The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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Taking a derivative in a dynamic mass balance?

I'm practicing for a transport phenomena exam and I came across this question: A mothball with a diameter of 1.0 cm is hung (by a thread) in stationary air. Mothballs consist of pure naphthalene. ...
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75 views

Feathers and Human Flight

In the case of Angels where they're supposed to have wings full of feathers and can fly. If we created a flight suit for humans made out of feathers, how big would the feathers have to be? If the ...
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3answers
93 views

How can you explain objects of unequal masses falling at the same rate using GR?

Isn't gravity caused by the curvature of space-time, and the stronger it's curved the stronger the attraction? it makes more sense to me that if a heavier object is falling on earth it would fall ...
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272 views

Deceleration rate of objects of different mass but the same otherwise

Using a tennis ball as an example object, if one ball weighs 1 ounce and the other is 2 ounces, and both are struck at 100 mph on the same trajectory, would there be any difference in the deceleration ...
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6k views

Does a photon exert a gravitational pull?

I know a photon has zero rest mass, but it does have plenty of energy. Since energy and mass are equivalent does this mean that a photon (or more practically, a light beam) exerts a gravitational pull ...
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389 views

Question about finding $k$ in Hooke's Law

My textbook (Advanced Engineering Mathematics by Dennis Zill) offers the following explanation of Hooke's Law: By Hooke's Law, the spring itself exerts a restoring force $F$ opposite to the ...
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2answers
357 views

For a particle to have physical mass, is it always necessary to have a mass term in the lagrangian?

Since the self-energy adds to the bare mass defined in the Lagrangian, is it possible to create a physical particle mass from the self-energy alone, with no mass terms occuring in the Lagrangian? On ...
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3answers
307 views

What is the use (/ meaning) of $F =ma$? [closed]

I have noticed that Euler's formula for force is useful with a couple of natural forces (at distance), like gravity, that can follow a body any length. If you consider the most common occurrences of ...
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5k views

What did Tesla mean by “there is no energy in matter”?

I was reading "THE ETERNAL SOURCE OF ENERGY OF THE UNIVERSE, ORIGIN AND INTENSITY OF COSMIC RAYS" by Nikola Tesla, and he states: "There is no energy in matter except that absorbed from the ...
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1answer
69 views

Are there any naturally occurring examples of photons without mass?

I read that a photon is said to have zero mass at zero velocity. Does this mean that they only exist in a state of probability until observed && interacting with some system? And then when ...
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2answers
7k views

Preventing a block from sliding on a frictionless inclined plane

I want to demonstrate what force $F$ you would have to exert on an inclined plane of angle $t$, mass $M$ to prevent a block on top of it with mass $m$ from sliding up or down the ramp. I worked out ...
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42 views

Mass scaling in molecular dynamics

I've noticed some authors scale the mass of particles in molecular dynamics simulations while leaving the force field parameters the same in order to achieve materials of different densities. Does ...
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53 views

Can change in temperature cause a change in mass of an object?

If a gold bar is heated to say 200 degree Celsius then will it have the same mass at say 10 degree Celsius. Does energy has mass? If so then does this increased 'heat energy' cause an increase in the ...
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0answers
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Does negative mass reverse the arrow of time?

General relativity predicts that normal mass (positive mass) results in the curvature of spacetime which in return leads to gravitation. Since space and time are bonded together, any change on the ...
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44 views

How to calculate the mass of a sun that is similar to our own

How would you calculate the mass of a sun that could host a habitable planet, with only given the values of the mass of our own sun. And the fact that it takes a specific amount of years for life to ...
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512 views

Why does mass in the universe have no limit in large size, but has a limit in small size?

We found VY Canis Majoris, a star so big it can't even be seen in scaled illustratations with the sun itself. However, we stop at particle physics, or quantum mechanics, i.e. particles, subatomic, ...
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2answers
1k views

How did Newton find out gravity is proportional to the product of two masses? [duplicate]

I am going to ask a really stupid question here. It is a very well known fact that gravity is inversely proportional to the distance squared between two masses. I understand how he arrived at this ...
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4answers
97 views

Units about weight

We know that weight is measured in Newtons. Since, $weight= mass\times gravity$. What will be the units of Newton? Will that be $N = kg\times g$ ? But we always measure our weight using the unit $kg$! ...
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6answers
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Do photons gain mass when they travel through glass?

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that photons slow down when travelling through glass. Does this mean they gain mass? Otherwise, what happens to extra kinetic energy? I understand now ...
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39 views

Elements of particle mass

From what I can tell, it seems that particles have two kinds of mass, the mass inherent in a fundamental particle itself, or for composite particles, additional mass associated with the Higgs field. ...
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2answers
56 views

Connection between moment/torque and centre of gravity?

So I understand how moments work with regards to basic examples like pushing a door, in that the further you are away from the hinges of the door, the greater the moment, which is like a turning ...
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8answers
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Don't heavier objects actually fall faster because they exert their own gravity?

The common understanding is that, setting air resistance aside, all objects dropped to Earth fall at the same rate. This is often demonstrated through the thought experiment of cutting a large object ...
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3answers
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First and Second Moment of Mass

I recently came across the definition of the Center of Mass of a system as the point about which the first moment of mass is zero. Further, it defined Moment of Inertia as the second moment of mass. ...
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Why are $W$ bosons massless above electroweak scale? [duplicate]

Because of the Higgs mechanism, one must replace the Higgs field $\phi$ with $\phi_0 + \phi_1$ where $\phi_0$ is the vacuum expectation value. As far as I understand, the $\phi_0$ gives the mass term ...
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3answers
691 views

Where does the majority of the mass of the usual matter come from? [duplicate]

I apologize in advance to experts for the naivety of the question. It should be a duplicate but I didn't find any satifying question or answer about that. The proton is composed by two up quarks ...
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1answer
44 views

Do we weigh more when standing near massive buildings?

I'm very new to the concepts of SR/GR and curvature of spacetime. My understanding is that the bending of spacetime is the causation of gravity, and that matter is the causation of the bending of ...
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36 views

How black hole lose mass? [duplicate]

Even in empty space virtual particles can constantly pop in and out of existence in pairs, when 1 of the pair fall into the black hole while the other escape this is hawking radiation but black hole ...
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What is the difference between pole and running mass?

For example, when we meassure Higgs boson mass to be 125 GeV, do we think about renormalized or pole mass? Should the mass of the Higgs change if it is produced at higher energies?
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1answer
76 views

Does scale invariance imply massless or continuous mass distribution?

$\newcommand{\ket}[1]{\lvert #1 \rangle}\newcommand{\bra}[1]{\langle #1 \rvert}\newcommand{\scp}[2]{\langle #1 \vert #2 \rangle}$ In his 2008 slides Unparticle Phenomenology (PDF), Tzu-Chiang Yuan ...
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70 views

Pressure, density, volume and mass in a room

Here's the question. A window in the room is open. The next day, the temperature of the room has increased, but the pressure of the air stayed the same. State and explain what has happened to ...
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3answers
447 views

Why do non-accelerating objects exert force on each other?

The equation for force is $\vec{F} = m\vec{a}$, where $\vec{a}$ is acceleration. Acceleration is a change in velocity. However, if an object with constant velocity (i.e. 0 acceleration) hits another ...
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1answer
98 views

Commercial large scale production of graphene

I am a third year undergraduate Physics student, and for my solid state physics course I am asked to give a short (10 minute) qualitative presentation on the current standings of graphene production, ...
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154 views

Current known *lower* bounds to the neutrino masses?

I started a little bit of Googling around the topic, and found very few information. There are mainly upper limits. I found lower limits only to the rest mass differences of the different neutrino ...
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1answer
46 views

How would an atom behave (in terms of atomic particles) if the electrons were much heavier than the nucleus?

In other words, does the mass of electrically charged particles affect the electromagnetic forces that operate between them ? Is the electrons revolving around the nucleus simply a consequence of the ...
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952 views

Why does the Standard Model predict Neutrinos are massless?

Why are neutrinos massless in the Standard Model? Is it connected with experimental fact that neutrinos always have only one direction of projection of spin on motion direction?
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73 views

What is the difference between the mass of 100g and the weight of 1newton? [duplicate]

I was flicking through my physics textbook (as you do when you need to revise for a test that is going to decide your grade of the whole year), when a certain question caught my eye it read: Explain ...
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2answers
657 views

How to find the center of mass of several objects in a 2d plane?

We have the following scenario in a 2d plane: a big rectangle with a lot of smaller similar uniform rectangles in it, all of them weight differently. Where is the center of mass of this object ...
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5answers
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Will 1 gram of matter moving at relativistic speeds completely annihilate a larger quantity of stationary antimatter?

This is a question about the relativistic mass concept which I am having trouble understanding, mainly because of the scenario below. Simple scenario: Suppose 1 gram of matter is accelerated to 99% ...
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2answers
565 views

Measure mass difference of an object without a scale

For a project i need to separate items based on their mass in real time. I like to explore measuring weight of an object (round metal ball) by taking photographs (several) during free fall and ...
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3answers
8k views

Do light and sound waves have mass

I have been reading Hawking's 'A Brief History of Time' and it has gotten me thinking about Einstein's theory of relativity, in that it assumes that an object must have infinite mass if it is to be ...
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278 views

Explicit supersymmetry breaking fermion mass terms

I hope you can clear up my following confusions. In Girardello's and Grisaru's paper (Nuclear Physics B, 194, 65 (1982)) where they analysed the most general soft explicit supersymmetry breaking ...
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4answers
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What is the exact gravitational force between two masses including relativistic effects?

I was wondering if there is a closed-form formula for the force between two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ if relativistic effects are included. My understanding is that the classic formula $G \frac{m_1 ...
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1answer
41 views

Are all ground state protons the exact same mass and have the same number of elementary particles?

I have read that it is a misconception that a proton only has 3 quarks (2 up and one down). In reality, it seems there are many, many ("zillions" is the number I saw quoted) quarks in a proton. Do ...
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58 views

Kettlebell squats center of mass

I should, first of all, state that I have very limited knowledge of physics but as a fitness enthusiast the following question has puzzled me for a while. When I do squats on the gym holding a ...
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2answers
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A different interpretation of $E=mc^2$ but no idea what it might mean [closed]

I wanted $E=mc^2$ to look like an 'inverse square' sort of a formula. So this is what I derived: $E=mc^2$, so; $m=E/c^2$, assuming $E=E_1E_2$ (I am aware that when you decompose energy into two ...
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2answers
50 views

How to calculate centre of mass

How do I find the centre of mass with given coordinates? For example if we have four objects with mass $m$ at coordinates of a square $(0,0,0),(0,0,a),(0,a,0),(0,a,a)$ or another example with eight ...
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3answers
105 views

How do we measure mass?

How do you measure mass? Weight is easy using a scale, but we can't measure mass that way, because then mass would be different on every planet. I know there was a Veritasium video (here) on defining ...
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4answers
111 views

How to measure the mass of Earth?

I was wondering how you can measure the mass of Earth. From what I find on the internet, people are using Newton's Laws. But how can you do that ? Newton's Laws are assumed to work because you know a ...
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1answer
35 views

Center of mass of planar lamina

Suppose that $D$ is a closed region in $\mathbb R^2$ and let $\rho$ be a density function on $D$. Then, is it possible that the center of mass lies on the boundary of $D$? My intuition tells me that ...
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4answers
237 views

What is the difference between the Higgs Boson particle and an electron moving through the Higgs field?

I am watching a lecture by Sean Caroll titled "Particles, Fields, and the Future of Physics". I am not a physicist by any means but enjoy the subject in my spare time hoping to understand it. This ...