For questions involving the Lagrangian formulation of a dynamical system. Namely, the application of an action principle to a suitably chosen Lagrangian or Lagrangian Density in order to obtain the equations of motion of the system.

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Lagrangian for small oscillations

For a double pendulum we can consider 2 generalised coordinates $\theta_1$ (angle between first mass and vertical axis) and $\theta_2$ (angle between second mass and vertical axis). The Lagrangian to ...
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1answer
48 views

Lagrangian formalism (demonstration)

My question is about the multiplicity of the Lagrangian to a Physics system. I pretend to demonstrate the following proposition: For a system with $n$ degrees of freedom, written by the ...
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1answer
54 views

Is it possible to formulate a Hamiltonian for a damped system?

I recently found out that it is possible to formulate a Hamiltonian for a system with time-dependent coordinates such that the Hamiltonian is not the same as the energy When is the Hamiltonian of a ...
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1answer
50 views

Lagrangian formalism application on a particle falling system with air resistance

I have this problem, with a first-step resolution: $$...$$ So, I just don't know why they put the term $\frac{\partial F}{\partial \dot{z}}$ in Euler-Lagrange's equations. Why? I know that the ...
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2answers
61 views

Scalar and vector defined by transformation properties

In Classical Mechanics, we are defining scalars as objects that are invariant under any coordinate transformation. Vectors are defined as objects that can be transformed by some transformation matrix ...
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1answer
61 views

What is a point transformation?

This problem comes from Goldstein. What does $s=e^{\gamma t}q$ mean? Do I just put $q=e^{-\gamma t}s$ into the Lagrangian? But I don't know what that means. I think the point transformation may ...
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2answers
175 views

Adding a total time derivative term to the Lagrangian

This is proof that $L'$ represents same equation of motion with $L$ through Lagrange eq. I understand $L'$ satisfies Lagrange eq, but how does this proof mean $L'$ and $L$ describe same motion of ...
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1answer
56 views

Oscillation of a vertical rod supported by horizontal spring [closed]

The system seems to oscillate with $\omega = \sqrt{\frac{\frac{3}{2}mgl + 3k a^2}{ml^2}}$ for small angle $\theta$, and in particular for whatever stiffness $k$ chosen relative to gravitational ...
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1answer
61 views

What is the phase of a gauge coupling?

We typically take gauge couplings to be real and positive. Why do we impose these two conditions? I assume this is a requirement because gauge theories without positive couplings are unphysical or is ...
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39 views

Translation of the Mechanique analytique [closed]

Is there an English translation of the Mechanique analytique by Lagrange that is free? I have tried searching up online, however I only get French originals. The English translations seem all to be ...
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2answers
122 views

An inconsistency in Hamiltonian formulation for non-local Lagrangian: what am I doing wrong?

This question is based on a previous question I asked, Q. [1] In this question, I proposed an example of a non-local Lagrangian (functional), I'm revisiting it here: $$\mathbb{L}=\frac{1}{2}\int^t_0 ...
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1answer
128 views

Legendre transform for non-local Lagrangians, or Hamiltonian of non-local Lagrangian and their properties

This is sort of a multi-part question, mostly dealing with how to treat non-local Hamiltonians and how the corresponding properties of Hamiltonians work in a non-local framework. I proposed an example ...
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1answer
45 views

Metric in Lagrangian and the minimum total potential energy principle

I was wondering why physical systems "like" to go to the minimum of potential energy and I found this question, that tries to justify the minumum total potential energy principle. I was also reading ...
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1answer
71 views

Potential Energy in modified Atwood Machine

The initial length of the spring is $l_0$. I need help understanding how the potential energy of this system comes to be. I know the answer: $$ U = ...
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1answer
64 views

What is the function type of the generalized momentum?

Let $$L:{\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}\to {\mathbb R}$$ denote the Lagrangian (it should be differentiable) of a classical system with $n$ spatial coordinates. In the action ...
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1answer
32 views

A question on the functional dependence of the Lagrangian density

I understand that in classical mechanics the state of a particle at a given instant in time is given by its position $q$ and its velocity at that point $\dot{q}$, and given that, for any given point ...
2
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1answer
68 views

In general, can a Lagrangian density depend on space-time explicitly?

In an exercise on classical field theories, I'm trying to derive the general formula of the Energy-momentum tensor. According to the formula in the lecture notes, this tensor includes a term of minus ...
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1answer
50 views

How to calculate the Hamiltonian from the Lagrangian for a non-relativistic charged point particle in an EM field?

I was given the equation of the Lagrangian: \begin{equation} L~=~\frac{1}{2}m \dot{x}^2+\frac{e}{c}\vec{\dot{x}}\cdot \vec{A}(\vec{x},t)-e\phi (\vec{x},t). \end{equation} I proceeded to use the ...
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1answer
53 views

Lagrange equation and a force derivable from a generalized potential

I was reading the solution of this exercise and I have a doubt: A point particle moves in space under the influence of a force derivable from a generalized potential of the form $$U(r,v) = ...
2
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1answer
47 views

Full time derivative of the Frank-Oseen energy. Mathematical problem

I am studying liquid crystal theory with the book Kleman, Lavrentovich, Soft Matter Physics. In the Ericksen-Leslie theory, Frank-Oseen energy density is: $$ f=0.5*(K_1*div^2 (n)+K_2 ...
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1answer
135 views

Calculus of variations and string theory

In Polchinski's String theory book, Vol 1., in chapter 1, p. 18, he is deriving the Lagrangian in the light cone gauge (that's not necessary to know in order to answer this question), and he gets ...
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1answer
40 views

Under what cases is the Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) operator nilpotent?

It is understood that when we deal with gauge algebras which close on-shell only after using equations of motion or where the space-time is curved, we can no longer just do away with BRST ...
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2answers
184 views

Kepler's Laws to Determine Radius of Circular Orbit

"In nonrelativistic limit of general relativity there is a correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential energy $−h/r^3$ with $h = αL^2/(mc)^2$, where $c$ is the speed of light, $α = GMm$ ...
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1answer
52 views

Show $\frac{\partial T}{\partial \dot q_j} = m_i \dot r_i^T\frac{\dot r_i }{\partial \dot q_j} $ [closed]

This is a basic result in lagrangian mecanics. Let $T$ be the kinetic energy, $r_i$ be the position of the $i^{th}$ particle in the system I need to show $$\frac{\partial T}{\partial \dot q_j} = ...
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1answer
82 views

Lagrangian vector field expression

The Lagrangian vector field $X_L$ on the tangent bundle is given in page 4 of Marco Mazzucchelli's "critical Point Theory for Lagrangian systems" to be; \begin{equation} ...
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1answer
154 views

Solve hanging rope question by using Lagrangian density [closed]

for this one, I can only do the first(a) $$V_{total}=\frac{mg}{l} \int_{x_0}^{d-x_0}{y(x)\sqrt{1+(\frac{dy(x)}{dx})^2}}dx$$ and have no idea about others.
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59 views

The principle of least action [duplicate]

I have read about the principle of least action. This principle suggests that nature would allow a particle to travel in a path along which the integral of the difference between kinetic energy and ...
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1answer
56 views

Showing time-invariance of Lagrangian with time-displacement operator

I am trying to show that the time-invariance of the Lagrangian of a simple one-particle system implies energy conservation for that system. The first step is, well, to show that the Lagrangian is ...
2
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2answers
120 views

Hamiltonian from a Lagrangian with constraints?

Let's say I have the Lagrangian: $$L=T-V.$$ Along with the constraint that $$f\equiv f(\vec q,t)=0.$$ We can then write: $$L'=T-V+\lambda f. $$ What is my Hamiltonian now? Is it $$H'=\dot q_i p_i ...
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1answer
55 views

Dissipated Energy from Falling Object using Lagrangian [closed]

A plate of mass $M$ moves horizontally with initial speed $v$ on a frictionless table. An object of mass $m$ is dropped vertically onto it from the height $h$ and smashes. How much energy is ...
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1answer
61 views

Euclidean classical action

This is the Euclidean classical action $S_{cl}[\phi]=\int d^{4}x\ (\frac{1}{2}(\partial_{\mu}\phi)^{2}+U(\phi))$. It would be nice if somebody could explain the structure of the potential. I don't ...
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1answer
148 views

Gravity in $d$ spacetime dimensions

Given the following action $$S=\frac{1}{16\pi G}\int d^4x \sqrt {-g}(R+aR^2+bR_{\mu\nu}R^{\mu\nu}+cR_{\mu\nu\lambda\sigma}R^{\mu\nu\lambda\sigma}),$$ which is in 4D. How to we generalise this ...
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Does the additivity property of Integrals of motion and Lagrangians valid in all situations?

I would like to know if the additivity property of an integral (constant) of motion valid in all situations ? It works for energy but does it work for all other integrals of motion in all kinds of ...
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1answer
36 views

How to prove that the nonlinear completion of free massless spin-2 action must be Einstein-Hilbert action?

There is a saying that the nonlinear completion of free massless spin-2 action in Minkovski spacetime (that is Fierz-Pauli action) must be Einstein-Hilbert action up to Lovelock invariants. I find a ...
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1answer
65 views

Non-linearity and self-coupling of gravity

I have heard that non-linearity of Einstein's field equations has to do with the fact that gravity self-couples. What does non-linearity have to do with self-coupling?
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1answer
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Degrees of freedom in double Atwood machine?

Why the degree of freedom in double Atwood machine (one block on one side and a pulley with one block in its each side on other side) is 2 and not 1? According to the formula $s=3*n-m$; where ...
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44 views

Terminal conditions and boundary terms in Lagrangian formulations: what do different choices mean?

For the sake of having compact expressions: $$ \left\langle f,g\right\rangle=\int^T_0 f(t)g(t)\,\text{d}t $$ Given some functional: $$ F=\frac{1}{2}m\!\left\langle ...
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1answer
55 views

Euler-Lagrange equation with torsion, question on derivatives

Consider a mechanical system, the Lagrangian of which is: $$-L(u,\dot u)=\int\left(\dfrac{\partial^2 u}{\partial x^2}\right)^2\mathrm{d}x$$ This would correspond to a system in torsion, for example. ...
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1answer
61 views

Definition of the Lagrangian for a relativistic point particle in curved space

I have read that the Lagrangian in GR is defined as $L=\frac{\mathrm{d}s}{\mathrm{d}u}$, where $\mathrm{d}s = g_{ab}\mathrm{d}x^a\mathrm{d}x^b$ is the line element with the metric tensor $g_ab$ and ...
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1answer
37 views

Is there a sensible fully-discretized Hamilton's principle?

In computational physics it is common to formulate Hamilton's principle in a semi-discrete way, where space is continuous but time is discrete: in other words the Lagrangian $$L(q, \dot q, t): ...
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2answers
178 views

Electric current $j^{\mu}$ in standard QED vs. scalar QED

The expression for the 4-current $j^{\mu}$ in standard QED is $$ e\bar{\Psi}\gamma^\mu\Psi $$ and $$ \frac{e}{2 i}(\psi^\dagger D^\mu \psi - (D^\mu \psi)^\dagger \psi) $$ in scalar QED. I ...
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0answers
122 views

Non-conservative Derivation of Lagrangian [closed]

I was previously led to a recent paper by a SE member that did an alternative derivation of the Lagrangian as an initial value problem with two paths rather than the traditional boundary value method. ...
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38 views

Recommendation about higher derivative theory

Are there some textbook or review about following parts of higher derivative Lagrangian? How to figure out the degrees of freedom of higher derivative theory? How to analyse the stability of a ...
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1answer
47 views

Does invariance under infinite small transformation imply invariance to the finite one?

Let's say that I have finite chiral transform and I would like to show invariance of Dirac's Lagrangian when $m=0$ under it. The chiral transform is defined as: $$\psi(x) \rightarrow \psi'(x) =e^{i ...
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1answer
56 views

Independence of position and velocity in Lagrangian from the point of view of physics?

I would like to continue discussion from my previous post on time dependence of lagrangian Time dependence of the Lagrangian of a free particle?. I have also read this old post Why does calculus of ...
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1answer
57 views

2D square lattice, nearest neighbor and next-nearest connected by springs

For my field theory class I am trying to build the Lagrangian for the following system. Consider a 2D square lattice where the nearest and next-nearest neighbor interactions are modeled by springs ...
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29 views

In the Standard Model Lagrangian, why does every term's mass dimension have to be less than four?

In the Standard Model Lagrangian, why does every term's mass dimension have to be less than four? I know that the Lagrangian has to be renormalizable, I guess my question then translates into why ...
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2answers
48 views

Pendulum point in polar coordinates for Lagrangian

So I'm really stumped with this. I have a particle in a cone, like pictured. The particle orbits the z axis on the dotted line for $r$. So knowing that $\alpha$ and $r$ remain constant in this ...
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2answers
124 views

Hamiltonian mechanics really useful for numerical integration? Lagrangian can become 1st-order

(I'm talking about the classical mechanics.) Many texts say that Euler-Lagrange equations are difficult to treat numerically because they are second-order ODEs, ${f_i(\boldsymbol{q, \dot{q}, ...
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2answers
36 views

How to define conserved charges in Euclidean field theory?

In a field theory with signature (1,d), conserved charges are obtained by integrating the time component of a conserved current over a spatial region. What are the corresponding equations and ...