The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

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How can I find the amplitude?

Prove that the motion of a mass $m$ on a linear spring with constant $k$, has the form $$y (t) = A \sin(wt+f),$$ where $t$ is the time and $A, w, f$ are constants. We know that for $t = 0, y(0)=y_{0}$ ...
0
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1answer
184 views

Mechanical system modeling

I have a mechanical system and I need to model in differential equations I tried to model the mass $M_1$ and got this $m_1\displaystyle\frac{d^2\,x}{dt^2}=F-K_1(x_2 - ...
4
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3answers
774 views

Calculating the Center of Mass

We have a homogeneous body that looks like this: I have tried dividing the body into different parts using the following definition: R g * A = R 1 * A 1 + ... R n * A n I was thinking I could ...
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0answers
63 views

Confusion about the (relativistic) mass of objects [duplicate]

According to Einstein's theory the (relativistic) mass of objects depend on speed. Then in an inertial reference frame 2 observers moving at 2 different velocities will calculate different masses for ...
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2answers
1k views

Does the fact that protons and neutrons have larger mass than electrons mean they're bigger in size?

and so if a proton is so larger than an electron doesn't that mean it has a shape? What would be the shape of a subatomic particle? are they spherical?
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338 views

How to estimate a person's mass from a sensor? [closed]

I'm trying to estimate the person's weight from some available sensors and I have an accelerometer, a gyrometer and a magnetometer. The triaxial accelerometer is fixed in a band in the person's ...
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0answers
52 views

Mass of dark matter

The Alcubierre warp equation specifies that negative mass is required for said "warp drive" to function properly. Could dark matter provide the negative mass that's required?
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2answers
178 views

Hawking evaporation is due to NEGATIVE mass?

So I have seen an animation about Stephen Hawking (after his recent study state universes claim) that Hawking evaporation is due to negative mass; But how is this possible? I mean, there is no such ...
2
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1answer
90 views

Non-vanishing commutator of potential and mass matrices for Majorana fermions interaction theory

Consider 2 different Majorana fermions $\Psi_{L}, \Psi_{R}$ (physically, neutrinos). In general case I can write the massive part of lagrangian of these fermions in the form $$ L_{m} = (\bar ...
5
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3answers
994 views

Can a mass matrix be asymmetric?

I am developing a mathematical model of a mechanical device consisting basically of coupled harmonic oscillators. It turns out that the system mass matrix is asymmetric. I seem to read somewhere that ...
0
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1answer
86 views

What is the mass required for a star to have the gravity equivalent to a black hole?

At what mass does the light from stars ( I am talking about stars and not black holes) fail to escape the star's gravity? Is it the same (minimum) mass required for an object to be called a black ...
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2answers
393 views

Mass gap for photons

I am puzzled by the answers to the question: What is a mass gap? There, Ron Maimon's answer gives a clear-cut definition, which I suppose applies to any quantum field theory with Hamiltonian $H$, ...
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1answer
133 views

Finding the mass of 7cm string [closed]

If a string has $120$ g and length $40$ cm. I found that the linear mass density is given by $$120g/40cm=\ linear\ mass\ density$$ How do I use this to find the mass of a $7$cm of the same kind of ...
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4answers
165 views

Mass in terms of special relativity

According to special relativity mass doesnt add up like we think it does. That is, a system of 2 protons might not necessarily have a system mass of 2*(mass of one proton). If the protons are ...
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1answer
746 views

effect of object mass in coeficient of restitution

I know the coefficient of restitution depends on the velocity before and after the impact of a bouncing ball. How does the mass affect it. Can't figure it out. v ...
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2answers
170 views

Time Delays in General Relativity

If gravity propagates at, or less than, the speed of light, and is therefore not instantaneous, does that introduce time delays to gravity? For example: suppose that we, the observer, sit within the ...
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2answers
180 views

Why can't I calculate center of mass via torque? Results off by a few percent

Why do I keep getting a slightly different result from the following two ways of determining the center of mass of a rigid, geometrically simple object? The object is a rectangular 5(x) by 7(y) ...
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6answers
3k views

What keeps mass from turning into energy?

I understand the energy and mass can change back and forth according to Einstein. It is fluid; it can go from one to the other. So, what keeps mass from just turning into energy? Is there some force ...
0
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1answer
111 views

Relativistic momentum and mass [duplicate]

Is there even a relativistic mass or just relativistic momentum? How does one reason to prefer one over another? What is the problem with saying a hot gas will have more mass/inertia to it?
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1answer
391 views

Does corrosion of iron increase its mass?

Does corrosion of a sample of iron increases or decreases its mass? I think that the mass will increase because of additional oxygen atoms.
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2answers
225 views

When “weight” of an object is listed, is it really the mass or the weight?

I Have read an earlier post regarding this, but the answer wasn't perfect enough or I didn't understand so! Let me put it to clear, I know difference between weight and mass. Also I know the ...
2
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3answers
313 views

How can the Lorentz transformation cause two objects' masses to both increase?

Suppose there are two people A and B. A is standing on the earth and B is on a rocket in space. Now B passes by the earth at a speed of 0.9c and A sees him. According to A, B's mass would have ...
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0answers
214 views

Reducing massive representation of the Poincare group to the massless one

I want to ask about the connection for massive and massless representation of the Poincare group. Sorry for the awkwardness. First I must to represent the formalism for both of cases. Massive ...
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2answers
2k views

Polarization vectors of massive and massless particles

I read from Mandl & Shaw that when quantizing massless vector particles such as photons in Lorentz gauge, there are 4 linearly independent polarization vectors (2 of them being able to "gauged ...
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1answer
434 views

Question about Neutrino Flavor and Mass Eigenstates

I know the flavor and mass eigenstates are different, but are they related? What I mean is, in a process like fusion where electron neutrinos are created, do they start in the 1 mass eigenstate? My ...
2
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1answer
131 views

Neutrino mass and energy question

If a neutrino has mass then it travels less than the speed of light. Suppose I boost myself to the rest frame; i.e. bring it to rest in the laboratory. Now if it oscillates between different states ...
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2answers
3k views

Increase in Mass with Velocity [duplicate]

I just had a confusion. Does the mass of the body actually increase when it is moving with a certain velocity? Or does it only look like the mass has increase to another observer. How can the actual ...
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6answers
3k views

What is the symmetry which is responsible for conservation of mass?

According to Noether's theorem, all conservation laws originate from invariance of a system to shifts in a certain space. For example conservation of energy stems from invariance to time translation. ...
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1answer
519 views

Pauli-Fierz “massive” equation and linearized gravity

It it known that the massive spin-2 irreducible representation of the Poincare group is the traceless symmetrical transverse 4-tensor $h_{\mu \nu}$ with rank 2: $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})h_{\mu \nu} = ...
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3answers
445 views

Mass in terms of energy

Given the relationships between mass and energy in relativity, and given that particles with mass can be created given energy over the threshold energy, and vice-versa, can we say that mass is simply ...
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1answer
159 views

Are there any good references on the “gravitational” curvature of spacetime of a moving mass being distorted due to special relativity?

In this Wikipedia paragraph suggesting an explanation for the phenomenon of inertia, it claims: Another physicist, Vern Smalley, has derived the Lorentz transformation for mass by assuming that ...
5
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2answers
267 views

Does the recent re-count of stars in elliptical gallaxies affect our understanding of the universal mass balance?

I've seen several popular reports of a new count of low-mass stars in elliptical galaxies (here's one). Edit: Pursuant to several correct comments I've changed the title to agree with the actual ...
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1answer
129 views

Stacking Shelves with Overhang

I want to stack some boxes which are 14" x 10" with some 12" records inside. This means that there will be a 2" overhang outside of each box. I know that to have an item to balance on a edge 50% of ...
15
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1answer
491 views

Is it only the Higgs field that stops me from getting to $c$?

Is it only the higgs field that stops me from accelerating up to the speed of light or is there other restriction concerning the increase in mass? In other words if I had a Higgs field shield on my ...
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1answer
122 views

Is there a minimum mass is required for light to be noticeably bent?

The sun bends the trajectory of light slightly. And a black hole will bend the trajectory entirely. This is all dependent on the proximity to the source of gravity. For a given angle, is there some ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
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1answer
1k views

Why do some particles have a greater mass than others?

The property of mass that almost every particle possesses comes from the Higgs Field. It is this field, which permeates all of space, that particles interact with and hence obtain mass. But why do ...
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2answers
53 views

Are high redshift masses corrected for relativistic mass dilation? They would appear more massive right?

A distant quasar would be less massive in its frame of reference than our observations would suggest. Are such highly red-shifted objects corrected for relativistic mass dilation?
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1answer
299 views

Why do charge on an object remains unaffected by the motion of the object?

Unlike mass, the charge on an object is said to be unaffected by the motion of the object. This statement in my text book, is not yet understood by me. I don't know theory of relativity. On ...
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2answers
1k views

Charge to mass ratio inversely proportional to curved path radius?

In a cloud or bubble chamber, charged particles follow circular paths. I learned that charge to mass ratio of the particles is inversely proportional to the radius of the path. Thus, a particle ...
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1answer
301 views

What happens when half of an orbiting object's matter is annihilated?

Suppose object A orbits object B, and that there are no outside gravitational influences non-Sun gravity influences, and that object A is completely spherical and its mass is evenly distributed. Now, ...
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2answers
895 views

If nothing weighs something then doesn't that mean there is mass associated with spacetime?

Lawrence M. Krauss says, "If you removed all of the particles, all of the radiation,absolutely everything from space and all that remained was nothing that nothing would weigh something." What ...
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1answer
118 views

Mass is rigidity?

In General Relativity, a totally rigid body cannot be accelerated. It will behave like something of infinite mass. Similarly a body of two separated particles which connected to each other with a ...
10
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between 'running' and 'current' quark mass?

When looking at the PDG, there is a difference between the 'running' and the 'current' quark masses. Does anyone know which is the difference between these two?
3
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3answers
443 views

Einstein equation $E=mc^2$: Does it mean an object without mass does not have energy?

Einstein equation $E=mc^2$ where $E$ is energy, $m$ mass, and $c$ the speed of light in vacuum. So does it mean objects without any mass does not posses energy for eg lights photons does not have mass ...
8
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1answer
586 views

Question about Majorana fermions

I have a few questions about Majorana fermions. What is Majorana mass? Does it have a different value compared to the mass in the Dirac equation for an arbitrary fermion? How exactly do they differ? ...
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0answers
37 views

Good and simple reference for studying about ADM mass [duplicate]

I need a good and simple reference for studying about ADM mass. Can someone introduce me one?
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0answers
133 views

On motivation for the definition of ADM mass

The ADM mass is expressed in terms of the initial data as a surface integral over a surface $S$ at spatial infinity: $$M:=-\frac{1}{8\pi}\lim_{r\to \infty}\int_S(k-k_0)\sqrt{\sigma}dS$$ where ...
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2answers
420 views

How is it possible to move something without completely lifting it?

For example, let's assume a chair here: It can be "slid" across the force if we use minimal upwards force, but not enough to actually "lift" the chair. Why should it move? Here's a better example: I ...
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4answers
29k views

Relationship between mass, energy, and a force?

I've never truly understood the relationship between mass, energy, and force. I know what each of the three are, I just don't fully understand how they interact with each other. For example, How ...