The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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3answers
356 views

Is it possible to have a singularity with zero mass?

A singularity, by the definition I know, is a point in space with infinite of a property such as density. Density is Mass/Volume. Since the volume of a singularity is 0, then the density will thus ...
5
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3answers
905 views

What is the mass of a wave?

The slide called "QUANTA" here says that "One Quantum has a definite mass" and the picture shows a wave. So, What is meant by the mass of a wave?
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4answers
2k views

Does everything with mass or energy have a gravitational pull?

As small as it may be, does every 'thing' have a gravitational pull? That is, something with mass or energy. No matter how obsolete or negligible it may be, is it there? If so, how is it calculated? ...
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1answer
2k views

Is there a finite amount of mass in the universe? [duplicate]

So, I'm not too physics savvy but I am curious to ask. Is there a finite amount of mass in the universe? or is there more and more being created from somewhere or something? If the universe is ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
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6answers
808 views

Does the weight of an hourglass change when sands are falling inside?

An hourglass H weighs h. When it's placed on a scale with all the sand rested in the lower portion, the scale reads weight x where x = h. Now, if you turn the hourglass upside down to let the sand ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between impulse and momentum?

What is the difference between impulse and momentum? The question says it all...I know the second of of them is mass * velocity, but what is the first one for, and when is it used? Also, what are its ...
5
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3answers
222 views

Charge Analog of the Higgs Boson?

Since mass can be given to particles via the interaction with the Higgs Field could there be a "Charger Field" that supplies particles with charge? Possibly this would require two different "charger ...
4
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1answer
69 views

What is the density and energy of a photon?

As I understand, photons are considered mass-less, which is a necessary condition for moving at the speed of light. However, does that mean their density is 0, as they will occupy some volume. If ...
4
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1answer
302 views

What the heck is negative effective mass?

I am reading this book:Solid State Electronic Devices by Ben G Streetman and Sanjay Kumar Banerjee. I have some doubts in the article 3.2.2 Effective mass. In this the aythors say that ...
4
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3answers
234 views

Precision of Coulomb's law

Up to which precision has the coulomb law proven to be true? I.e. if you have two electrons in a vacuum chamber, 5 meters appart, have the third order terms been ruled out? Are there any theoretical ...
4
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2answers
351 views

How to calculate the highest theoretical artificial hill?

The biggest peak in the world is Mount Everest. Imagine someone starting to make an artificial hill (like pyramide) from soil (earth). So, when starting with an 200x200 Km base area, with 45degree ...
3
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2answers
212 views

Does relativistic mass exhibit gravitiational effects?

Groundhog Day Update, 2014 The simple and dumb way to ask my main question is this: If something like a neutron start goes sailing by at very close to the speed of light, say fast enough to double ...
3
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2answers
303 views

Determination of mass density distribution of an object

This is a follow-up to a previous question How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?. My purpose is not to restart the flurry of more or less humorous jokes (which are not such a bad thing ...
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3answers
7k views

All matter has a mass but does all matter have a gravitational pull?

I know that all planets and stars have a gravitational pull but does a simple much smaller object have a gravitational pull for example a pebble?
2
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1answer
395 views

Fermion mass Higgs mechanism

How get fermion like a electron a mass through the higgs-mechanism? Can someone explain me this with formulas (Lagrangian)? I know that the Yukawa interaction has something to do with, is that right? ...
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1answer
101 views

Gravitational interactions by energy or by mass?

The mass-energy equivalence, first established by Einstein is an important and highly discussed phenomenon in physics. Without claiming much knowledge about high-end discussions on this topic, I would ...
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2answers
597 views

Why do photons add mass to a black hole?

Why do photons add mass to a black hole? When photons are taken irreversibly into a black hole does the mass of the BH increase?
0
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0answers
87 views

On motivation for the definition of ADM mass

The ADM mass is expressed in terms of the initial data as a surface integral over a surface $S$ at spatial infinity: $$M:=-\frac{1}{8\pi}\lim_{r\to \infty}\int_S(k-k_0)\sqrt{\sigma}dS$$ where ...
9
votes
2answers
509 views

Is everything made of massless particles?

Photons have no mass. Yet they interact gravitationally, as all energy does, with other energetic and massive particles. This means that if you put multiple photons in a system, you get something that ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

How do we know the masses of single stars?

I have recently read that we can only know the masses of stars in binary systems, because we use Kepler's third law to indirectly measure the mass. However, it is not hard to find measurements for the ...
5
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1answer
178 views

Question about Neutrino Flavor and Mass Eigenstates

I know the flavor and mass eigenstates are different, but are they related? What I mean is, in a process like fusion where electron neutrinos are created, do they start in the 1 mass eigenstate? My ...
5
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3answers
241 views

Could we prove that neutrinos have mass by measuring their gravitational signature?

It is now said that neutrinos have mass. If an object has mass then it also emits a gravitational field. I appreciate the neutrinos mass is predicted to be small, but as there are so many produced ...
4
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1answer
3k views

Terminal velocity of two equally shaped/sized objects with different weights?

I've tried doing research on this and there are some similar questions. However, they have slightly different scenarios and to make sure I understand things perfectly, I wanted to word it into my ...
4
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2answers
8k views

Does a scale measure weight or mass? [closed]

What does a measuring scale measure: mass or weight? I mean, when we stand on a weighing scale the reading we get is in $\mathrm{kg}$'s. What does this mean?
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5answers
1k views

Planck mass is about the mass of one eyebrow hair

Unlike most Planck units named after "Planck" such as Planck length, Planck temperature, etc, the Planck mass seems more closed to daily life. It is about $10^{-5}$g, same order of magnitude of one ...
4
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4answers
823 views

Relativistic mass and imaginary mass

The (relativistic) mass of an object measured by an observer in the $xyz$-frame is given by $$m = \frac{m_{rest}}{\sqrt{1 - \left(\frac{v}{c}\right)^2}}.$$ Mathematically $v$ could be greater than the ...
4
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2answers
623 views

What sort of “mass” is explained by the Higgs mechanism?

When I asked this question (probably in a less neutral form) to physicists, their answer was something along the lines that it's not gravity (i.e. unrelated to gravitons) but inertial mass. (So I ...
4
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2answers
697 views

What happens to a photon in a black hole?

Assume a photon enters the event horizon of a black hole. The gravity of the black hole will draw the photon into the singularity eventually. Doesn't the photon come to rest and therefore lose it's ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Orbital speed for a circular orbit?

I wanted to look up the formula for orbital speed for a circular orbit on Wikipedia, and I found 2 formulas: All bounded orbits where the gravity of a central body dominates are elliptical in ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

Baryon masses in Wetterich's new cosmology

Christoph Wetterich has put out a paper in which the universe isn't always expanding; it can be static or expanding just some of the time or even shrinking. And then there is an interaction which ...
3
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1answer
444 views

Have negative pressures any physical meaning?

Some cubic thermodynamical equations of state predict negative pressures, have negative pressures any physical meaning? Could they be related to negative mass?
3
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2answers
150 views

Gravitational distortion of an object's diameter, at a distance,

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are? What is the relationship between the optical distortion and the mass of the objects?
3
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2answers
2k views

First and Second Moment of Mass

I recently came across the definition of the Center of Mass of a system as the point about which the first moment of mass is zero. Further, it defined Moment of Inertia as the second moment of mass. ...
3
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3answers
6k views

Why does an object with higher speed gain more (relativistic) mass? [duplicate]

Today, in my high school physics class, we had an introductory class on electromagnetism. My teacher explained at some point that an object with a very high speed (he said it started to get somewhat ...
2
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2answers
86 views

Higgs field and masses of particles

Interaction of particle with Higgs field provides mass to the particles, then why still some particles are massless?
2
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2answers
90 views

Deceleration rate of objects of different mass but the same otherwise

Using a tennis ball as an example object, if one ball weighs 1 ounce and the other is 2 ounces, and both are struck at 100 mph on the same trajectory, would there be any difference in the deceleration ...
2
votes
1answer
127 views

Effective mass of a particle

I was reading about concept of effective mass on Wikipedia and came across the line that effective mass of a particle can be negative and even zero. How is this possible?
2
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1answer
72 views

If we were able to double the mass of the ordinary matter in the universe it will recollapse?

What will happen if we suppose to be able to add mass at the universe? For example doubling the mass of the ordinary matter?
2
votes
2answers
574 views

Can the mass of an orbiting object and the object being orbited be determined by the distance and orbit velocity alone? [duplicate]

This question is the inverse of: "Could an object orbit while moving at twice the speed, but at the same distance, if it had half the mass?" I'm curious about the nature of orbits, but am not well ...
2
votes
2answers
116 views

Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely?

As the title suggests, Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely? I am aware any mass produces and effects gravity but couldn't find ...
2
votes
2answers
205 views

Photons and Relativity

Consider a Photon from Sun and travels with a velocity $c$. Now think we are that photon. For us, it looks like Sun is moving away from us with a velocity $c$. So, why don't we get attracted back ...
2
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1answer
220 views

The role of dark matter in black holes and star formation

In my understanding, there exists a critical mass for which a star needs to be in order for it to collapse into a black hole. This also applies to a certain critical density of gas in order for stars ...
2
votes
1answer
338 views

Measuring the mass using angular velocities

I have 2 objects which are intially connected together, $O_1$ and $O_2$. When they are connected together, they have a rotation rate about their center of mass of $w_1$. $O_2$ is cleanly released from ...
1
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3answers
103 views

How can gravity affect light?

I understand that a black hole bends the fabric of space time to a point that no object can escape. I understand that light travels in a straight line along spacetime unless distorted by gravity. If ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Does the increase of (relativistic) mass, while flying near speed of light, has any impact on astronauts? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Would travelling at relativistic speeds have any impact on human biology? I am asking myself this question for a few day. What is the answer on: Does the increase of ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Free fall of two spheres made of same materials, different masses, with air resistance

Two people falling with the same parachute will gain different speeds if their masses are different. The upward air drag will needed to be bigger for a heavier person, since gravitational force is ...
0
votes
2answers
169 views

How can individual photons have different amounts of energy?

If photon is an elementary particle, how can different photons have different energy, if $E=mc^2$ and all photons have (or don't have) the same mass and the speed of photon is constant shouldn't it ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Square Cube Law?

I've heard about something called the square cube law. What is it? All I know of it is that it has something to do with mass of large objects and their gravitational influence.
0
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2answers
287 views

Energy of quarks and the mass of the proton

We know that energy of quarks inside the proton can not be exactly fixed because if it,the 'proton decay' must not be exist. My question is if the energy of quarks inside the proton is not exactly ...