The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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Why are there 3 quarks in a proton? [closed]

A few quark related questions (I don't know much about them other than that there are 2 flavors concerning protons and neutrons). Why are there 3 quarks in a proton or neutron? Why not 2 or 4? Is ...
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Is most of the matter in the observable universe within galaxies?

Do we know, either through observations or through theory driven computer simulations, the location of the majority of the visible matter in the observable universe? That is, is it located within ...
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Majorana mass vs Dirac Mass

Why is it said that the Dirac mass term conserves the fermion number but the Majorana mass term does not? Can someone explain this mathematically? Which breakdown of symmetry is responsible for ...
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Mass gap for photons

I am puzzled by the answers to the question: What is a mass gap? There, Ron Maimon's answer gives a clear-cut definition, which I suppose applies to any quantum field theory with Hamiltonian $H$, ...
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191 views

Why must inertial mass and gravitational mass be equal, not just proportional?

I'm certain I'm just under a grave misapprehension. I really just don't understand how one can conclude that inertial mass is equal to gravitational mass. It seems to me that we've simply scaled our ...
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369 views

Relation of Higgs couplings to masses of fundamental particles

The standard model has 12 massive leptons and 2 massive bosons other than the Higgs. My understanding of the Higgs mechanism is at about the level of this article, which goes as follows. Start with ...
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709 views

Mechanisms of mass generation for Dirac neutrinos

If neutrinos are Majorana particles, one way of explaining their small masses is the seesaw mechanism. Now say I'd like my neutrinos to be Dirac, for symmetry to the quark sector. What mechanisms ...
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879 views

Is it possible to have a singularity with zero mass?

A singularity, by the definition I know, is a point in space with infinite of a property such as density. Density is Mass/Volume. Since the volume of a singularity is 0, then the density will thus ...
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Impulse from absorbing a photon? Is there an increase in rest mass?

I'm going through A P French's special relativity. In one chapter (6) the following is set up: Suppose that a stationary particle of mass $M_0$ is struck by a photon of energy $Q$, which is ...
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Mass corrections to fermions proportional to the mass?

In this post regarding quantum corrections to a massless fermion field, the answerer stated that quantum corrections to the mass will always be proportional to the mass (at least in QED). This point ...
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Why doesn't a wall move when you push it if there's space behind it?

In the first screen you can see that if a person were to push a wall within a typical household the wall would not move while keeping themselves tractioned to the floor. If you push hard and do not ...
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Higgs boson mass and electroweak energy scale

Is it a coincidence that the mass of the Higgs boson is exactly half the electroweak energy scale?
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Little confusion with see-saw mechanism

Neutinos are either Dirac particles or Majorana particles but can’t be both at the same time. Then how can we write a general mass term as the sum of a Dirac mass term and a Majorana mass term? When ...
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How do astronauts measure weight/mass on other planets? [closed]

At the start of The Martian movie the astronauts collect samples, targeting for "100 grams". Hence the question ... what units do astronauts actually use? I did some quick google search but all I get ...
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Does the (relativistic) mass change? Why?

I learned recently that when an object moves with a velocity comparable to the velocity of light the (relativistic) mass changes. How does this alteration take place?
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Quarks in a hadron- where does the mass come from

We know that the sum of the masses of the quarks in a proton is approximately $9.4^{+1.9}_{-1.3}~\text{MeV}/c^2$, whereas the mass of a proton is $\approx931~\text{MeV}/c^2$. This extra mass is ...
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Is my interpretation of how a gravitational wave is formed correct?

I'm sure many here are familiar with the following image showing the 2D representation of how the fabric of spacetime is warped by the presence of mass:- Can this fabric be interpreted as an ...
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Is a block of cotton heavier than a block of iron?

if i have a block of cotton and a block of iron each containing a weight of 100 kg when measured on a weighing machine, in reality which one is heaver than the other, which one is heavier and why? ...
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Why does the Standard Model predict Neutrinos are massless?

Why are neutrinos massless in the Standard Model? Is it connected with experimental fact that neutrinos always have only one direction of projection of spin on motion direction?
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Is $E=mc^2$ false?

Recently, I found a YouTube video saying that $$E=mc^2$$ is false. It says that the real one is $$ E^2=m^2 c^4 + p^2 c^2 $$ where $E$: energy, $m$: mass, $c$: speed of light and $p$: momentum. Is ...
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Nobel Prize 2013: What is it about? [closed]

I would really like to understand Higgs-Englert’s discovery that earned them the 2013 physics Nobel prize. I tried reading their work, but understood nothing of it unfortunately. The reason why I’m ...
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What is the mass of a wave?

The slide called "QUANTA" here says that "One Quantum has a definite mass" and the picture shows a wave. So, What is meant by the mass of a wave?
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Is the $\nu_e$ massive?

Neutrino oscillations imply that the $\nu_\tau$ is more massive than the $\nu_\mu$, and the $\nu_\mu$ is more massive than the $\nu_e$, so it's inferred that the $\nu_\mu$ and $\nu_\tau$ have mass. ...
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Can a mass matrix be asymmetric?

I am developing a mathematical model of a mechanical device consisting basically of coupled harmonic oscillators. It turns out that the system mass matrix is asymmetric. I seem to read somewhere that ...
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Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
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Could we prove that neutrinos have mass by measuring their gravitational signature?

It is now said that neutrinos have mass. If an object has mass then it also emits a gravitational field. I appreciate the neutrinos mass is predicted to be small, but as there are so many produced ...
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What's the distance between the center of mass and geometrical center of Earth? [closed]

With a good approach we can say that they are identical. But how accurate is this approach? Since Earth is not homogeneous there must be (can be) some difference. In other words I'm asking if Earth ...
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Which is the lightest thing in this universe? Is that a photon or neutrino?

I hear a lot of people saying that neutrino is the lightest subatomic particle but according to me a photon must be the lightest as nothing can travel faster than light because it gets heavier and ...
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Planetary Gravity and its effects

This is my first question on the Physics portion of Stack Exchange. I was hoping to get some light on the topic of gravity. I don't have much background knowledge of physics so I might as well start ...
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What is Energy made of?

We have the famous equation $E = mc^2$, and we also believe that matter is made of particles. Then, What is the energy made of? If the two are interchangeable, there must be some common building ...
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Does the recent re-count of stars in elliptical gallaxies affect our understanding of the universal mass balance?

I've seen several popular reports of a new count of low-mass stars in elliptical galaxies (here's one). Edit: Pursuant to several correct comments I've changed the title to agree with the actual ...
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337 views

Where does a hadrons mass come from [duplicate]

So I've come to the understanding that a hadrons mass does not come from the constituent quarks but instead comes from a combination of things like binding energy and the mass energy of virtual gluons ...
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377 views

Does relativistic mass exhibit gravitiational effects?

Groundhog Day Update, 2014 The simple and dumb way to ask my main question is this: If something like a neutron start goes sailing by at very close to the speed of light, say fast enough to double ...
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All matter has a mass but does all matter have a gravitational pull?

I know that all planets and stars have a gravitational pull but does a simple much smaller object have a gravitational pull for example a pebble?
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bound states of massless fields?

Question: are they mathematically possible at all? physically? with finite mass systems, usually the binding energy contributes to the rest-mass of the system. It would seem that even if you could ...
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Question about Neutrino Flavor and Mass Eigenstates

I know the flavor and mass eigenstates are different, but are they related? What I mean is, in a process like fusion where electron neutrinos are created, do they start in the 1 mass eigenstate? My ...
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Why do some particles have a greater mass than others?

The property of mass that almost every particle possesses comes from the Higgs Field. It is this field, which permeates all of space, that particles interact with and hence obtain mass. But why do ...
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What is the mass distribution within the sun?

Jupiter is roughly 1/1000 the total mass of the sun. To get some idea of what effect Jupiter's gravity may have on the sun I'd like to know the approximate mass distribution of the sun. (i.e) the ...
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523 views

Neutrino mass with Dirac and Majorana

Why both Dirac mass and Majorana mass terms are needed to explain the mass of a neutrino?
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433 views

Is this static mechanical balance possible without trickery?

On damnlol.com, I came across this picture: http://www.damnlol.com/hello-god-i-have-a-fault-to-report-7549.html My question is: Is this possible without glue? If not are there similar situations ...
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287 views

Topological Mass Generation Mechanism

What is the topological mass generation mechanism? And what is its relation with the Higgs mechanism? Can we say that after the discovery of Higgs boson, the topological mass generation mechanism ...
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Reduced mass in quantum physics (Hydrogen Atom)

I've gone through an intermediate classical mechanics course, and in solving the two-body problem, we reduce it to a one-body between a larger stationary mass, and a smaller reduced mass. Most ...
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First and Second Moment of Mass

I recently came across the definition of the Center of Mass of a system as the point about which the first moment of mass is zero. Further, it defined Moment of Inertia as the second moment of mass. ...
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Matter waves - DeBroglie's relations

I am currently studying from Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers by Taylor et al. They derive the DeBroglie relation $p=h/\lambda$ from setting mass $m=0$ in the energy-momentum relation ...
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If quarks didn't have mass, could protons (and neutrons) exist?

I read here (mass of a proton) that the mass of a proton is mostly (99%) due to the energy of the strong nuclear force which binds the quarks together, and not the actual mass of the quarks. My ...
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Do all the particles acquire mass in the Standard Model due to the Higgs mechanism only?

I know that a mass term for an intermediate boson is not compatible with the gauge symmetry. But in principle a mass term for the electron field does not violate a gauge symmetry. However to build an ...
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Zero $g$ in a black hole?

At the very centre of the Earth, masses cancel each other out, creating an effective zero-$g$ environment. Would the same happen in a black hole?
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Why is effective mass of holes positive?

i am trying to understand this. I know that the effective mass of electrons or holes is calculated as: $$m^* = \frac{h^2}{(4\pi^2)\frac{d^2E}{dk^2}}$$ Now,if i look at this plot for example: I ...
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Speed of light, lasers and mass

Hopefully this isn't a bad question. Light travels at the speed it does and nothing else can travel that fast because things have mass, correct? Or at least correct on an elementary level. And if ...
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How do gravitons transmit gravity to occulted bodies?

If matter feels gravitation by way of absorbing gravitons, how is it that gravity passes through matter unfettered? For instance during a solar eclipse; shouldn't the moon block at least some of the ...