The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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280 views

Will physic object in a perfect environment last/exist forever?

We know,i.e. wood/steel tables in earth will completely broken or disappear in a very future day. If we put the table in a perfect/ideal environment (maybe in vacuum), will the disappear/broken still ...
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1answer
192 views

Photon mass and life time

In this article, the author tried to explain that, Einstein's theory may not valid because he says "photon can decay because it may have minute amount of mass". I'm totally in a conundrum state that ...
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3answers
251 views

What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
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4answers
3k views

Does matter with negative mass exist?

Or does it exist mathematically? Is it really inconsistent with a common-sense, mathematics or known physical laws? As far as I understand, if it exists, it must be far away from the "positive" ...
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2answers
250 views

Travel at the speed of light

Is it me who have a poor understanding, or does all matter have to become 'pure energy' in order to achieve speed-of-light speed? If so, does that mean that no material can achieve the speed of ...
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1answer
109 views

Smallest possible object made of atoms that is spherical to a given degree [closed]

I recently saw a video, World's Roundest Object, which discussed a sphere made of silicon-28. The researcher in the video stated, if the object was scaled to the size of the Earth, the highest and ...
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2answers
170 views

The physics behind The Great Flood [closed]

The book of Genesis floats (pardon the pun) some interesting numbers when discussing the Great Flood. For example, it rained for 40 days and 40 nights, and at the end of that time, the entire planet ...
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1answer
239 views

What is meant by the rest energy of non-composite particle?

When talking about the rest energy of a composite particle such as a proton, part of the rest energy is accounted for by the internal kinetic energy of its constituent quarks. But what is physically ...
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2answers
383 views

Does the measured mass of earth include that of the atmosphere?

Just what the title states please... and perhaps naive too... Wikipedia pegs the mass of our Earth at 5.9722 × 10^24 kg. Does this figure include the mass of the Atmosphere?
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3answers
132 views

How can the Lorentz transformation cause two objects' masses to both increase?

Suppose there are two people A and B. A is standing on the earth and B is on a rocket in space. Now B passes by the earth at a speed of 0.9c and A sees him. According to A, B's mass would have ...
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2answers
110 views

Increase in Mass with Velocity [duplicate]

I just had a confusion. Does the mass of the body actually increase when it is moving with a certain velocity? Or does it only look like the mass has increase to another observer. How can the actual ...
2
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2answers
346 views

If nothing weighs something then doesn't that mean there is mass associated with spacetime?

Lawrence M. Krauss says, "If you removed all of the particles, all of the radiation,absolutely everything from space and all that remained was nothing that nothing would weigh something." What ...
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1answer
99 views

What is the difference between baryonic and gravitational mass?

I was reading a webpage on neutron stars, and it mentioned that a neutron star's gravitational mass is about 20% lower than its baryonic mass due to gravitational redshift. I understand the basics of ...
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1answer
101 views

Since when the term 'mass' is being used in physics?

I was wondering who used the term 'mass' in physics and in what context? The Online Etymology Dictionary says it is in use since 1704. According to the Wiki article the year is contemporary to the ...
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2answers
4k views

Does a scale measure weight or mass? [closed]

What does a measuring scale measure: mass or weight? I mean, when we stand on a weighing scale the reading we get is in $\mathrm{kg}$'s. What does this mean?
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1answer
159 views

Doubts about the definition of mass

I'm having some problems understanding what are the possible definitons of mass and how they are related to each other. In Classical Mechanics, we can distinguish between inertial and gravitational ...
2
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1answer
175 views

The role of dark matter in black holes and star formation

In my understanding, there exists a critical mass for which a star needs to be in order for it to collapse into a black hole. This also applies to a certain critical density of gas in order for stars ...
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2answers
1k views

Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
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2answers
955 views

How could something have negative mass?

With all the theories on how Neutrinos apparently broke the light barrier, there was one theory someone told me of how neutrinos might have less than zero mass, but she didn't explain how this was ...
2
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1answer
175 views

Motion is relative, right? And most pop sci relativity explanations are somewhat incorrect?

On page 20 of A Brief History of Time: . . . all observers should measure the same speed of light, no matter how fast they are moving. But in an observer's frame of reference, they're actually ...
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1answer
93 views

Majorana mass vs Dirac Mass

Why is it said that the Dirac mass term conserves the fermion number but the Majorana mass term does not? Can someone explain this mathematically? Which breakdown of symmetry is responsible for ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Neutrino mass and energy question

If a neutrino has mass then it travels less than the speed of light. Suppose I boost myself to the rest frame; i.e. bring it to rest in the laboratory. Now if it oscillates between different states ...
2
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2answers
142 views

How is it possible to move something without completely lifting it?

For example, let's assume a chair here: It can be "slid" across the force if we use minimal upwards force, but not enough to actually "lift" the chair. Why should it move? Here's a better example: I ...
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2answers
181 views

Barbells and gravity

A giant set of bar bells floating in space (like two identical sized planets connected by a long rod) would have a centre of mass midway between the two on the connecting rod. But surely it would ...
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2answers
918 views

Does inertia increase with speed?

I have heard that when the speed of the object increase, the mass of the object also increase. (Why does an object with higher speed gain more (relativistic) mass?) So inertia which is related to ...
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2answers
104 views

Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely?

As the title suggests, Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely? I am aware any mass produces and effects gravity but couldn't find ...
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1answer
143 views

Law of conservation of matter

If scientist have made small particles of matter then why do we still haw the law of conservation of matter? Is it because the few particles don't make a noticeable difference in our life?
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2answers
326 views

Do photons actually generate a slight kinetic force?

My question is even though photons have no (rest) mass, do they emit a external force due to EM radiation causing electrons to be excited and jump to higher energy shells which electrons have mass ...
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2answers
78 views

Is it part of special relativity that mass possessing energy is more dense?

I was reading http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/hillis/hillis_p2.html and it says that a charged battery weighs more than a dead one or a rotating object weighs more than a stationary one (i.e. mass ...
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1answer
144 views

Glueball mass in non-abelian Yang Mills theory

How can the glueball mass be calculated in Yang Mills theory?
2
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1answer
2k views

Transforming a sound wave into a literal light wave. Is it possible?

Literally transforming sound into an actual light wave seems almost impossible. But transforming the sound wave into a light wave while containing a single mass? I know that sound can contain a mass ...
2
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2answers
195 views

Which new insight did $E=mc^2$ give us?

I had a special relativity course at university. Now I'm trying to extract what new insight $E=mc^2$ did give us. I mean that moving mass has/is energy (kinetic) not new. The energy merely changed ...
2
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1answer
319 views

Does magnetised material lose weight?

I've had argument on a forum about this. People think, that: if the same object is magnetised, it has less energy. so by $E = mc^2$ it weighs less than an object that is not magnetised (hence spin of ...
2
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1answer
35 views

Mass scales in See-saw mechenism

Are both types of Majorana masses $$\mathcal{L}^L_M=-\frac{m_L}{2}[\overline{(\psi_L)^c}\psi_L + \overline{\psi_L}(\psi_L)^c]$$ and $$\mathcal{L}^R_M=-\frac{m_R}{2}[\overline{(\psi_R)^c}\psi_R + ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Confusion about Dirac mass term

In chiral basis, $\psi=\begin{pmatrix} \psi_L\\ \psi_R \end{pmatrix}$ and therefore, $\overline\psi=\psi^\dagger\gamma^0=\begin{pmatrix} \psi^\dagger_L & \psi^\dagger_R ...
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1answer
69 views

If we were able to double the mass of the ordinary matter in the universe it will recollapse?

What will happen if we suppose to be able to add mass at the universe? For example doubling the mass of the ordinary matter?
2
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1answer
56 views

What is the center of Earth's landmass?

I have read, several times, that the Great Pyramid is located at "the center of Earth's landmass". How do we define "Earth's landmass"? And once defined, how do we find the center of it?
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2answers
98 views

When “weight” of an object is listed, is it really the mass or the weight?

I Have read an earlier post regarding this, but the answer wasn't perfect enough or I didn't understand so! Let me put it to clear, I know difference between weight and mass. Also I know the ...
2
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1answer
146 views

Why is Planck mass much larger than the smallest mass that we actually know about?

The three fundamental constants $h$, $c$ and $G$ are manipulated and rearranged in different ways to get the Planck time, Planck mass etc. The Planck time is said to be the smallest time possible and ...
2
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1answer
135 views

Fine-Tuning, the Hiearchy Problem, and Mass in the Standard Model

In Chapter 1 of his book String Theory in a Nutshell, Kiritsis states the following. The [Standard M]odel is unstable as we increase the energy (hierarchy problem of mass scales) and the theory ...
2
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2answers
283 views

Determination of mass density distribution of an object

This is a follow-up to a previous question How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?. My purpose is not to restart the flurry of more or less humorous jokes (which are not such a bad thing ...
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1answer
94 views

Sitting on the bob of a pendulum

Walter Lewin's best performance was the pendulum demonstration, and I copy the transcript now: Would the period come out to be the same or not? [students respond] Some of you think it's ...
2
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4answers
297 views

The building blocks of energy

I have a couple of related questions that have been bothering me for a while. They might sound unscientific, but here is goes: What are the building blocks of energy? What does energy consist of? Is ...
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1answer
229 views

Neutrino mass with Dirac and Majorana

Why both Dirac mass and Majorana mass terms are needed to explain the mass of a neutrino?
2
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5answers
2k views

Why Gravity attracts all objects with the same speed?

Why Gravity attracts all objects with the same speed? Is this question was solved? What is the exact answer?
2
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1answer
145 views

Can non-free forces change the rest mass?

While reading Hobsen et al.'s "General Relativity: An Introduction for Physicists", I came across a bit confusing derivation. Multiplying the 4-force and 4-velocity, the following derivation can be ...
2
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2answers
151 views

Inertial Mass of a scalar field

Does it make sense to talk of the inertial mass of a scalar field? By the equivalence principle, it must be equal to its gravitational mass. We know that the scalar field contributes towards the ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Linearized mass conservation equation

I'm working on global seismology and I'm currently facing troubles understanding how an equation is obtained. The equation concerned is the following one : $$ \rho^{E1} = -\nabla \cdot ...
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2answers
80 views

Break speed of light with infinite mass

I've heard that a spacecraft could never exceed the speed of light because it's (relativistic) mass quickly approaches infinity and therefore there could never create a big enough rocket to propel it ...
2
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1answer
37 views

Non-vanishing commutator of potential and mass matrices for Majorana fermions interaction theory

Consider 2 different Majorana fermions $\Psi_{L}, \Psi_{R}$ (physically, neutrinos). In general case I can write the massive part of lagrangian of these fermions in the form $$ L_{m} = (\bar ...