Jerk is the third derivative of displacement with respect to time. It is also the derivative of acceleration with respect to time.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

9
votes
5answers
333 views

What is the best path for a given initial and final state?

I am trying to calculate an efficient acceleration curve given starting and final positions and velocities. I'm assuming no friction, and that the acceleration can be applied in any direction at any ...
8
votes
1answer
247 views

When motion begins, do objects go through an infinite number of position derivatives?

This might be a very vague and unclear question, but let me explain. When an object at rest moves, or moves from point $A$ to point $B$, we know the object must have had some velocity (1st derivative ...
1
vote
2answers
171 views

Frames of reference: Inertial and accelerated - and jerked, snapped, crackled and popped?

There are inertial frames of reference and the accelerated frames of reference, but are there any frames of references w.r.t. higher order derivatives of velocity? [1] [2] For example, jerked frames ...
0
votes
1answer
240 views

Accelerating fluid filled container [closed]

A container filled with fluid is accelerating initially with a1 and instantly changes to a2 (a2 < a1). What would happen to the fluid in the container. My thoughts on this - If the velocity of ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

How do I calculate the distance a ship will take to stop?

I am a River Pilot and drive ships for a living. These ships are very large and range up to 160,000 Metric Tons. I am trying to figure out how to calculate the distance to stopping. I have a basic ...
1
vote
4answers
827 views

When we take time derivative of a function of time, then is the result another function of time, again?

(I'll try to explain my question by one known example), for example where the velocity is a function of time v(t) then its time derivative (which is acceleration: $a=\frac {dv}{dt}$) is another ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Is there any case where one would use, snap, crackle or pop? [duplicate]

As we all know, if you differentiate distance with reference to time, you get speed, and likewise, differentiating speed you get acceleration. However, if you keep differentiating, to the rate of ...
39
votes
3answers
2k views
0
votes
3answers
123 views

Stresses in asteroid during close flyby

The acceleration of an asteroid (such as 2012DA14) as it approaches earth is proportional to the reciprocal of distance $r$ from earth center, squared. the derivative of the acceleration, or jerk, is ...
7
votes
3answers
845 views

In mechanics, is shock really better expressed as jerk instead of acceleration?

Some expensive electronics or mechanical devices are designed to be shock-resistant. However, the manufacturers often market the level of shock-resistance in units of g-force (I know g-force is really ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

How to brake 'beautifully'?

Sometimes when I'm driving my car, I play a "game" against myself in which I try to minimize the deceleration felt by passengers (including myself) while still braking in a reasonable short space. I ...
4
votes
2answers
457 views

Is there any case in physics where the equations of motion depend on high time derivatives of the position?

For example if the force on a particle is of the form $ \mathbf F = \mathbf F(\mathbf r, \dot{\mathbf r}, \ddot{\mathbf r}, \dddot{\mathbf r}) $, then the equation of motion would be a third order ...
0
votes
2answers
159 views

Non-zero higher time derivatives of position?

My mom told me to use speed control, which would allow the car to remain at constant speed. I told her that its impossible for a car to maintain constant speed, as slight changes in friction on the ...
3
votes
0answers
86 views

Jerk Magnitudes and Earthquakes

Destruction from earthquakes depends on many factors, including magnitude, occurrence depth and closeness to epicenter. One measure that may relate destructive force for buildings and infrastructure ...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

What came first, Rice Crispy or “Snap,” “Crackle,” and “Pop”? [closed]

The fourth, fifth, and sixth derivatives of position are called "Snap" "Crackle" and "Pop". What came first, the rice crispy characters, or the physics units?
1
vote
3answers
683 views

Calculate kinematics of body movement from the set of spatial coordinates

Short intro I have a set of 3D (x,y,z) spatial coordinates of arm movement obtained using motion capture system. The example set of such coordinates looks like this (rounded up): ...
-1
votes
1answer
175 views

Does light photons have jerk? [duplicate]

While searching in web regarding whether rate of change of acceleration is possible or not; I came across the concept of jerk. I want to know whether photons which can be accelerated can also have ...