6
votes
2answers
62 views

Double decay $\beta\beta$ observation and neutrino mass

If the double decay $\beta\beta$ will be detected this means the neutrino is a Majorana particle coincident with its antiparticle. At the moment the half life of this decay is put to ...
4
votes
3answers
198 views

Majorana Mass For Neutrinos In Standard Model

Neutrinos can't be given Dirac masses because there is no $SU(2)_L$ singlet right handed neutrinos in the standard model. But can neutrinos be given Majorana masses in the standard model? EDIT: Why ...
1
vote
0answers
75 views

Oscillations and Majorana Neutrino

In neutrino oscillations, neutrinos can convert from one flavor to another. This implies individual lepton number is not conserved. Doesn't it also imply that, if the neutrinos have mass, the mass ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

Problem evaluating $C^{-1}M^\dagger C$

How can I show the following? $$\overline{\psi_L}M^\dagger (\psi_L)^c=\overline{\psi_L}CM^\dagger\overline{\psi_L}^T$$ where $\psi^c=C\overline{\psi}^T$ and ...
3
votes
1answer
594 views

Majorana mass vs Dirac Mass

Why is it said that the Dirac mass term conserves the fermion number but the Majorana mass term does not? Can someone explain this mathematically? Which breakdown of symmetry is responsible for ...
5
votes
1answer
114 views

What sorts of complications do massive neutrinos bring to the Standard Model?

Naively, I'd just think of considering them as any other massive fermions (but without electric charge), including the appropriate chiralities (and neutrino-higgs coupling when necessary). ...
5
votes
1answer
656 views

Why is the majorana particle a fermion?

My knowledge of quantum mechanics is rather limited, but what I always understood was that Bosons have integer spins and Fermions have half-integer spins. My question is very simple: the Majorana ...
2
votes
1answer
295 views

Neutrino mass with Dirac and Majorana

Why both Dirac mass and Majorana mass terms are needed to explain the mass of a neutrino?
1
vote
1answer
229 views

How can one know if one has a Majorana fermion?

If the Majorana fermion is a fermion that is it's own antiparticle and exactly the same as its fermion counterpart, then how do they know that it's not just a fermion?