2
votes
1answer
29 views

Why eigenvector points to principal stress plane?

I can represent a tensor by a matrix. Suppose we are talking about a 2nd order tensor, and the matrix is therefore 3x3. If I find one eigenvector of that matrix; that vector represents normal vector ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

How to define tensor contraction without referring to summation?

The textbook defines a tensor to be an element in $(T^*)^k×T^l→R$. It then expresses tensors as arrays of components with respect to a certain basis, and defines tensor contraction using summation ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Terminologies for moment of inertia

Perhaps someone can suggest the right terms for the following mathematical objects related to moment of inertia? A inertia tensor $I$. $$I \equiv \begin{bmatrix} I_{1,1} & I_{1,2} & I_{1,3} ...
5
votes
1answer
229 views

Advanced atomic physics: From Liouville Equations to the Bloch equations

I'm trying to derive the Bloch equations from the Liouville equation. This should be possible according to this paper, where it discusses higher order Bloch equations (second order spherical tensors). ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Second Rank Tensors [duplicate]

I'm a little confused, for the twentieth time, on what tensors are. I thought they were a generalization of matrices-but then they have special transformation rules. I'm looking for a concise ...
0
votes
2answers
418 views

When and how do you represent a two body state as a tensor product?

I have read that in quantum mechanics, compound systems are constructed as tensor products. But on page 177 of Griffith, for example, a two body wavefunction is introduced as Psi ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Writing a tensor with respect to a particular basis

When defining tensors as multilinear maps, I am having trouble understanding why a tensor, let's say of type (2,1), can be written in the following way: $$T = T^{\mu\nu}_{\rho} e_\mu \otimes e_\nu ...
1
vote
1answer
289 views

Tensors: relations between physics and linear algebra

In continuum mechanics we use finite deformation tensors to exprime deformations in a point. The 9 components of the tensor (in reality 6 because of its symmetry) are defined as $$ ...