The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
0answers
38 views

Sudbery's Quantum Mechanics and the Particles of Nature, Chapter 1, Problem 2: Calculate the mass of the electron [closed]

I'm currently working on the problems for Chapter 1 of Quantum Mechanics and the Particles of Nature: An outline for mathematicians by Anthony Sudbery (Cambridge University Press, 1986; reprinted ...
1
vote
5answers
311 views

Why is the definition of mass and matter interlinked?

In my textbook the definition of matter and mass are: Matter: Any thing that occupies space and has mass . Mass: The amount of matter contained in a body. While defining "matter" we refer to ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

If mass increases as velocity increases, does gravity increase as well? [duplicate]

The way I understand it, velocity and mass are tied together with relativity. As I increase in velocity, I increase my mass until my mass is so great that it would take more energy than the entire ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Is it possible to have a black hole in empty space?

If the escape velocity of two very massive objects is near the speed of light, and those objects are orbiting each other (let's ignore the Roche limit for this exercise), is it possible that the ...
17
votes
5answers
9k views

Why don’t photons interact with the Higgs field?

Why don’t photons interact with the Higgs field and hence remain massless?
1
vote
3answers
81 views

What are the six quark mass values when extrapolated to Planck energy?

Let us assume that the standard model is correct up to Planck mass. (Yes, I know, this is a big assumption.) If we continue the running of quark masses with energy (due to renormalization), what are ...
-1
votes
4answers
108 views

What is mass constituted by quarks in a proton?

In a question I read Quarks in a hadron- where does the mass come from "The sum of the masses of the quarks in a proton is approximately $30~\text{MeV}/c^2$, whereas the mass of a proton is ...
5
votes
2answers
833 views

Quarks in a hadron- where does the mass come from

We know that the sum of the masses of the quarks in a proton is approximately $9.4^{+1.9}_{-1.3}~\text{MeV}/c^2$, whereas the mass of a proton is $\approx931~\text{MeV}/c^2$. This extra mass is ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Applications on Newtons' laws [closed]

A light string passes over a smooth pulley and carries at one of its ends a body of mass 90 grams and it carries a body of mass 50 grams at its other end.the system started its motion from rest when ...
1
vote
2answers
113 views

Does light have mass? [closed]

Does light have mass? If yes, will it exert force? If no, then how are light particles are travelling at light speed? If light doesn't have mass how is it attracted by gravitational force (black ...
1
vote
4answers
104 views

Where does the energy lost due to light emission come from?

If an object lose energy when it emits light, does that energy come from the mass of the object? Examples: Does a flashlight lose mass when it's turned on? Does a regular object (like a pencil or a ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Is my mass relative?

Mass is said to be a source of gravity (I think:p), but if I were to travel into space. Would it change with respect to someone on earth? Since the gravity changes in space, but does it affect the ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

How does an Atoms electric field overcome an electrons inertia?

An electron has mass, and therefore has inertia. How does an atoms electric field perpetually overcome an electrons inertia, necessary to hold it in its shell? Does this require continual work to be ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views
5
votes
1answer
600 views

Why is effective mass of holes positive?

i am trying to understand this. I know that the effective mass of electrons or holes is calculated as: $$m^* = \frac{h^2}{(4\pi^2)\frac{d^2E}{dk^2}}$$ Now,if i look at this plot for example: I ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Can absolute speed be determined by an object's mass?

It's been said that nobody can actually know how fast the Earth is moving through space, because a reference point is needed to determine absolute velocity. But if mass increases as speed increases, ...
4
votes
0answers
43 views

A problem with ADM mass in the derivation of 1st law of black hole thermodynamics

The definition of ADM mass is $$M=\frac{1}{16\pi}\lim_{r\rightarrow\infty}\int \left(\frac{\partial h_{\mu\nu}}{\partial x^\mu}-\frac{\partial h_{\mu\mu}}{\partial x^\nu} \right)N^\nu dA$$ according ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

A question about the Dirac mass and Majorana mass

I am sorry if my question seems to be naive. For the free Dirac field, the Lagrangian is $$\mathcal{L}=\bar{\psi}(i\gamma^{\mu}\partial_{\mu}-m_D)\psi$$ or expressed in the Weyl spinor, the mass term ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

The relativity of gravity: If mass is relative how much gravity do I experience?

Now let's say the I am on a spaceship. The spaceship is not accelerating, i.e., it is not firing its rockets. Most of the ship's mass is in the back of the ship. Let's say it is moving arbitrarily ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

W and Z boson masses' running neglected?

Since the Lagrangian mass term of $W$ boson involves the bare coupling $g$, it cannot be the measured mass. Then the measured mass will "run" with momentum transferred. But everywhere I look the ...
4
votes
1answer
65 views

In GR what is a “source-frame mass”?

In the recent LIGO paper, "GW150914: First results from the search for binary black hole coalescence with Advanced LIGO, (LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration)", they refer to the ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Bondi mass aspect

I'm looking for a good reference that defines the Bondi mass aspect and his relations to Bondi and ADM mass. Googling a bit I've not founded any satisfactory exposition of the subject. A short ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

How can individual photons have different amounts of energy?

If photon is an elementary particle, how can different photons have different energy, if $E=mc^2$ and all photons have (or don't have) the same mass and the speed of photon is constant shouldn't it ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

2 airplanes same size and shap different mass

2 identical balls of different mass dropped from same height reach the ground at the same time due to the acceleration of gravity being constant. If I understand correctly the ball with more mass ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Weight of mass falling through liquid

If I place a container of fluid on a scale and drop a non-buoyant mass into the fluid, will the scale read less as long as the mass is in motion downward as compared to when the mass is at rest on ...
2
votes
2answers
77 views

Mass, velocity and inertia [closed]

If 5 ozs of weight is my engine, and this weight starts in the back of a four wheeled vehicle traveling down a decline gaining speed due to the engine mass to allow its inertia to carry it across a ...
-1
votes
2answers
125 views

What is my real weight? [duplicate]

My weighting machines notes my weight to be 65. Should I read it 65N or 65kg. PS: I only need a correct comment. This question is different, since, I know very clearly what mass and weight are. But ...
0
votes
3answers
65 views

Conditions for the tension to vary in the rope

What are the conditions for the tension to vary in the rope. I have read below conditions 1. rope has to have some mass 2. rope is accelerating I get the 1st ...
0
votes
0answers
81 views

Is there anything that has mass but no charge?

Is there anything that has mass but no charge? I am of course aware of neutrons, but since these have internal structure and only a net non-zero charge, they will have a non-trivial electric field ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Does the shape of a containter affect the apparent mass of liquid inside it when measured by a scale? [duplicate]

For both containers it is true that: $p_{bottom}=p_{atm}+\rho gh$ and $F_{bottom}=a*p_{bottom} \iff F_{bottom}=a*p_{atm} + a\rho gh$ I do not know how a scale functions, but I guess that the only ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

Mass of a point charge [closed]

A point charge is defined as an electric charge at a mathematical point with no dimensions(Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_particle#Point_charge). Can anything be said about its mass in ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Doubts About Force and Inertia!

But then what does inertia mean at all!? Cant we calculate how much it resists the applied force? I mean considering an imaginary plane with no friction but gravity as of Earth and an enormous mass of ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Do we feel 0.4% less body weight on mount everest?

Weight of the object at surface of earth(where $g=9.8066$). considering Weight=$100~\rm kg$ ,Weight ($W_1$)=$mg$ , mass=$10.1972~\rm kg$ At mount Everest top: Height of Mount Everest = $8.848\rm ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Balancing Utensils: Center of Mass

If you have a cork piece on top of a nail, it is extremely hard to keep it stable, and the slightest action will make the cork fall off. However, when you balance it on top of a nail but put forks ...
3
votes
1answer
460 views

How can the Schwarzschild radius of the universe be 13.7 billion light years?

So i was reading about Schwarzschild radius on Wiki and I found a interesting thing written there link. It says that the S. radius of the universe is as big as the size of the universe? How is ...
1
vote
3answers
234 views

Inertia on relativistic mass when particle is near speed of light

Inertia is directly proportional to mass but what happens when something travel to speed near to light. Its relativistic mass tends to infinity but that is false mass so I want to know if inertia is ...
-1
votes
2answers
81 views

Why is the mass of neutrino expressed in electronvolts?

The definition of electronvolt (eV) from wiki is In physics, the electronvolt (symbol eV; also written electron volt) is a unit of energy equal to approximately 160 zeptojoules (symbol zJ) or ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

Relation between Newtons and Kilograms

Work is expressed as $W=Fd$, where the $F$ is in Newton, $d$ is in meters and result $W$ is in Joules. For example, if I take $1N$ on earth and lift it $1m$ up in the air I have done $1J$ of work. ...
1
vote
4answers
104 views

if mass is dependent on velocity, and velocity is relative, how can we determine rest mass [closed]

If I'm not mistaken, $m=\gamma*m_0$ ($\gamma$ being the lorentz transformation) But $\gamma$ depends on velocity. How do we determine velocity if velocity is relative? If we are currently being flung ...
16
votes
3answers
1k views

What is “mass” in particle physics? [duplicate]

It's clear, from reading pop-science articles about the Higgs boson, that particle physicists have something very specific in mind when they say "mass". In classical physics the mass of a particle is ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Is this equation for the rotational weight of a half disk correct? [closed]

I need to know what rotational force the weight of this disk applies to the axle. I'm not sure what the units are, whether it's torque or something else I'm looking for. The weight of the disk is ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

first and second moments of mass

why is the second moment of mass used as moment of inertia, and why is the first moment of mass about an axis not used as moment of inertia? i understand that first moment is product of mass and its ...
3
votes
1answer
52 views

Why is the top quark mass reconstructed too high when the bottom quarks were swapped (semileptonic decay of a ttbar pair)?

I use a dataset containing simulated events of semileptonic $t\bar{t}$ decays ($t\bar{t} \rightarrow W⁺b W⁻ \bar{b} \rightarrow q\bar{q}bl\nu_l\bar{b}$) at CMS, LHC. For each event, the four-momenta ...
20
votes
4answers
5k views

What's the difference between centre of mass & centre of gravity for massive bodies?

My book says: For most of the small objects, both are same. But for mammoth ones, they are really different ones. And in a gravity-less environment, COG is absent; COM still exists. Ok, what's ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

How do I calculate the moment of inertia with velocity? [closed]

How do I calculate a total moment of inertia when I have point mass with velocity? It looks like this: If I understand correctly, firstly I have to find a center of mass. What do I do next?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

If a spaceship were to be able to travel at light speed, would it pass through objects undamaged? Would it damage/destroy objects?

We know, not just by scientific theory, but by practice (I have seen it with my own eyes), that an increase in velocity increases the mass of the given object proportionally. One day visiting a ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

Why does mass attract? [duplicate]

Question stands as title says: Do we know (straight probable is reasoning is meant by "knowing") why mass is doing so?
-3
votes
3answers
109 views

Is mass directly or inversely proportional to time? [closed]

From a Newtonian perspective: F = ma F dx = ma dx E = m (dv/dt) dx m = (E dt) / (dv dx) Mass is directly proportional to time, if time slows down then mass goes down or decreases. From a ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Does scale invariance imply massless or continuous mass distribution?

$\newcommand{\ket}[1]{\lvert #1 \rangle}\newcommand{\bra}[1]{\langle #1 \rvert}\newcommand{\scp}[2]{\langle #1 \vert #2 \rangle}$ In his 2008 slides (PDF), Tzu-Chiang Yuan mentions the following on p. ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Fermion mass Higgs mechanism

How does a fermion, like an electron, get its mass through the Higgs-mechanism? Can someone explain me this with formulas (Lagrangian)? I know that the Yukawa interaction has something to do with ...