1
vote
0answers
60 views

Is inertia actually a property of the force rather than the mass?

I ask this because it occurred to me that the inertial property of mass only actually arises in the context of forces (such as the EM force) as a resistance to their accelerating effect. Inertia plays ...
2
votes
1answer
743 views

Does a black hole have any kind of mass?

Currently in my academics I am studying about the Gravitation. In the chapter I came across a term called the Escape Velocity (It's the velocity of any celestial body which is required by an object to ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Lagrangian point or dark matter?

We know that spiral galaxies spin in a way such that we have to assume that dark matter is responsible for the extra mass required to do so. My question is, can Lagrangian points (L1 and L2) be used ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Square Cube Law?

I've heard about something called the square cube law. What is it? All I know of it is that it has something to do with mass of large objects and their gravitational influence.
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Visualizing Tension in FBD — Rope With Mass

Asked to find the tension of a point that is halfway up a rope (where the rope has mass), given the system: The solution of the problem (FBD included) is as follows. In this diagram (Tm = tension ...
8
votes
2answers
168 views

Why do clouds fly? [duplicate]

I know it's probably the most stupid question there is, but why do they fly are the clouds lighter than air? What's keeping those tiny ice structures floating miles about the ground? I've been looking ...
9
votes
6answers
1k views

Why can light (photons) bends in a curve through space without mass? [duplicate]

I've heard that light can form a curve if they travel near high-mass stars or even a black hole with strong gravity. Which is according to this Newtonian formula $$\large ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

gravity cancelling dark energy

Say there were 2 objects with certain masses (e.g. $m_1$ and $m_2$). If they were close together gravity would attract the 2 objects. If they were a large distance apart the expansion of the universe ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Calculating Gravitational Attraction Involving Massless Objects

Using the formula $F=G\frac{m_1m_2}{d^2}$ where $m_1$and $m_2$ are the masses of two objects, $G$ is the gravitational constant, and $d$ is the distance between the objects, it is possible to ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Could there be massive gravitons and in our spacetime? [closed]

My question is: Could there in principle be sub-groups of gravitons (if they existed) that has mass (and in our spacetime dimensions) such as those affected by electric or by strong force or other ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

The nature of the gravity force: Is it attractive or repulsive between positive and negative mass? [duplicate]

If negative mass is rotating around fixed positive mass, then what will be the nature of force and how?
0
votes
2answers
126 views

Gravitational compression in the atmosphere

One of the two sources of Earth's heat is primordial heat, which is the product of gravitational compression and impacts during Earth's formation. My understanding is that work is done on the core, ...
3
votes
1answer
117 views

How much weight can a person carry to avoid being blown over by wind?

I wonder if there is a certain amount of weight that I could carry in a rolling bag to help prevent me from being knocked over by the wind. I have balance problems and some lack of muscle strength in ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

Time Delays in General Relativity

If gravity propagates at, or less than, the speed of light, and is therefore not instantaneous, does that introduce time delays to gravity? For example: suppose that we, the observer, sit within the ...
0
votes
2answers
95 views

Why can't I calculate center of mass via torque? Results off by a few percent

Why do I keep getting a slightly different result from the following two ways of determining the center of mass of a rigid, geometrically simple object? The object is a rectangular 5(x) by 7(y) ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Gravitational interactions by energy?

The mass-energy equivalence, first established by Einstein is an important and highly discussed phenomenon in physics. Without claiming much knowledge about high-end discussions on this topic, I would ...
1
vote
2answers
203 views

Does influence on gravity increase with mass when velocities approach the speed of light? [duplicate]

In other words, when a particle's mass increases significantly as it approaches the speed of light (c), does its influence on gravity increase, and if so, does it increase proportionally?
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Agreggating the masses and coordinates of a number of points to calculate their gravitational pull on an object in a single step

I have $n$ points, each of these have a set of coordinates and a mass; what I want to do is calculate the resultant force they induce on an object whose coordinates I also know. I can do that simply ...
2
votes
2answers
184 views

Barbells and gravity

A giant set of bar bells floating in space (like two identical sized planets connected by a long rod) would have a centre of mass midway between the two on the connecting rod. But surely it would ...
2
votes
2answers
494 views

Can the mass of an orbiting object and the object being orbited be determined by the distance and orbit velocity alone? [duplicate]

This question is the inverse of: "Could an object orbit while moving at twice the speed, but at the same distance, if it had half the mass?" I'm curious about the nature of orbits, but am not well ...
-2
votes
1answer
150 views

Mass - Gravitational pull - centrifugal force

In relation to mass/gravitational/centrifugal force. Is the increased gravitational force due to the increase in mass of a planet (i.e. earth) from meteorites, etc.. directly proportional to the ...
2
votes
3answers
712 views

How does energy convert to matter? [duplicate]

To my understanding, matter and energy are one and the same. Shifting from $E$ to $M$ in Einstein's famous equation requires only a large negative acceleration. If $M$ really is $E/c^2$, does that ...
1
vote
1answer
150 views

Defining the star as the ellipse focus rather than the barycenter, what does the other focus do? [duplicate]

There are a lot of images and animations on the internet depicting two bodies orbiting around their common barycenter. The barycenter is defined as the (let's say right) focus of the ellipse. If we ...
14
votes
3answers
705 views

Does relativistic mass have weight?

If an object was sliding on an infinitely long friction-less floor on Earth with relativistic speeds (ignoring air resistance), would it exert more vertical weight force on the floor than when it's at ...
0
votes
1answer
159 views

Is the speed of light related to the mass of the universe?

If the mass of the universe were cut in half, would it affect the speed of light? Would it be twice as fast? Would it stay the same? Do we have instruments that are sensitive enough to measure the ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely?

As the title suggests, Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely? I am aware any mass produces and effects gravity but couldn't find ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the mass of a photon moving at the speed of light? [duplicate]

What is the mass of a photon moving at the speed of light? And if it does not have mass, how is it affected by gravity? Also why does Einstein's general relativity support that a gravitational wave ...
2
votes
3answers
276 views

What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Does everything with mass or energy have a gravitational pull?

As small as it may be, does every 'thing' have a gravitational pull? That is, something with mass or energy. No matter how obsolete or negligible it may be, is it there? If so, how is it calculated? ...
3
votes
2answers
146 views

Gravitational distortion of an object's diameter, at a distance,

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are? What is the relationship between the optical distortion and the mass of the objects?
1
vote
1answer
187 views

Is light affect by gravity? Why?

I would like to know if light is affected by gravity, also, I would like to know what is the more correct for the definition of gravity: A force that attracts bodies with mass or force that attracts ...
1
vote
1answer
579 views

Does gravitational force attract bodies with mass or with energy?

On my textbook is written that gravitational force is the force that attracts bodies with mass. But I've seen on a book that It actually attracts bodies with energy. I'm having a class tomorrow and I ...
2
votes
2answers
83 views

Is it part of special relativity that mass possessing energy is more dense?

I was reading http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/hillis/hillis_p2.html and it says that a charged battery weighs more than a dead one or a rotating object weighs more than a stationary one (i.e. mass ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

Photons and Relativity

Consider a Photon from Sun and travels with a velocity $c$. Now think we are that photon. For us, it looks like Sun is moving away from us with a velocity $c$. So, why don't we get attracted back ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the exact gravitational force between two masses including relativistic effects?

I was wondering if there is a closed-form formula for the force between two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ if relativistic effects are included. My understanding is that the classic formula $G \frac{m_1 ...
4
votes
1answer
622 views

Planetary Gravity and its effects

This is my first question on the Physics portion of Stack Exchange. I was hoping to get some light on the topic of gravity. I don't have much background knowledge of physics so I might as well start ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

Does matter with negative mass exist?

Or does it exist mathematically? Is it really inconsistent with a common-sense, mathematics or known physical laws? As far as I understand, if it exists, it must be far away from the "positive" ...
1
vote
1answer
285 views

Is $w=mg$ the right way to calculate mass?

How can you find the mass of an object by using a weight and a gravitational acceleration from another planet then earth? I was given $5.8\text{ N}$ and an acceleration of $4.0\ \mathrm{m/s^2}$. The ...
1
vote
1answer
405 views

What gives matter Gravitational Mass? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does the equivalence between inertial and gravitational mass imply anything about the Higgs mechanism? In Higgs mechanism, Higgs field, which likes syrup, slows down ...
2
votes
2answers
180 views

The physics behind The Great Flood [closed]

The book of Genesis floats (pardon the pun) some interesting numbers when discussing the Great Flood. For example, it rained for 40 days and 40 nights, and at the end of that time, the entire planet ...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

How is light affected by gravity?

Light is clearly affected by gravity, just think about a black hole, but light supposedly has no mass and gravity only affects objects with mass. On the other hand, if light does have mass then ...
1
vote
2answers
446 views

Why is Gravitational force proportional to the masses?.

We know that two mass particles attract each other with a force $$F~=~\frac{G M_1 M_2}{r^2}.$$ But what is the reason behind that? Why does this happen?
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is Higgs Boson given the name “The God Particle”?

Higgs Boson (messenger particle of Higgs field) accounts for inertial mass, not gravitational mass. So, how could it account for formation of universe as we know it today? I think, gravity accounts ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Space station gains enough mass to lose orbit?

I.S.S is constantly being improved (add-ons). Will the space station need to be moved to a higher orbit at some point?
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Neutrino Oscillation and their gravitational implications

As I understand neutrinos, there are three different flavors, all with different masses. Although the masses of these neutrinos have not been directly measured, their mass differences have been. ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
15
votes
2answers
2k views

Does a photon exert a gravitational pull?

I know a photon has zero rest mass, but it does have plenty of energy. Since energy and mass are equivalent does this mean that a photon (or more practically, a light beam) exerts a gravitational pull ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

All matter has a mass but does all matter have a gravitational pull?

I know that all planets and stars have a gravitational pull but does a simple much smaller object have a gravitational pull for example a pebble?
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Increasing mass' effect on the balance between centripetal force and centrifugal force

Okay, this is nothing more than a thought experiment which popped into my head while driving home from work today. Take the case of a single body orbiting another, larger body, as in a planet and a ...
5
votes
3answers
225 views

Could we prove that neutrinos have mass by measuring their gravitational signature?

It is now said that neutrinos have mass. If an object has mass then it also emits a gravitational field. I appreciate the neutrinos mass is predicted to be small, but as there are so many produced ...