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Difference between a hydrogen ion and a proton

I've run into a bit of a problem on this weeks coursework. A proton and an electron initially at rest combine to form hydrogen. Find the wavelength of the emitted photon? So, as far as I can ...
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28 views

Question on calculating the number density of free electrons in the sun's photosphere

I am writing a paper on the effect H$^-$ (a hydrogen atom with an additional electron) has on the opacity in the sun's photosphere. As such, I need to calculate its abundance. Doing so is ...
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Proton energy distribution after Si layer

I've been using SRIM to get an approximation of the energy distribution that a beam of monoenergetic incident ions will have after a thin layer of silicon. However, for my purposes it would be better ...
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53 views

If an atom is positively ionized, can is gain electrons if you emit photons at it?

I read somewhere that electrons and light are just electromagnetic radiation and are basically the same thing, does this mean that if you emit photons at an atom it will gain electrons?
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Ionization by heating

I would like to ask what happens if an atom exposed to a very high temperature - say millions of degrees (Kelvin). Can we use heating to separate electrons from their nucleus? And what happens to the ...
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20 views

Ionization of Electrons Intensity Relationship

Why can't light eject electrons out of atoms (ie. do ionization radiation)? Although the energy of light photons are low (more or less 2 eV), can't 5 photons consecutively hit the electron and make it ...
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84 views

Why does hydrogen give up its electron to a platinum catalyst?

All descriptions of a Hydrogen fueled fuel cell (such as this one) Start with $H_2$ giving up its electrons to a platinum coated anode. Then the $H^+$ ions (protons really) travel through the ...
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49 views

How is ionization explained in Quantum Mechanics?

I remember in my highschool chemistry classes, they taught that an atom can be ionized when it loses a valence electron and becomes positively charged. In quantum mechanics, if electrons aren't really ...
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54 views

Ion-neutralization processes and its energies

Ionization energies/Electron affinities are well mapped. I wonder about opposite processes... I imagine for anion the necessary energy will be equal to the electron affinity (energy released when ...
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81 views

Can a laser be designed to ionize muonic atoms so as to prevent a-sticking?

Muon catalyzed fusion is currently little more than a lab curiosity today in part because of how many hydrogen nuclei can be fused before the muon is carried away by an alpha particle. ...
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1answer
129 views

Hydrogen ionization energy [closed]

Proton and electron have a distance equal to the Bohr radius apart in the hydrogen atom. Knowing this, what's the ionization energy of the atom? So we know $U = -kq^2/a_B$, but this is potential ...
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35 views

x-ray in oil droplets experment

In oil droplet experiment, x-ray makes the air molecules negatively charged. How does that work? X-ray carries high energy and ionizes air, doesn't that make air positively charged?
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88 views

What happens to gas molecules after ionization?

I know that gas molecules conduct electricity after they get ionized but what will happen if we keep increasing the voltage even after ionization? Will it explode? If it will then how much energy ...
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1answer
153 views

What happens when you give excess energy to an atom?

So this is my question: An electron in a hydrogen atom in its ground state absorbs energy equal to the ionisation energy of $Li^{2+}$. The wavelength of the emitted electron is? I started off by ...
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1answer
56 views

Ionization Energy and Bohr

I was having problems with ionization energy - but all it is is the energy required to remove first electron that pops off right? In the case of Bohr's atom, there's only one electron, so it's that ...