The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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5
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9answers
427 views

Why does my apple not weigh 500 tons?

Related to this question: What is potential energy truly? $E=mc^2$ - energy equals mass. So, if an object has gravitational potential energy relative to another object, it should have additional mass ...
0
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2answers
38 views

Can center of mass move without any force?

For instance, consider a weight on one end of the ring. Assume that the ring has negligible mass compared to the weight. When the weight splits into two, moves around the ring and recombines at the ...
2
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0answers
43 views

How can a black hole increase mass? [duplicate]

As far as I know, the time dilation at the event horizon of a black hole is infinite, so everything falls asymptotically towards, but never reaching, the horizon for an outside observer. How then can ...
3
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1answer
37 views

How to determine sign of coefficients in simple spring, damper, mass system?

For a system of the sort shown below: I have come to realize that I continuously make mistakes when it comes to determining the signs (or specifically the direction of the forces) of the ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Evidence that stationary masses in space actually attract each other

I'm finding it rather difficult to find experimental evidence that two stationary masses in space (unaffected by external massive bodies or gravities) actually attract one another. For moving masses, ...
0
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6answers
160 views

Mass without Matter?

My cursory studies of general relativity had introduced me to the concept of how gravity is associated with the warping of spacetime and that the presence of matter in space warps space and this ...
0
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0answers
6 views

Tight bounds between maximum weight and precision

Scales are rated according to their precision and maximum load -- attributes which seem to be universally close to one another (within about 3x10^4 grams). Eg, a scale that can measure up to a ...
0
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1answer
23 views

Measuring mass zero G [closed]

I work for a company that produces (among other things) a microbalance that can measure mass/weight from around 100ng to 100mg ie it is accurate over 6 orders of magnitude. However, this relies on ...
11
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5answers
4k views

Why does a black hole have a finite mass?

I mean besides the obvious "it has to have finite mass or it would suck up the universe." A singularity is a dimensionless point in space with infinite density, if I'm not mistaken. If something is ...
3
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3answers
65 views

Why does reduced mass help when talking about two body problems?

I hear people say that reduced mass, $\mu$, is used for two body problems, but what sort of problems? Is it so that the two body system can be treated as one body or is it to simplify calculations ...
8
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2answers
166 views

Can a superpartner be less massive than its SM counterpart?

Theoretically, can a superpartner be less massive than its standard model counterpart? I realize there are experimental constraints.
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2answers
60 views

Understanding variable mass equation for mass ablation/ejection

The "Variable-mass system" entry in Wikipedia, under the "Mass ablation/ejection" title, shows: $$p_2 = (m+dm)(v+dv) + u(-dm)$$ The parameter $p_2$ is for the momentum at $t+dt$, meaning $p_2 = ...
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2answers
723 views

Is space-time a property of mass?

Imagine looking at a quasar millions of light years away. From your perspective, a photon emitted by the quasar has spent millions of years travelling through space, and its trajectory has been ...
13
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3answers
2k views

If the observable universe were compressed into a super massive black hole, how big would it be?

I understand only a little of general relativity, but that's why I'm here! :) Consider the hypothetical situation of some extra-terrestrial intelligence pushing all the mass in the observable ...
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1answer
27 views

Why are generally two of three effective masses identical?

In indirect semiconductors, the effective mass of electrons depend on the direction. There are three principle directions pointing away from the global energetic minimum in which the effective masses ...
4
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2answers
309 views

Where is Strong Equivalence Principle stronger than Weak Equivalence Principle

In my note, the two equivalence principles are stated as follows Weak Equivalence Principle: Gravitational and inertial masses are equal. Strong Equivalence Principle: There is no observable ...
2
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2answers
196 views

Understanding of the $m v^2/2$ formula for kinetic energy

I have some problem to intuitively understand why the kinetic energy grows quadratically with the velocity (at least in non-relativistic case). Assume the following experiment: we launch an unmanned ...
-4
votes
1answer
64 views

Higgs boson and gravity [closed]

I was reading earlier about how Higgs boson (aka The God Particle) is responsible for giving mass certain properties. Among these properties is gravity. What I'm wondering is, by studying Higgs boson, ...
-3
votes
2answers
2k views

If there is no gravity, does that mean there's no mass as well?

I have demonstrated that weight only is measured based on the gravitational pull of where you live. For example, the gravity on the surface of Mars is three times smaller than the gravity on the ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the curvature of space around mass independent of gravity?

Is the curvature of space caused by the local density of the energy in that area?Could gravity be a separate phenomenon only arising from the curvature of space? For instance if the density of energy ...
3
votes
5answers
724 views

Does $p=mc$ hold for photons?

Known that $E=hf$, $p=hf/c=h/\lambda$, then if $p=mc$, where $m$ is the (relativistic) mass, then $E=mc^2$ follows directly as an algebraic fact. Is this the case?
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1answer
65 views

What Is the Physics principle behind dropping a stone into a cup of water?

I have been doing an experiment about relationship between drop height of a stone and the loss of water in the cup it lands in. I found that after dropping the same stone into a cup with the same ...
1
vote
5answers
965 views

Is the earth expanding?

I recently saw this video on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJfBSc6e7QQ and I don't know what to make of it. It seems as if the theory has enough evidence to be correct but where would all ...
15
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4answers
1k views

Are Newton's “laws” of motion laws or definitions of force and mass?

If you consider them as laws, then there must be independent definitions of force and mass but I don't think there's such definitions. If you consider them as definitions, then why are they still ...
3
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3answers
630 views

What does “nearly infinite mass” mean?

I am sure this is a silly question, but I was reading something that described the pre big-bang universe as having "nearly infinite mass." How can something be "nearly" infinite? The term seems to ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Exoplanet Mass-Radius Diagram

I'm currently studying the following diagram: But I'm not entirely sure I understand what's going on. Is it just, that most exoplanets discovered, is pretty much made up of Hydrogen and Helium ? ...
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3answers
2k views

Why is spacetime curved by mass but not charge?

It is written everywhere that gravity is curvature of spacetime caused by the mass of the objects or something to the same effect. This raises a question with me: why isn't spacetime curved due to ...
5
votes
2answers
298 views

Do all the particles acquire mass in the Standard Model due to the Higgs mechanism only?

I know that a mass term for an intermediate boson is not compatible with the gauge symmetry. But in principle a mass term for the electron field does not violate a gauge symmetry. However to build an ...
0
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1answer
147 views

Weight of empty versus inflated balloon [duplicate]

Will the weight of a balloon filled with air be less than, greater than or the same as the same balloon after it has been deflated?
9
votes
2answers
215 views

Are all fermions massless at high temperatures?

According to the standard model, the electroweak symmetry is unbroken at high temperatures, and therefore all gauge bosons are massless then. But since fermions are said to acquire mass by a different ...
18
votes
7answers
1k views

Does the weight of an hourglass change when sands are falling inside?

An hourglass H weighs h. When it's placed on a scale with all the sand rested in the lower portion, the scale reads weight x where x = h. Now, if you turn the hourglass upside down to let the sand ...
3
votes
2answers
236 views

How to find the center of mass of several objects in a 2d plane?

We have the following scenario in a 2d plane: a big rectangle with a lot of smaller similar uniform rectangles in it, all of them weight differently. Where is the center of mass of this object ...
2
votes
5answers
552 views

A neutrino has rest-mass and travels at (near) $c$, why isn't its mass/ energy (nearly) infinite?

If the total energy of all three types of neutrinos exceeded an average of 50 eV per neutrino, there would be so much mass in the universe that it would collapse. This limit can be circumvented ...
3
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8answers
1k views

Does the (relativistic) mass change? Why?

I learned recently that when an object moves with a velocity comparable to the velocity of light the (relativistic) mass changes. How does this alteration take place?
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1answer
3k views

Can we determine the force an object exerts by its mass and acceleration?

I understand that the objects acceleration is determined by the force exerted on it, and that the force exerted on it is determined by its acceleration. But, does an object's (named A) acceleration ...
-2
votes
1answer
100 views

Questioning Einstein's view on gravity [duplicate]

Oke, so my mind is blown by Einsteins view on gravity, at least as far as I understand the basics and principles he based his views on. One of the first things that struck me was that most of his ...
-11
votes
1answer
162 views

How can magic be explained with Physics? [closed]

Assuming that, hypothetically, and for this example only, "magic" means things like magical powers. In movies, games, etc. we witness magic; however, it's never explained how it works with regards ...
17
votes
4answers
3k views

What's the difference between centre of mass & centre of gravity for massive bodies?

My book says: For most of the small objects, both are same. But for mammoth ones, they are really different ones. And in a gravity-less environment, COG is absent; COM still exists. Ok, what's ...
-2
votes
1answer
47 views

Center of mass finding question [closed]

Find the center of mass the rod in the figure if λ (the mass per unit lenght) varies with $x$ according to $\lambda=dm/dx=\beta x^2$, where $\beta$ is a constant. Sorry for quality of picture. I am ...
4
votes
1answer
200 views

What would happen if a negative mass crossed the event horizon of a black hole?

If negative mass really existed and somehow a very fast traveling negative mass object reached near the black hole's event horizon. What would happen when it crosses the event horizon? According to ...
3
votes
2answers
143 views

Origin of quark masses

Does all the mass of the quarks in the standard model come from the Higgs sector or is there also a contribution to quark masses due to QCD chiral symmetry breaking?
5
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6answers
1k views

Is a block of cotton heavier than a block of iron?

if i have a block of cotton and a block of iron each containing a weight of 100 kg when measured on a weighing machine, in reality which one is heaver than the other, which one is heavier and why? ...
-3
votes
4answers
2k views

How can light carry data if light has no mass, and data has mass?

Via a packet-switched network, like the internet, data is sent as packets (bits) wirelessly via radio waves with Wi-Fi, or 802.11g, etc. What my question is is this: Radio waves are light; light has ...
-2
votes
2answers
745 views

What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?

Look at this here. With respect to the sciences, the atom is obviously not the smallest piece of mass. Apparently, if people have already broken down the atom in to particles smaller than so, why ...
-7
votes
2answers
434 views

Which is the heaviest elementary particle? [closed]

Which elementary particle has the greatest rest mass? (For the sake of this question I'll call a photon's rest mass 0, whether it is or isn't [actually, tell me if this is the right thing to do]).
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votes
2answers
36 views

Can Mass be found based on Volume?

I am trying to calculate the mass of an object given the volume of an object without knowing what it is made of. Is there a formula to find out something like this considering the object is on Earth ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Does an Increase of Force affect the Speed of an object if the acceleration stays constant?

If I had a mass of $100\:\rm{kg}$ accelerating due to gravity, using $F=ma$: $F = 100\:\rm{kg} \times 9.8\:\rm{m/s^2}$ $F = 980 \:\rm N$... If I increased the mass to 200kg, the force would be 1960 ...
11
votes
3answers
2k views

Where does matter come from?

I admit, it's been a few years since I've studied physics, but the following question came to me when I was listening to a talk by Lawrence Krauss. Is there any knowledge of from where matter that ...
1
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1answer
49 views

What is the definition of density in a relativistic context?

In this question, there seems to be a clear presence of ambiguity, which raises the question: what is density in relativity? First of all, the question asks for the relativistic mass, "the apparent ...
1
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3answers
61 views

What should density of water be to keep box afloat?

I'm writing a platformer game and my physics engine is Box2D. I have successfully implemented buoyancy, but have a question about mass and density. My player is 80kg, a box has a density of 0.5 and ...