correct in saying that a particles size is it's rest energy, and that particles don't actually have size (in the way you get different size objects)? What defines what sizes a particle can be? ...
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730 views

What does “nearly infinite mass” mean?

I am sure this is a silly question, but I was reading something that described the pre big-bang universe as having "nearly infinite mass." How can something be "nearly" infinite? The term seems to ...
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727 views

How to find the center of mass of several objects in a 2d plane?

We have the following scenario in a 2d plane: a big rectangle with a lot of smaller similar uniform rectangles in it, all of them weight differently. Where is the center of mass of this object ...
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447 views

If a photon has no mass, how can it be attracted by the Sun?

I read that the photon doesn't have mass, but my teacher says that the photon has mass because the sun can attract it (like in the experiments to prove the theory of relativity). I think that there ...
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378 views

Why should mass be attractive in nature?

Why does a mass attract all the masses around it? Why should't it repel or just stay calm? Why should it be like that?
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Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
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Do we say that phonon has effective mass through its dispersion relation?

The effective mass is proportional to the second derivative of the dispersion relation d2k/dE2. Do we say that phonon have effective mass through it ? Spin wave have.
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2k views

Does a toy top weigh less when it is spinning?

I am under the understanding that a toy top will weigh less when it is spinning. The Russians made a spinning type transport back in the 70s to lessen its payload over the tundra. Is this an effective ...
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159 views

Can you express mass in other dimensional units?

I'm just started a Physics I course, and while I've paid attention, I'm stuck on one of the first problems: Express mass ($M$) in terms of acceleration($a$), density($D$), area($A$), and time($t$). ...
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634 views

When you breath in a helium balloon, do you lose weight?

We all know the trick of breathing in a helium balloon to get a funny squeaky voice! When you do this, would it be correct to say you lose weight? On the one hand, the helium should make you more ...
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Orbital speed for a circular orbit?

I wanted to look up the formula for orbital speed for a circular orbit on Wikipedia, and I found 2 formulas: All bounded orbits where the gravity of a central body dominates are elliptical in ...