The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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Calculate stainless steel pole necking limit

Background Trying to determine how much weight a post can support without necking when a monitor is attached to an articulated arm: a cantilever problem. Problem There are three objects involved in ...
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Origin of quark masses

Does all the mass of the quarks in the standard model come from the Higgs sector or is there also a contribution to quark masses due to QCD chiral symmetry breaking?
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Why do the $1/2$ factor appear in the Majorana mass Lagrangian?

In case of Dirac neutrino there is no $1/2$ factor in the mass Lagrangian but for Majorana type neutrino there is a half factor in the mass Lagrangian.
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639 views

Why doesn't a wall move when you push it if there's space behind it?

In the first screen you can see that if a person were to push a wall within a typical household the wall would not move while keeping themselves tractioned to the floor. If you push hard and do not ...
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592 views

What the heck is negative effective mass?

I am reading this book:Solid State Electronic Devices by Ben G Streetman and Sanjay Kumar Banerjee. I have some doubts in the article 3.2.2 Effective mass. In this the aythors say that ...
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164 views

Effective mass of a black hole?

Suppose a black hole forms from a given mass of particles such as the core of a star going supernova. The black hole formed will have an effective mass due to the curvature of space time induced. Such ...
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324 views

Understanding the different kinds of mass in gravity

On this site, the Phys.SE question Is there a fundamental reason why gravitational mass is the same as inertial mass? has been asked. See also this Phys.SE question. The 'answer' provided on this ...
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Does the Chandrasekhar Limit scale for a Black Hole?

No physicist/astrophysicist I; All I know about the Chandrasekhar limit is that it apparently limits the mass a star may survive, beyond which it degenerates to a neutron star, or a black-hole. Does ...
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Planck mass is about the mass of one eyebrow hair

Unlike most Planck units named after "Planck" such as Planck length, Planck temperature, etc, the Planck mass seems more closed to daily life. It is about $10^{-5}$g, same order of magnitude of one ...
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Classic mass predictions from Left-Right models with discrete symmetries?

I am covering the classic literature on predictions of Cabibbo angle or other relationships in the mass matrix. As you may remember, this research was a rage in the late seventies, after noticing that ...
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Is there a finite amount of mass in the universe? [duplicate]

So, I'm not too physics savvy but I am curious to ask. Is there a finite amount of mass in the universe? or is there more and more being created from somewhere or something? If the universe is ...
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Does the (relativistic) mass change? Why?

I learned recently that when an object moves with a velocity comparable to the velocity of light the (relativistic) mass changes. How does this alteration take place?
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Is there a connection between gluons and photons?

I was wondering if there is any sort of connection between a gluon and a photon since they are both considered massless.
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What is difference between Inertial mass and gravitational mass [duplicate]

I recently read that the mass we deal with in Equation $F=Ma$ is called inertial mass and the mass we deal with in $F=Mg$ is gravitational mass. Suppose I am taking a same ball in a free fall and in ...
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347 views

Do photons have mass? [duplicate]

As a student in a highschool physics class, my teacher has repeatedly told me that photons are massless. Yet, I have also heard from other sources that photons have momentum. If photons were to have ...
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758 views

Why does the Standard Model predict Neutrinos are massless?

Why are neutrinos massless in the Standard Model? Is it connected with experimental fact that neutrinos always have only one direction of projection of spin on motion direction?
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Is a spinning object heavier than a non-spinning object?

Does spinning an object make it heavier? A real-world example: I was mowing the lawn in front of my house, a lawn that tends to have some steep inclines. I realized that the lawn-mower was easier ...
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135 views

Can the mass of a body change under any condition or not? [closed]

We know that mass can neither be changed nor be destroyed, but I want to know if there is any circumstance under which the mass of a body can be changed?
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408 views

How quickly does gravity extend from created mass? [duplicate]

I apologize in advance if this is a stupid or off-topic question. Since Energy can be converted into matter according to $E=mc^2$, how fast does it take for the gravity of that new matter to extend ...
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161 views

Do massless particles follow the curved spacetime or not?

I am assuming that zero (rest) mass particles don't interact gravitationally with each other and other particles. Does that mean they experience a "flat" spacetime instead of a curved one? I find it a ...
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Is it possible to calculate weight of person with sensors found in today's smartphone?

Is it possible to calculate the weight of a person by only using his smartphone, some action he must perform (jump, rotate etc.) and some data like his height or age. Current smartphones have the ...
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481 views

Why are particles different sizes?

Is it correct in saying that a particles size is it's rest energy, and that particles don't actually have size (in the way you get different size objects)? What defines what sizes a particle can be? ...
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658 views

What does “nearly infinite mass” mean?

I am sure this is a silly question, but I was reading something that described the pre big-bang universe as having "nearly infinite mass." How can something be "nearly" infinite? The term seems to ...
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399 views

If a photon has no mass, how can it be attracted by the Sun?

I read that the photon doesn't have mass, but my teacher says that the photon has mass because the sun can attract it (like in the experiments to prove the theory of relativity). I think that there ...
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Why should mass be attractive in nature?

Why does a mass attract all the masses around it? Why should't it repel or just stay calm? Why should it be like that?
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Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
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Do we say that phonon has effective mass through its dispersion relation?

The effective mass is proportional to the second derivative of the dispersion relation d2k/dE2. Do we say that phonon have effective mass through it ? Spin wave have.
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Does a toy top weigh less when it is spinning?

I am under the understanding that a toy top will weigh less when it is spinning. The Russians made a spinning type transport back in the 70s to lessen its payload over the tundra. Is this an effective ...
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How to find the center of mass of several objects in a 2d plane?

We have the following scenario in a 2d plane: a big rectangle with a lot of smaller similar uniform rectangles in it, all of them weight differently. Where is the center of mass of this object ...
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353 views

Does string theory pose a photon mass problem?

A few weeks ago, I started reading books on string theory. One thing that really seemed confusing or contradictory was that string theory explains that the energy of a superstring gives mass to the ...
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Orbital speed for a circular orbit?

I wanted to look up the formula for orbital speed for a circular orbit on Wikipedia, and I found 2 formulas: All bounded orbits where the gravity of a central body dominates are elliptical in ...
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239 views

Photon mass and life time

In this article, the author tried to explain that, Einstein's theory may not valid because he says "photon can decay because it may have minute amount of mass". I'm totally in a conundrum state that ...
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193 views

Strings and their masses

How do strings present in particles give mass to them? Is it only by vibrating? I have been trying to find the answer but could not find it anywhere, can this question be answered?
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553 views

Have negative pressures any physical meaning?

Some cubic thermodynamical equations of state predict negative pressures, have negative pressures any physical meaning? Could they be related to negative mass?
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All matter has a mass but does all matter have a gravitational pull?

I know that all planets and stars have a gravitational pull but does a simple much smaller object have a gravitational pull for example a pebble?
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What would be the photon's effective mass in Newton's Law of Gravitation?

If we equalize the force from the Newton's Law of Gravitation to Force on a photon in a gravitional field (I don't know if there is an equation for it). What would be the photon's effective mass? (I ...
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166 views

Why is the Earth's moon so big?

It could just be me, but it seems like our Moon is WAY bigger than it should be for a planet of our size. If you look at satellite-to-planet mass ratios for the largest moons of Jupiter, Saturn, ...
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Glashow-Weinberg-Salam mass terms

At the end of spontaneous symmetry breaking I get these mass terms: $$W_{\mu}^{\pm}=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\bigl(W_{\mu}^{1} \mp i W_{\mu}^{2} \bigr )$$ $$\mathcal{L}_{mass}=\frac{1}{2} g^2 \frac{v^2}{4} ...
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Electromagnetic factors affecting inertial mass of a body affect its gravitational mass or not?

We can see that when a charge sphere is at rest & we are to put it in motion with any desired velocity than we will have to apply the same force for a longer time as if it were applied to the ...
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How can we get the mass of an uncharged proton?

How can we get the mass of an uncharged proton, i.e. how varies the mass of the charged proton if i remove the electric charge? For the isotopic spin theory neutron and proton have the same mass and ...
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174 views

What is the difference between baryonic and gravitational mass?

I was reading a webpage on neutron stars, and it mentioned that a neutron star's gravitational mass is about 20% lower than its baryonic mass due to gravitational redshift. I understand the basics of ...
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181 views

Doubts about the definition of mass

I'm having some problems understanding what are the possible definitons of mass and how they are related to each other. In Classical Mechanics, we can distinguish between inertial and gravitational ...
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848 views

What bends fabric of space-time?

I know that mass can bend fabric of space-time, which causes gravity by making an object curve around a planet or star but is there anything else that can bend it? Other energy sources, forces ...
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367 views

Dropping cubes of same masses but different sizes?

Two cubes of the same mass but different sizes (smaller Cube A and bigger Cube B) are dropped from same height on to a tray of sand.Which cube will create a deeper impression and why?
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Mass of particle near light speed in a medium

I am trying to get a common understanding from these two previous questions: Why does the mass of an object increase when its speed approaches that of light? What happens if light/particles exceeded ...
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Mass and Energy

Would the mass of burnt firewood be equal to the mass of firewood before burning? Then where does that heat come from? According to Einstein's equation, $E=mc^2$ Shouldn't there be some mass going ...
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178 views

How can you accurately determine your own mass?

I'm trying to figure out whether it is possible for an individual to accurately determine his/her own mass, to within 100g, using equipment that is readily accessible or can be purchased at a ...
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1answer
194 views

How much weight can a person carry to avoid being blown over by wind?

I wonder if there is a certain amount of weight that I could carry in a rolling bag to help prevent me from being knocked over by the wind. I have balance problems and some lack of muscle strength in ...
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1answer
272 views

Why is Planck mass much larger than the smallest mass that we actually know about?

The three fundamental constants $h$, $c$ and $G$ are manipulated and rearranged in different ways to get the Planck time, Planck mass etc. The Planck time is said to be the smallest time possible and ...
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170 views

Gravitational distortion of an object's diameter, at a distance,

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are? What is the relationship between the optical distortion and the mass of the objects?