World's largest particle accelerator built by the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) near the Franco-Swiss frontier near Geneva, Switzerland. It is designed to collide beams of protons of up to 7 TeV. It contains the important detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb.

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Correlation between outstanding hints in experimental particle physics

The 115 GeV ATLAS Higgs with enhanced diphoton decays has gone away but there are several other recent tantalizing hints relevant for particle physics, namely CoGeNT's 7-8 GeV dark matter particle ...
7
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742 views

How many $fb^{-1}$ for the most likely $5\sigma$ 115 Gev Higgs at the 7 Tev LHC?

How many $fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at the 7 Tev LHC do physicists expect are needed, to make a $5\sigma$ discovery of the most likey 115 Gev Higgs, if it exists?
7
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2answers
252 views

What are the main differences between $p p$ and $p \bar p$ colliders

I know that it is somehow related to the parton distribution functions, allowing specific reactions with gluons instead of quarks and anti-quarks, but I would really appreciate more detailed answers ! ...
5
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414 views

What does the LHC do afterwards?

Astronomical telescopes are now mega projects and cost $1Bn and although they are pitched to solve the current interest of the day they are general purpose machines and with upgrades and new ...
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What are the AFS values in the Atlas experiment?

If you go to the Atlas experiment http://atlas.ch/ and click the status button, there's an AFS reading at the bottom with a current value 50ns_228b+1small_214_12_180_36bpi_8inj The 50ns seems to ...
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Hawking's alternative to Higgs Boson

I have seen in popular media, claims that Hawking does not believe the Higgs boson exists due to microscopic black holes and even made a bet against it. This is based on something published in ...
7
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1answer
404 views

Decay of SUSY particles

In discussion of LHC searches for SUSY particles, physicists seem to assume they will decay quickly to the lightest SUSY particle which then remains stable (at least within the time it takes to leave ...
8
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2answers
818 views

What if LHC finds SUSY?

Here and on many other forums and blogs people ask the question "What if LHC does not find SUSY?". I would like to ask the opposite. What if it finds it? What would the implications be? Is it going to ...
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What if the LHC doesn't see SUSY?

A question in four parts. What are the main problems which supersymmetry purports to solve? What would constitute lack of evidence for SUSY at the proposed LHC energy scales (e.g. certain predicted ...
6
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1answer
329 views

LHC Big Bang Temperatures

It's been claimed that the LHC's 14 TeV energy produces temperatures comparable to that which occurred very soon after the Big Bang. The well-known $E=1.5kT$ formula from classical statistical ...
2
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1answer
324 views

With estimates of mass constraints on magnetic monopoles, how likely is one to be found by the LHC(MoEDAL)?

Fermilab seems to have ruled out monopoles with mass less than 850 GeV, but I have seen some estimates of the mass thought to be in the order of up to $10^{18}$ GeV, which, of course, would make them ...
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420 views

Will negatively charged strangelets be produced by the LHC?

Witten (and earlier, Bodner) hypothesized that strange matter (up, down, strange quarks) should be more stable than "regular" nuclear matter(The strange matter hypothesis). That is that the typical ...
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ATLAS and CMS calorimeters

I was reading this interesting recent review on arxiv about particle identification: Particle Identification In figure 2, there is an interesting comparison between the CMS and ATLAS calorimeter ...
10
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7answers
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What would happen if you put your hand in front of the 7 TeV beam at LHC?

Some speculation here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NMqPT6oKJ8 Is there a possibility it would pass 'undetected' through your hand, or is it certain death? Can you conclude it to be vital, or ...
6
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1answer
325 views

Unusual particle effects at CERN

In 2010 there were press reports that CERN had identified unusual properties in particle behavour in collisions. One link here. Here is a partial quote: "In some sense, it's like the particles talk ...
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1answer
275 views

What is jet quenching and how far can the hydrodynamic analogy go?

I recently heard about jet quenching concerning data taken by the experiments at the LHC. Apparently it is related to the existence to the quark-gluon plasma. As far as I understood this ...
6
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2answers
317 views

How relevant is LHC to quantum gravity?

Premise: the LHC is obviously mapping unseen territory in high energies, and therefore it's always possible to imagine far out results. Excluding completely unexpected outcomes - is the LHC ...
5
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1answer
817 views

Advantages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions over proton-proton collisions?

Some high-energy experiments (RHIC, LHC) use ion-ion collisions instead of proton-proton collisions. Although the total center-of-mass energy is indeed higher than p-p collisions, it might happen that ...
2
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3answers
508 views

What does it mean a temperature of billions of degrees?

I read a few days ago that in the LHC temperatures of billions of degrees were achieved. I'm curious to know what does it really mean such a temperature? The concept of temperature is easy to grasp ...
7
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3answers
433 views

Particle colliders: why do they need an accelerator chain

Particle colliders like the LHC or the Tevatron use a complex accelerator chain to have particles at a given energy before being accelerated. For example: The CERN accelerator complex to inject in ...
17
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2answers
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If the LHC doesn't find the Higgs Boson, what would be the implications for the Standard Model?

What would be the implications to the Standard Model if the Higgs Boson hadn't been found with the LHC? Also, if the Higgs Boson had not been found with the LHC, would it have been successfully ...
10
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4answers
1k views

Why is the LHC circular and 27km long?

The LHC in Geneva is a circular accelerator, 27 km long, why is it like that ?