World's largest particle accelerator built by the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) near the Franco-Swiss frontier near Geneva, Switzerland. It is designed to collide beams of protons of up to 7 TeV. It contains the important detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb.

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Convolving Parton Distribution Functions

I have the cross-sections as a function of $\sqrt{s}$ for a process with a $u$-quark and $u$-antiquark in the initial state (eg.: $u \bar{u} \to e^- e^+$). I have a standard parton distribution ...
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2answers
102 views

Do the proton PDFs change much with Q?

Specifically, the second moments, do they change much from say 100 to 1000 GeV? Why or why not?
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89 views

What are the implications if Supersting theory is discredited? [duplicate]

Please forgive my ignorance, I am not a student of physics in any capacity, therefor my understanding of string theory is extremely limited to say the least. Based on the recent lack of evidence in ...
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3answers
20k views

What is the current status of string theory (2013)?

I've seen a bunch of articles talking about how new findings from the LHC seem to disprove (super)string theory and/or supersymmetry, or at least force physicists to reformulate them and change ...
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6answers
2k views

What would happen if Large Hadron Collider would collide electrons?

After some reading about the Large Hadron Collider and it's very impressive instruments to detect and investigate the collision results, there is a remaining question. What would happen if the ...
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1answer
265 views

How much does a proton weigh when it is going around the LHC at CERN?

Considering that speed increases weight and the proton is going at almost the speed of light, I would like to know how much a speeding proton would weigh in the LHC.
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204 views

What is the 'bump' near $M_{\mu\mu}\approx 30\text{ GeV}$

In this (attached) Summer 2011 plot from CMS (twiki page), they have a plot of the dimuon invariant mass spectrum across 3 orders of magnitude in energy. There seems to be a 'bump' near ...
2
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1answer
223 views

Impact of LHC on other science and technologies, in particular on mathematics?

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) "remains one of the largest and most complex experimental facilities ever built" (Wikipedia); it may even be the most complex project in humankind's history (?). Such ...
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2answers
272 views

Assuming that extra dimensions will not be visible at LHC, what motivation will still remain to study them?

Many physicists believe that there is little possibility of observing extra dimensions at LHC so that some extra dimension models originally designed to solve hierarchy problem (ADD/Randall-Sundrum) ...
4
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1answer
140 views

Will Randall-Sundrum extra dimension scenario become defunct if not supported by LHC?

The Randall-Sundrum extra dimension scenario had been one of the most extensively studied class of theories. This offered a solution to the hierarchy problem. However, if this picture is not supported ...
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1answer
235 views

Which SUSY models are affected by the recent LHCb result?

The LHCb has recently published the observation of $B_s \rightarrow \mu^+ \mu^-$ with a branching ratio that agrees with the Standard Model (SM). There are many blog posts about it (See: Of Particular ...
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2answers
569 views

What would happen to a person that was inside the Large Hadron Collider when it is turned on? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What would happen if you put your hand in front of the 7 TeV beam at LHC? Not a terribly scientific question, but one that I'm sure many people have thought about :)
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444 views

What does the latest $B_s^0\rightarrow \mu^+\mu^-$ results mean for SUSY?

A paper from the LHCb collaboration just came out last week, stating basically that the $B_s^0\rightarrow\mu^+\mu^-$ decay matches standard model predictions, and people are already shouting that SUSY ...
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2answers
1k views

Could we use particle colliders as fusion generators?

So I know the basic gist is that fusion power's main issue is sustaining the fusion. I also know that there are two methods. The Torus method and the laser method. The torus magnetically contains ...
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2answers
593 views

Missing transverse energy, exact definition

This might seem basic, but it is a bit confusing. You hear about missing transverse energy a lot in SUSY searches due to the LSP which cannot be detected. Let's say I have the 4-vector for the LSP. ...
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466 views

Are there experiments that are banned from being done at the LHC?

Are there experiments that are banned from being done at the LHC because they are too dangerous?
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6answers
327 views

Why not using cosmic rays to study HEP, since they are way more energetic than LHC?

Cosmic rays energies can exceed $10^{8}$ TeV, way higher than the energy scale achieved in the LHC or that can be achieved in the near future. cannot we just use them to study fundamental ...
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0answers
505 views

What is the relationship between Luminosity, Intensity, and Flux?

I am always confused by the terminology: In high energy particle scattering, and in particular, in the context of collider physics, what is the relationship between luminosity, intensity and flux? ...
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2answers
330 views

Some very basic questions on the Higgs Boson

What exactly is a boson? Is the Higgs boson the cause of gravity or a result of it? Does the collision of particles at the LHC create a gravity field or waves or somehow interact with the gravity ...
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2answers
142 views

Shouldn't LHC have used $p\bar{p}$ collisions, instead of $pp$ collisions, to study baryogenesis?

Baryogenesis is the physical process(es) that produced baryon antibaryon asymmetry in the early universe. That means, the laws that governed the bigbang was baryon-antibaryon symmetric. On the other ...
2
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1answer
92 views

random triggers

I understand that a small proportion of events at the LHC that would not trigger on any deterministic trigger are saved on what might be called a random trigger, so that, amongst other uses, proposed ...
2
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1answer
1k views

What's next after Higgs Boson discovery? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Practical matter of the Higgs-Mechanism As everybody knows that the Higgs Boson was discovered on July 4th,2012, I am so curious about it. What are the possible ...
8
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1answer
319 views

What if the 126 GeV particle found at LHC that LOOKS like the Higgs is actually not the Higgs Boson?

I am suspicious of the Higgs announcement. Press mania aside, the scientists seem careful to say only that "we've found something which looks like the Higgs Boson". The difference between ...
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2answers
240 views

What will be the goal of (V)LHC after receiving upgrades?

If I understood correctly, the LHC will be shut down at the end of 2012 to prepare for the full-power, 14 TeV collisions in 2014. I also remember reading about a proposed luminosity upgrade some time ...
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1answer
128 views

Do protons in the beam on LHC interact with photons?

Do protons in the beam on LHC interact with photons? I wonder how a beam would look from outside. Is there a photo of a proton beam?
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2answers
164 views

From where this number of 14 Tev has arised for proton-proton head on collision in LHC?

I am interested in finding out, why are collisions at 14TeV done in the LHC, instead of some other energy?
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1answer
96 views

The Large Hadron Collider produce material residues?

In the LHC particles are accelerated until they collide, producing energy and this make new particles. My question is what happened after this. What happened to new particles and to old particles ...
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2answers
208 views

Batting averages of the Large Hadron Collider

As I understand it, the Large Hadron Collider's function is to throw particles into each other while avoiding hitting the nucleus? If quantum mechanics dictate the position of a particle can only ...
3
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1answer
122 views

Sources for new experimental limits on susy models?

I know the LHC people are publishing new limits every now and then, but as a non-expert in reading experimental papers (yet), I was wondering if there's a friendly website that collects and presents ...
4
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1answer
139 views

Are old fashion photomultipliers used in LHC experiments?

Are any photomultipliers used in any of LHC detectors? Or are only semiconductor devices used? If yes, then where?
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3answers
400 views

How do they handle energy in magnets at LHC?

I'm guessing that when the LHC ramps up to 4000 GeV this means they are increasing the current in the superconducting magnets as RF fields accelerate the beams. Where does this current go when they ...
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2answers
661 views

Can black holes be created on a miniature scale?

A black hole is so powerful to suck everything into itself. So is it possible that mini black holes can be created? If not then we could have actively disproved the rumors spread during LHC ...
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1answer
354 views
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3answers
2k views

Can the technology behind Particle accelerators can be used for space propulsion?

As I understand, the kinetic energy of the proton beam in a hadron collider is quite large. Can you build a space propulsion system that is based on accelerating a proton bean to relativistic speeds ...
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2answers
2k views

Relativistic centripetal force

The thought randomly occurred to me that a circular particle accelerator would have to exert a lot of force in order to maintain the curvature of the trajectory. Many accelerators move particles at ...
4
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1answer
702 views
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688 views

What are the advantages of the ILC over the LHC?

USA Today has an article on Japan's interest as the site for the $10 billion future International Linear Collider. This accelerator will utilize electron/positron collisions (like CERN's former LEP ...
6
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1answer
297 views

Which collision energy at LHC is better for hunting 125 GeV Higgs, 7 TeV, 8 TeV or 14 TeV?

Increasing collision energy in hadron collders doesn't always improve the abiilty to hunt down the Higgs. I know that if the Higgs mass is just above LEP exclusion, then even 7 TeV is too high to be ...
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1answer
156 views

Why search for theoretical particle? [closed]

Just out of curiosity, is there any special purpose in human life, the search for some theoretical particle for its uncertain benefit, to prove theory of everything which doesn't serve any advancement ...
6
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2answers
170 views

How should one combine the uncertainties from the ATLAS and CMS measurements?

First off, a naive theorist question - How are measurements divided between the different detectors at the LHC? I would imagine that for a short run time, say, the CMS detector is active and all the ...
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1answer
808 views

What's the Standard Model width of a 125 GeV Higgs?

There's a fairly broad mass spread in the new results out of Atlas and CMS. I'm curious how this fits with the expected SM width.
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1answer
193 views

Are there any models for two light Higgs?

The LHC results today seem to have two possible Higgs peaks, one at 119 GeV and the other at 125-126 GeV. All the multi-Higgs supersymmetry models I've seen that have multiple Higgs have only one ...
3
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0answers
319 views

How to integrate over rapidity for Parton Luminosities in LHC?

I want to make a comparison of parton luminosities between Tevatron and LHC. According to Factorization theorem the cross section in hadron colliders, as long as the partonic cross section has $\hat ...
5
votes
1answer
257 views

Inelastic nucleon-nucleon cross section at LHC energies

I am trying to reproduce the number of participants $N_{part}$ in Pb-Pb Collisions at LHC using a Glauber Monte Carlo simulation, specifically aiming to reproduce the values given in Phys. Rev. Lett. ...
2
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2answers
432 views

If LHC is the most powerful microscope in the world, what does it magnify?

Some experts (and non experts) have called LHC the most powerful microscope in the world. I am wondering, what does the LHC magnify? Or is calling it a microscope just wrong and misleading?
3
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3answers
304 views

How much would the LHC beam be attenuated by the atmosphere?

As I understand it, the completed Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will ultimately have a proton beam with $2,808$ bunches of $1.15 \times 10^{11}$ protons each at $7$ TeV, giving a total beam energy of ...
3
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1answer
1k views

what is an inverse femto barn?

I came across the use of the unit barn and inverse barn while reading about the operation of LHC. What is an inverse femtobarn ? What does it tell about the experiment being described ?
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2answers
671 views

What does the data in various stages of analysis from a particle collision look like?

I've been following the news around the work they are doing at the LHC particle accelerator in CERN. I am wondering what the raw data that is used to visualize the collisions looks like. Maybe someone ...
2
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2answers
283 views

Might the LHC see nothing new at all?

There's no guarantee that supersymmetry (or more exotic new physics) will be seen at the LHC. Meanwhile, it's standard lore that a Higgsless standard model becomes nonunitary somewhere in the vicinity ...
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2answers
465 views

Particle Accelerator Energy and Luminosity

Both beam energy and luminosity are important for succesful particle accelerator experiments. The LHC's nominal design is for 7 TeV beams and 1E34 cm^-2 sec^-1 luminosity, while the SSC's nominal ...