The property of an object that determines how much it responds to a force in Newtonian mechanics, and how much it interacts with gravity in the Newtonian framework. Mass also refers to the intrinsic energy of a particle in particle physics.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
271 views

Lepton masses in the Standard Model

Some simple questions regarding leptonic masses in the Standard Model (SM): Why there is not an explicit mass term in addition to the effective mass term that arises from the Yukawa terms after ...
4
votes
2answers
670 views

What sort of “mass” is explained by the Higgs mechanism?

When I asked this question (probably in a less neutral form) to physicists, their answer was something along the lines that it's not gravity (i.e. unrelated to gravitons) but inertial mass. (So I ...
2
votes
5answers
3k views

Why Gravity attracts all objects with the same speed?

Why Gravity attracts all objects with the same speed? Is this question was solved? What is the exact answer?
2
votes
1answer
282 views

What is meant by the rest energy of non-composite particle?

When talking about the rest energy of a composite particle such as a proton, part of the rest energy is accounted for by the internal kinetic energy of its constituent quarks. But what is physically ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Why can't gauge bosons have mass?

Clearly, a mass term for a vector field would render the Lagrangian not gauge-invariant, but what are the consequences of this? Gauge invariance is supposed to be crucial for the renormalisation of a ...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Are there any well-known theories successfully unifying the inertial and gravitational mass?

From what little I know of general relativity, the equality of inertial and gravitational mass is an axiom of the theory. I suspect that this precludes GR from unifying them in the same sense as ...
3
votes
2answers
478 views

Why are particles different sizes?

Is it correct in saying that a particles size is it's rest energy, and that particles don't actually have size (in the way you get different size objects)? What defines what sizes a particle can be? ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Relation between Newtons and Kilograms

Work is expressed as W=F*d, where the F is in Newton, d is in meters and result ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Transforming a sound wave into a literal light wave. Is it possible? [duplicate]

Literally transforming sound into an actual light wave seems almost impossible. But transforming the sound wave into a light wave while containing a single mass? I know that sound can contain a mass ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between pole and running mass?

For example, when we meassure Higgs boson mass to be 125 GeV, do we think about renormalized or pole mass? Should the mass of the Higgs change if it is produced at higher energies?
4
votes
3answers
333 views

Does Standard Model confirm that mass assigned by Higgs Mechanism creates gravitational field?

I am not comparing passive gravitational mass with rest inertial mass. Is there an evidence in Standard Model which says that active gravitational mass is essentially mass assigned by Higgs mechanism. ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is Higgs Boson given the name “The God Particle”?

Higgs Boson (messenger particle of Higgs field) accounts for inertial mass, not gravitational mass. So, how could it account for formation of universe as we know it today? I think, gravity accounts ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Does Dark Matter interact with Higgs Field?

Dark matter does have gravitational mass as we know from its discovery. Does it have inertial mass?
1
vote
1answer
248 views

Why not accurate masses of elementary particles?

In the standard model of particle accuracy in calculating mass is very low. And you can not predict the upper limit of Higgs particle mass accurately. Why not accurate masses of elementary particles?
2
votes
1answer
258 views

The role of dark matter in black holes and star formation

In my understanding, there exists a critical mass for which a star needs to be in order for it to collapse into a black hole. This also applies to a certain critical density of gas in order for stars ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Space station gains enough mass to lose orbit?

I.S.S is constantly being improved (add-ons). Will the space station need to be moved to a higher orbit at some point?
0
votes
2answers
937 views

Conservation of momentum equation, how do I factor out v0Final and v1Final?

I am trying to figure out an equation for conservation of momentum. So, If combined momentum before and after the collision is the same, and momentum is velocity times mass, then for 2 objects (A,B), ...
-2
votes
1answer
280 views

future light cones and light paths

I understand that an event, in a four dimensional space-time, produces a light cone. As time increases the cones gets larger on either side of the event (past and future). For example the if the sun ...
1
vote
1answer
441 views

The Strength Of A Black Hole

Does the gravitational strength of a black hole at its singularity change the more it pulls things into it?
1
vote
3answers
135 views

Carrying water on person, or on the frame when bicycling

So, the question is as follows: What is the difference in work exerted by the rider in the two following scenarios? a) Rider + bike. Water carried in a holder on the frame b) Rider + bike. Water ...
-1
votes
1answer
235 views

Clarification of rest mass

So I have only just been introduced to the concept of rest mass in Special Relativity. Do we assume that the rest mass of a fundamental particle is constant in all inertial reference frames? i.e. is ...
1
vote
1answer
498 views

How does a star wobble due to orbiting bodies

What equations determine how a star wobbles in response to an orbiting planet, and can it be used to determine the mass of distant objects based on the wobble? If there are other more reliable ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How do you weigh a box on a scale whose limit is too low?

As you will see I know nothing about physics and after being asked to solve a physics problem in a recent interview wanted to ask it of professionals and see what the response would be: I have a set ...
2
votes
2answers
195 views

Which new insight did $E=mc^2$ give us?

I had a special relativity course at university. Now I'm trying to extract what new insight $E=mc^2$ did give us. I mean that moving mass has/is energy (kinetic) not new. The energy merely changed ...
3
votes
1answer
164 views

Neutrino Oscillation and their gravitational implications

As I understand neutrinos, there are three different flavors, all with different masses. Although the masses of these neutrinos have not been directly measured, their mass differences have been. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
1
vote
1answer
182 views

How to explain relativistic mass with 2 moving systems, but not 3?

All the visual explanations I know work in some kind of "If you are moving relative to something A, while inside A something is moving, the stuff in A has to move slower due time dilation and ...
1
vote
2answers
946 views

At what point does a projectile leave a slingshot?

Assuming a frictionless / "perfect" environment, and given a ball held in an elastic sling (like a hand-held catapult) where the pocket is lighter than the projectile itself, what is the point at ...
0
votes
2answers
317 views

What is the interaction with Higgs field(s) that give the quarks so much different masses?

The masses of quarks are: mu 2∼3 MeV md 4∼6 MeV mc 1.3 GeV ms 80∼130 MeV mt 173 GeV mb 4∼5 GeV
1
vote
1answer
1k views

If photons are deflected by a strong gravitational field, then how come photons do not have mass? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Explain how (or if) a box full of photons would weigh more due to massless photons It has been proved and showed through experiments that light can be bent by the Sun or ...
3
votes
1answer
635 views

Can we explain physical similarities between Black Scholes PDE and the Mass Balance PDE (e.g. Advection-Diffusion equation)?

Both the Black-Scholes PDE{*} and the Mass/Material Balance PDE have a similar mathematical form of the PDE which is evident from the fact that on change of variables from Black-Scholes PDE we derive ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

What defines the mass of elementary particle?

The electron is particle. The mass of electron is $9.10938215(45)\times 10^{−31}\, {\rm kg}$. But why is the mass exactly what it is? What in physics defines the mass of elementary particle?
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Increasing mass' effect on the balance between centripetal force and centrifugal force

Okay, this is nothing more than a thought experiment which popped into my head while driving home from work today. Take the case of a single body orbiting another, larger body, as in a planet and a ...
5
votes
3answers
247 views

Could we prove that neutrinos have mass by measuring their gravitational signature?

It is now said that neutrinos have mass. If an object has mass then it also emits a gravitational field. I appreciate the neutrinos mass is predicted to be small, but as there are so many produced ...
3
votes
2answers
879 views

Does a photon see a 0-D universe?

For a massless particle the spacetime interval between its point of emission and point of absorption is zero: the two points coincide. From the vantage point of such a particle space-time has reduced ...
2
votes
1answer
512 views

momentum conservation question involving a rocket and a spaceship [closed]

With the engines off a space ship is cruising at a velocity of 230m.s It fires a rocket straight ahead at the enememy vessel. The mass of the rocket is 1300kg and the mas of the ship (not including ...
3
votes
3answers
446 views

storing energy (as mass)

When chemical energy is released mass is reduced, if only by a negligible amount. Presumably that's true for all energy. And presumably that works in reverse as well: storing energy involves an ...
1
vote
1answer
905 views

Calculating the force of a mass bearing down on an object

I need to calculate the force of a weight bearing down on a smaller object, constraining it from expansion. The weight bearing down has a much bigger surface area than the smaller object. I know the ...
3
votes
2answers
103 views

How long does it take to weigh an uncooperative mass?

(This is curiosity, not a practical question. It was inspired by standing still for a digital scale, and considering whether it would be possible to make a scale that could handle being jumped on, ...
2
votes
1answer
296 views

What is the mass of a photon in non-empty spaces?

It is a well known result of the special theory of relativity that the photon has no rest mass, because for a particle to attain the speed of light, it must have zero rest-mass. I will not dig into ...
0
votes
2answers
433 views

How far does physics influence russian roulette?

Prompted by this discussion on the math exchange My thought was that the added mass of a bullet in an otherwise empty revolver would bias the chamber spin such that the bullet would remain in one of ...
2
votes
1answer
228 views

Can non-free forces change the rest mass?

While reading Hobsen et al.'s "General Relativity: An Introduction for Physicists", I came across a bit confusing derivation. Multiplying the 4-force and 4-velocity, the following derivation can be ...
6
votes
6answers
2k views
2
votes
2answers
486 views

Does the measured mass of earth include that of the atmosphere?

Just what the title states please... and perhaps naive too... Wikipedia pegs the mass of our Earth at 5.9722 × 10^24 kg. Does this figure include the mass of the Atmosphere?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How could something have negative mass?

With all the theories on how Neutrinos apparently broke the light barrier, there was one theory someone told me of how neutrinos might have less than zero mass, but she didn't explain how this was ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What if we could give photons some mass?

I was reading an article and these paragraphs got me wondering... Before I list the replies, here is some background. The Higgs mechanism describes an invisible field that, it is argued, split one ...
2
votes
1answer
177 views

Motion is relative, right? And most pop sci relativity explanations are somewhat incorrect?

On page 20 of A Brief History of Time: . . . all observers should measure the same speed of light, no matter how fast they are moving. But in an observer's frame of reference, they're actually ...
4
votes
1answer
226 views

Is there a theory which treats particles as classical point singularities?

Is there a published theory that looks at all matter as occupying no space and only being felt because of its gravitational pull? We've been taught in school that matter has mass and occupies space. ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Do we have an idea about the amount of matter in the universe?

Do we consider the amount of matter in the universe to be "infinite"? Or do we have an idea about "how much" there is?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Calculating the gravitational acceleration inside of a planet

Plant X has a radius of 5000 km and is composed of two layers. The first inner layer ranges from the centre to 2000 km from centre, it's density is 8 kg / dm^3. The second layer ranges from 2000 ...