World's largest particle accelerator built by the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) near the Franco-Swiss frontier near Geneva, Switzerland. It is designed to collide beams of protons of up to 7 TeV. It contains the important detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb.

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How does LHC explore extra dimensions?

The large hadron collider (LHC) has been smashing particles for a long time and sometimes people say that they have found new dimensions. How is it even possible for a particle accelerator to find new ...
4
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1answer
40 views

LHC: Clumps of protons or continuous stream?

I am curious about the Large Hadron Collider and whether the proton (anti-) beams are clumps of protons (grouped together) or are they roughly equally distributed around the circumference of the ring. ...
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33 views

Estimated total number of Higgs events

How many Higgs events have been observed at the LHC? I understand that this is not terribly well defined question; I'm just after an order of magnitude estimate for the excess events in, let's say, ...
2
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1answer
96 views

What's the recent released 750GeV particle's spin?

I was told that it has recently been confirmed to be spin-2 particle, and potentially to be graviton. I'm pretty interested in how this has been examined. Edit: During the Moriond 2016 conference, ...
2
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0answers
30 views

How correlated are the statistical significances of the same signal/non-signal for CMS and ATLAS?

Consider a diphoton excess for both ATLAS and CMS at the same energy for two cases: false signal: I'd expect the two statistical significances to be uncorrelated true signal: I'd expect the two ...
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0answers
93 views

How does the “Look Else Where Effect” affect the chances of detecting a false diphoton excess at the LHC?

Back in December 2015, there was found a 750 GeV diphoton excess in both CMS and ATLAS at the same location with a significance well above $3\sigma$; a 0.13% chance of being false. However, there ...
3
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1answer
170 views

With the LHC about to restart as max energy, are there absolutely no hints or tantalizing signs of Supersymmetry in previous data?

Over the last couple of years I've seen several articles talk about hints or bumps in the data that might point to Supersymmetry. An article in NewScientist from Summer 2012 discussed the discovery of ...
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88 views

Detecting supersymmetry

What would scientists in particle colliders look for as evidence of supersymmetry?
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107 views

How do I calculate the differential cross section with respect to the transversal momentum?

First of all, sorry for my English, my first language is German. My problem is: I calculated the matrix element of the quark-gluon-Compton process (q+g -> gamma + q). With the kinematics of ...
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54 views

Branching ratio for a bound state

Consider the meson $\Upsilon(10860)$. It decays into $B\bar{B}$, $B\bar{B}^*+cc$ and $B^*\bar{B}^*$. The mass of $B$ is $5.28 ~\textrm{ GeV}$ and mass of $B^*$ is $5.33~\textrm{ GeV}$. The branching ...
2
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1answer
51 views

High $p_T$ and high $Q^2$ in deep inelastic hadronic collisions

When reading about high energy collisions (for example proton-proton collisions at LHC), I always find the relation $Q\sim p_T$, which, for me, is hard to demonstrate. Moreover, I found statements ...
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25 views

How is the decay width of a resonance is measured?

Last December LHC found an excess in the diphoton channel around 750 GeV. Along with number of excess events and cross section for proton proton -> gamma gamma process, they also provided a width for ...
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1answer
57 views

How are the standard model and the Higgs boson actually confirmed experimentally in practice?

This is my mental picture on how we can make predictions from a theory (I'm not a physicist so this might be quite wrong) : Typically, we solve a partial differential equation (analytically if we can,...
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3answers
50 views

Can we observe solar p-p fusion reaction somehow on Earth?

What are the properties of proton+proton fusion reaction $p + p → 2H + e^+ + ν_e + 0.42 MeV$ making it hard to replicate on Earth? If we aim beam of protons to a can of water, won't we observe ...
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4answers
4k views

Why does LIGO do blind data injections but not the LHC?

The LIGO group has a team that periodically produces fake data indicating a possible gravitational wave without informing the analysts. A friend of mine who works on LHC data analysis told me that ...
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1answer
50 views

Why is the tunnel cold in LHC?

Particle accelerators such as the LHC work by accelerating electrons or protons close to the speed of light in opposing directions through an incredibly cold tunnel, until they eventually smash ...
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2answers
58 views

$e^+e^-\to q\bar{q}$: Reconstructing $q\bar{q}$ energy and momentum

Question In a real collider experiment e.g. LHC / LEP how can one reconstruct the energy and momentum of the resultant $q\bar{q}$ pair produced from the process $e^+e^-\to q\bar{q}$? Specifically, ...
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1answer
41 views

How come two protons create top-antitop quark pair? (A question regarding CERN courier May 2016)

I am not very well versed in particle physics lingo but as much as I know $p$ stands for proton and $t$ stands for top-quark. Then, how could this be possible? I hope I am wrong about what is ...
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0answers
63 views

Explanation of graphs from CERN [closed]

I have a few questions about these kinds of graphs What is the name of this type of graph? What does the width of the peak mean? If the points are data points, how was the curve created/predicted? ...
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3answers
4k views

How can an electron fake a jet?

This is a question for experimentalists. I have seen in several ATLAS papers (see for example chapter 4 in arXiv:1602.09058, 6th paragraph), that after objects have been correctly identified, any jet ...
9
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2answers
963 views

What does the data in various stages of analysis from a particle collision look like?

I've been following the news around the work they are doing at the LHC particle accelerator in CERN. I am wondering what the raw data that is used to visualize the collisions looks like. Maybe someone ...
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2answers
91 views

Where all those particles come from - proton proton collision

I was reading an article about the "Higgs factory" China is planning to build and it got me thinking about what happens when two protons collide. I am an engineer so I have a good understanding of ...
6
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1answer
164 views

Why did it take so long to find the Higgs?

The $W$ and $Z$ boson took a long time to be discovered because they were so heavy; we couldn't produce them in a particle collider until the 80's. But the Higgs boson isn't that much heavier than the ...
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1answer
72 views

How are the protons for collisions in the LHC made?

I heard that the LHC smashes two protons together to research the universe. But how does it create the protons for collision? If we strip off the electrons won't there be neutrons along with protons? ...
3
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1answer
68 views

In the LHC, how is the proton separated from the electron in the hydrogen? [duplicate]

I know that we use protons in the LHC. So my question is, how is the proton separated from the electron in the hydrogen?
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39 views

Why do Higgs decays depend on the production method?

I'm reading about Higgs phenomenology and I have come across the following table. I don't see why gluon fusion to $b \bar{b}$ is considered to be "impossible" in this table. As far as I can tell, ...
3
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1answer
126 views

How the LHC bump can be a mere coincidence?

Speaking of http://www.nature.com/news/lhc-sees-hint-of-boson-heavier-than-higgs-1.19036. I understand that such a bump can be a statistical fluctuation. What troubles me is that the bump has been ...
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2answers
4k views

Relativistic centripetal force

The thought randomly occurred to me that a circular particle accelerator would have to exert a lot of force in order to maintain the curvature of the trajectory. Many accelerators move particles at ...
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7answers
2k views

What would happen if you put your hand in front of the 7 TeV beam at LHC?

Some speculation here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NMqPT6oKJ8 Is there a possibility it would pass 'undetected' through your hand, or is it certain death? Can you conclude it to be vital, or ...
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0answers
19 views

Parent particles. Production modes of hyperon $\Lambda$

In the PDG are listed the decay modes of the known particles. I wonder if there exist lists with the production modes of particles. It is, lists with all the possible parent particles that decay into ...
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0answers
35 views

Proton-Proton collision [duplicate]

How are the people at CERN able to exactly collide protons head on? What about the HUP? Do they accelerate many particles and smash them so that at least some of them collide head on?
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0answers
14 views

What is the meaning of the minimum separation requirement?

In this work, BHsearch done by CMS, they reconstructed and identified objects using certain conditions. And finally, in Page 3, the last paragraph requires that the minimum separation between any two ...
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1answer
108 views

Collision symmetry and measuring the asymmetry in the Drell-Yan process

I saw a talk the other day about an asymmetry in the Drell-Yan process caused by CP-violation: Apparently one way this can be measured (ATLAS is doing this) is to collide protons and observe the ...
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28 views

How does a Collider work? [closed]

How does a collider work, explained using various Physics theories (or if there is a main one) . How does the acceleration play a part in the individual sub-atomic kinetic levels. What happens when ...
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2answers
3k views

Can the technology behind Particle accelerators can be used for space propulsion?

As I understand, the kinetic energy of the proton beam in a hadron collider is quite large. Can you build a space propulsion system that is based on accelerating a proton bean to relativistic speeds ...
2
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0answers
68 views

Effective collision energy at LHC

The proton is not a fundamental particle, so in high energy proton-proton collision we actually collide proton's sub-constituents: quark-quark and (mostly) gluon-gluon. LHC operates now at 13 TeV ...
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4answers
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Why is 7 TeV considered as a big amount of energy?

Considering that $7$ TeV is more or less the same kinetic energy as a mosquito flying, why is it considered to be a great amount of energy at the LHC? I mean, a giant particle accelerator that can ...
17
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2answers
976 views

Correlation between outstanding hints in experimental particle physics

The 115 GeV ATLAS Higgs with enhanced diphoton decays has gone away but there are several other recent tantalizing hints relevant for particle physics, namely CoGeNT's 7-8 GeV dark matter particle ...
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1answer
92 views

Could the Large Hadron Collider accelerate one kilogram of protons at once?

Is it possible to accelerate a very large number of protons in a particle accelerator as opposed to only a few as is regularly done? What's to keep someone from accidentally dumping too many particles ...
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1answer
71 views

Head on collision of two black holes

LHC was built to collide two atomic particles to study contents within them. There are millions and billions of black holes present throughout galaxies. As collision between the galaxies is common in ...
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5answers
179 views

The use of electrons in synchrotrons

I'm researching synchrotrons for a class project, but I can't seem to find a decent answer to one of my questions. It appears that most synchrotrons use electrons as opposed to some other charged ...
3
votes
1answer
255 views

How far could the LHC “fire” a proton into space if we (outside LHC) ignore all interactions but gravity?

Very simple question, and frankly quite a silly one, but I'm currently writing a lecture for secondary school kids and I'd love to tell them how far the Large Hadron Collider could fire a proton. The ...
3
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1answer
81 views

How are the two proton beams at the LHC accelerated in opposite directions?

At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), how are the protons in the two beams accelerated in opposite directions?
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3answers
149 views

New particles found using the LHC

After finding the Higgs boson in 2012, CERN. What did the CERN found recently using the large Hadron Collider?
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46 views

How much damage do high energy experiments impose on the LHC detection equipment?

I do appreciate that I am second guessing lots of experts who have already considered this aspect of high energy experimentation, but I have not seen a similar question, my apologies if I missed a ...
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0answers
64 views

Does this phrase in “Knocking On Heaven's Door”, refer to gravitons?

This is an extract from Knocking On Heaven's Door, by Randall (2011) The suprising fact is that if you have a stable particle whose mass corresponds to the weak energy scale that the LHC will ...
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1answer
305 views

The (relativistic) mass of a proton in the LHC

What would be the (relativistic) mass of a proton, in grams, as it is traveling at the maximum possible speed in the LHC?
3
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1answer
72 views

Precise definition of Jet Energy Scale and Jet Energy Resolution

I've been struggling to get the precise meaning of these two quantities, is it correct to say that the first one is only related to Montecarlo simulations? I can't seem to find a pedagogical ...
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0answers
115 views

Large Hadron Collider 2015 upgrade, what may we discover?

I realise that the initial answer to my question that may come to mind is, "we don't know yet, obviously" But my question is hopefully not opinion based. For example, does this upgrade have a ...
9
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2answers
927 views

ATLAS and CMS calorimeters

I was reading this interesting recent review on arXiv about particle identification: "Particle Identification" by Christian Lippmann (2011), arXiv:1101.3276 In figure 2, there is an interesting ...