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2
votes
2answers
38 views

Bending along an axis for strength?

I read about this law / property a couple of months back, but I've forgotten what it's name was and I can't seem to find it by Googling. I was hoping someone could give me the name for this property. ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Laws of physics for a point in cyclical 2D motion

A follow up question to the question in What does the statement "the laws of physics are invariant" mean? and Formal definition of an observer? Which laws of physics are they talking about ...
69
votes
16answers
10k views

Why do most formulas in physics have integer and rational exponents?

I mean, why is $F=ma$? Why not $m^{0.123}$, $a^{1.43}$ or some random non-integers or irrational? I hope you understand that my question isn't limited just to force, energy, velocity, etc.; it also ...
2
votes
3answers
62 views

How to conclude that some correlation does imply causation

I'm trying to prove that all physical THEORIES are just experiments and tests that conduce to assumptions about correlations between causes and results. BUT how physicists conclude that a relationship ...
1
vote
3answers
134 views

How is mass reduced in a normal chemical reaction which releases energy like heat, sound or light?

I was reading this link. Just above the paragraph titled "OTHER CONSERVATION LAWS", it says that "This conversion of mass to energy happens well below the speed of light, in a very small way, when a ...
-4
votes
2answers
126 views

Proving (instead of discovering) the laws of quantum mechanics

A single toss of a fair coin cannot be predicted. But if we observe a large number of tosses, we can prove mathematically the law that roughly half of them will show up heads. The movements of ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Locus of a moving mass point

Two very small mass particles $m_1$, $m_2$ are connected by a $2l$ long, infinitely soft and inelastic thread without mass. The initial condition of the system before being freely released is as in ...
0
votes
5answers
414 views

Why Light and Observers have different laws of physics [closed]

Special relativity states: The speed of light in a vacuum is always $c$, regardless of the velocity of the observer. The laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion. These two ...
0
votes
3answers
64 views

Question on the provability of the physics laws of the Newtonian Mechanic

Why the physical laws like Newton's law of motion can't be proved? Or more specifically: why our Universe follows laws?
4
votes
2answers
90 views

Different equivalent representations for same physics

I want to expand my understanding of physics and just watched a Feynman lecture where he said "every theoretical physicist who is any good knows six or seven different theoretical representations for ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

How do you interpret the product of two components?

I hope this isn't borderline philosophy. It is really difficult for me to articulate the question and so Google was of no use to me. The question spawned when I was learning laws of conservation of ...
2
votes
4answers
770 views

What is fundamentally physically impossible?

Mathematical logic defines quite clearly what is true or false in math, and also that some theorems are impossible to prove. This resulted in some clear definitions of axioms set like Peano, ZF or ...
0
votes
1answer
157 views

If the universe could emerge from nothing, what about physical laws? [closed]

I've watched Lawrence Krauss's lecture and read his book. I think I got what he was saying, and I don't have any problems with that; however, what I can't get is how the laws of physics that makes ...
1
vote
1answer
248 views

How to know if something is a primitive concept, a law, a definition or a theorem

Some basic Physics books are often misguiding in the sense that they don't make clear whether something is a primitive concept, a law, a definition or a theorem. This is often a little confusing. I've ...
-1
votes
2answers
171 views

Inverting the laws of physics [closed]

Are there any good theories on inverting the law of physics? To make physics work the opposite way of what it does. Please ask question if this is unclear! I'll answer as well as I can. Ok, I'll ...
-2
votes
2answers
163 views

Do physics laws really apply to anything? [closed]

My professor said that a law was stated and announced as a law because it happens in our everyday life. He gave us an example of Newton's 3 laws. He said that walking possess 3 laws of Newton's. Is ...
3
votes
3answers
192 views

Evolution principle of the physical laws

I wanted to know if there is a physical theory that considers that the laws of physics undergo an evolutionary process. That see the law of physics or the absence of them, as something dynamic, and ...
4
votes
2answers
213 views

Can we write down a dynamical law of physics which is totally non-deterministic?

In classical mechanics, $F=ma$ tells us how to evolve a system at time $t=t_0$ to $t=t_0+dt$. In quantum mechanics, the Schrodinger equation gives us a similar recipe. These equations are, in a ...
4
votes
3answers
515 views

Aren't all physical relations non-linear?

It is well-known that Hooke's Law is only approximately true and thus that linear relation is merely an idealization not strictly corresponding to the reality. Wouldn't it be necessary/appropriate ...
2
votes
2answers
179 views

How can we claim something violates some physical law, when so many physical laws have been postulated?

For example, Einstein postulated that the speed of light, c, is constant in all inertial frames of reference. Bohr postulated that electrons go around the atom in ...
1
vote
2answers
133 views

Has there been any serious work in how the world would look if basic physical laws were changed?

Has there been any serious work in investigating how the world would look if certain basic physical laws were changed? Like if gravity or electromagnetism laws were changed to have different ...
2
votes
2answers
456 views

Should the term Watt's Law be used?

I'm revising some electrical curriculum for a technical training program. In the curriculum students have to calculate values using Ohm's law and the equation Power = Current * Voltage (or P = IV). ...
7
votes
4answers
292 views

Is energy extensivity necessary in thermodynamics?

Given a partition of a system into two smaller systems, the energy $U$ is devided into $U_1$ and $U_2$, with $$U=\mathcal{P}(U_1,U_2):=U_1+U_2,$$ so that $U_2$ is given by $U-U_1$. Here the ...
6
votes
3answers
701 views

Why didn't Newton just propose the 2nd Law and leave it at that?

Why didn't Newton just propose the 2nd Law ($F=\dot{p}$) and leave it at that? The 2nd Law implicitly contains the first, doesn't it? If so, it seems he wasn't following his own Rule #1 of Book 3 of ...
12
votes
2answers
420 views

Superconductivity reasons (Intutitive)

Superconductivity I read in a book "Physics - Resnik and Halliday" the explanation of Type-I Superconductors{cold ones} that: The Electrons that make up current at super-cool temperatures move in ...
2
votes
1answer
231 views

Laws of physics and general relativity

I'm reading that general relativity let's us describe physics from the point of view of both inertial and accelerated observers. What does that actually mean in terms of doing actual physics? For ...
2
votes
4answers
452 views

Laws of Atomic Theory - how is this possible? [duplicate]

Not sure if this is the right place to post, but how is it possible to have laws of a theory? A theory is not able to be a law, since it's just an explanation that can always be disproven. So how is ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Do the laws of physics work everywhere in the universe?

Do the laws of physics change anywhere in the universe?Or will they change from place to place in the universe?
0
votes
3answers
308 views

Action - Reaction pair, through photons

Here's an example to describe the issue Supossed a high power laser (eg a 100 kW laser, ie, electromagnetic weapons) is fired to a target, then it will receive energy and move. (and likely to burn or ...
1
vote
6answers
360 views

Are the laws of physics applied mathematics? [closed]

This questions started with a question I had about gravity. If two objects of different weights fall to the earth at the same rate of acceleration, then it seems to me that gravity is in some ways ...
4
votes
5answers
866 views

Laws and theories

What is a physical law, a theory, and what is the relationship among them? I know this is a very basic question, so any reference to epistemology will be greatly appreciated :)
12
votes
14answers
27k views

Best (most realistic) physics game? [closed]

Inspired by a similar post, I wanted to know what video games, past or present, most accurately employ the laws of physics. I believe this is an appropriate question for this site, since the users ...
2
votes
3answers
333 views

Why is it thought that normal physics doesn't exist inside the event horizon of a black hole?

A black hole is so dense that a sphere around it called the event horizon has a greater escape velocity than the speed of light, making it black. So why do astronomers think that there is anything ...