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Interferences in a superposition of two energy states of a particle at rest

In Feynman's volume III, chapter 7, he describes a particle which is in a superposition of the energy states $E_1$ and $E_2$ as $$ e^{-i(E_1/\hbar)t} |E_1\rangle + e^{-i(E_2/\hbar)t} |E_2\rangle $$ ...
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0answers
41 views

Is it true that GR waves can interfere if and only if the change to the metric can take negative values?

This appears to be a unique question compared to other topics about electromagnetic waves or quantum mechanics already on Stack Exchange. The topic on resonance doesn't really answer this question. ...
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2answers
42 views

Describing 3-slit interference patterns

I'm typing up some physics notes about wave interference patterns and want to include a graph of the wave produced by a 3-slit experiment: Does anyone know what formula produces this kind of curve? ...
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0answers
134 views

Why is the shape of the fringes in Young's double slit experiment hyperbolic?

Why is the shape of the fringes in Young's double slit experiment hyperbolic? Morever what type of fringe pattern is obtained if slits are almost perpendicular to the screen? Can someone explain ...
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0answers
17 views

Interferences while using two ToF cameras

Im using two time-of-flight (ToF) cameras, a DS325 from SoftKinetic and a Creative Senz3D, at the same time with the DepthSense-SDK and the Point-Cloud-Library (on Ubuntu 15.04). But I got strong ...
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4answers
3k views

What causes this pattern of sunlight reflected off a table leg?

My friend noticed an interference-like pattern around the table leg. However, we do know that interference patterns of sunlight produces rainbow colours. What seems to be happening here?
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0answers
48 views

Thickness of thin-film interference [closed]

A thin film of alcohol ($n = 1.36$) lies on a flat glass plate ($n = 1.51$). When monochromatic light, whose wavelength can be changed, is incident normally, the intensity of the reflected light is a ...
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1answer
84 views

Thin film interference [closed]

There is a light wave that travels through a thin film of oil (index of refraction is $1.25$) of thickness $d$. The total length of this "portion" of the wave in oil would be $\Delta x = d$ If this ...
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3answers
109 views

Mach-Zehnder Interferometer: two output interference pattern question

I have drawn diagram so not to confuse. So far, I've heard that in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, two output should have one constructive interference, and one destructive interference for other. ...
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0answers
37 views

Is there a theoretical derivation of Kim's delayed choice quantum eraser?

Is there a theoretical derivation of Kim's delayed choice quantum eraser? The original paper only shows the experimental data.
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1answer
52 views

In double slit experiments of particles (quantum) which the result is interference pattern, How many particles reach the observing screen?

I mean, I know the particles that reach the screen are going both/neither/either of slits and interference with themselves but statically/percentage how many particles interact with slits, are there ...
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0answers
26 views

In Rayleigh's criterion, why does length not figure in the minimum achievable resolution?

For an $n$ slitted grating, Rayleigh's criterion is given by: $\frac{\Delta \lambda}{\lambda} = \frac{1}{Nm}$ (*) When I imagine two lightwaves of slightly different wavelength being shown through ...
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1answer
67 views

Path length difference from multiple sources?

I know that path length difference is given by the difference in the distance from each source to the observer, but I feel like this doesn't apply when some of the distances are the same, like in the ...
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1answer
47 views

Why, in order to obtain distinct interference, is a small distance between the two waves essential?

This is quoted from Concepts of Physics by H.C.Verma: In order to obtain a fairly distinct interference pattern, the path difference between the two waves originating from coherent sources should ...
0
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1answer
130 views

Fringe Width and Spacing and Number of Slits in Diffraction Experiments

In a single slit experiment, the fringes are not equally spaced and aren’t of equal widths—the central maximum is the widest, the secondary maxima grow narrower and narrower outward, and the minima ...
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2answers
104 views

Interference conditions problem

We know that two wave sources can interfere if two sources have the same frequency two sources must have a constant phase difference over time. But I think that if condition 1 is satisfied, ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Are the produced entangled photons in type II SPDC always in phase?

Are the produced entangled photons in type II SPDC (spontaneous parametric down conversion) always in phase? In Kim's delayed choice quantum eraser, two entangled photons are produced by a BBQ ...
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1answer
62 views

Can one detect a single photon through measuring its impulse/momentum on a mirror?

Can one detect a single photon through measuring its impulse/momentum on a mirror? If the answer if YES or theoretically possible, photon path and interference fringes can be detected simultaneously ...
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1answer
52 views

RF disturbances produced by transmission power lines

I need a book or paper that contains "the effects of transmission lines on the radio frequency transmission and disturbances". Could you help me find a useful textbook? Thank you
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2answers
75 views

How is the virtual image reconstructed from a hologram?

To make a hologram a film is exposed to an incident plane wave and wave from the object to record the interference pattern on the film. The principle is commonly explained in a way like that in p.1212 ...
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2answers
29 views

Does background noise while strumming a string affect the frequency recorded?

Does the interference of the waves cause instances of destructive interference where there is no amplitude. Technically the wave is still there although its amplitude is 'cancelled' out but those ...
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1answer
98 views

Do two waves of different frequencies create a resultant wave of lower frequency?

In my results for testing background noise, i found that while strumming a guitar in: a noisy area, the frequency picked up by the mic was 352 Hz while in a quiet area, the frequency picked up by ...
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2answers
97 views

x-ray diffraction of crystals

In explaining x-ray diffraction of crystals, usually the approach is to consider the atoms absorb radiation and scatter it, at some angles constructive interference occur and bright spots can be ...
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0answers
84 views

Question about dark fringe in diffraction

In finding the angle for the mth dark fringe of single slit diffraction using Huygen's principle, they usually split the slit into equal portions. For example, to find the first dark fringe the slit ...
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2answers
43 views

Interference of two waves of different frequencies relevance to background noise + sonometer

If two sound waves of different frequencies are recorded then does the interference between the two waves of different frequencies alter the resultant frequency recorded. In better context, I'm ...
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2answers
47 views

Is there a version of “delayed choice” for sound waves?

I'm familiar with the uncertainty principle in harmonic analysis, which states that you can't localize the support of a function in both the time domain and the Fourier domain. One of the physical ...
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0answers
31 views

Does the double split experiment set boundaries to the concept of localization?

Feynman's textbook on quantum mechanics starts with the double split experiment for single electrons, see chapter 1-5. The astonishing result is the self-interference of the single electron as long as ...
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1answer
47 views

Elitzur–Vaidman bomb tester value on Wikipedia

Looking at this diagram from Wikipedia: I was trying to make sense of the sentence the interference is constructive at C and destructive at D Let's take a look at the superposition at C. ...
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0answers
50 views

A real 'two line' (non-interference pattern) when observed

I have seen many interference patterns from double slit experiments but I have never seen a real 'two line' pattern when observed. Does this actually exist or is it only a conclusion? if there is an ...
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0answers
26 views

Thickness of glass sheet with Michelson's interferometer

I've got a question, are we able to calculate the thickness of a glass sheet by using Michelson interferometer experiment ?
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0answers
97 views

Using the double slit experiment to prove or disprove the de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory

Probably a dumb question... If you have a double slit experiment with a second experiment (single or double slit) at 90 degrees intersecting the path of the first experiment, would the interference ...
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1answer
124 views

Probability and double slit

if a beam of identical particles at random distances from each other (or exactly 1/2 lambda between each other) travelling with the same v towards a double sllit do not interfere with each others wave ...
3
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1answer
23 views

Creating complex interference figures with simple sources

3D printers that use Stereolithography usually have to build a 3D object layer by layer, each layer being constructed by having a laser travel across the surface until it has hardened all the layer's ...
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2answers
84 views

thin film interference of light

In a thin film interference (reflective system) I know that condition for maxima is $$2\mu t\cos(r)=(2n\pm 1)\frac{\lambda}{2}$$ and for minima is $$2\mu t\cos(r)=n\lambda$$ and for transitive ...
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0answers
27 views

What is the kernel for a double slit experiment? [duplicate]

In the book path integrals by Feynman and Hibbs, the author has established the kernel for a single slit in the Gaussian form. How can I find the kernel for a double slit in a similar fashion as ...
0
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1answer
218 views

Constructive and destructive interference

I read this information off a website: "The most important requirement for interference is to have at least two waves. One wave alone behaves just as we have been discussing. We shall see that ...
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1answer
160 views

Is the formula, for finding the distance between two slits, my books gives correct?

In my book'a section on Young's double-slit experiment, the formula, $d = m \lambda \sin\theta$, is given. In this equation $d$ is the distance between two slits, $\lambda$ is the wavelength of light ...
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1answer
117 views

Is this diagram, concerning Young's double slits, inaccurate?

"This diagram" : My question is whether those lines (interference) have to originate from a single point. The diagram used to demonstrate what $m$ (path difference) means, has two lines originating ...
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0answers
30 views

Viewing tube light through small cracks

This question appeared on a test: If you peer through very small cracks between your fringes at a tube light some distance away will you see interference patterns, Fresnel patterns or Fraunhofer ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Waves interfere in angle equation

If we had two waves perpendicular to each other, with equations: $x=α \sin(ωt)$ (1) $y=β \sin(ωt+π/2) ==> y=β \cos(ωt)$(2) $\sin(ωt)^2+\cos(ωt)^2=x^2/α^2+y^2/β^2=1$ $x^2/α^2+y^2/β^2=1$ is an ...
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2answers
118 views

How are standing waves a result of constructive and destructive interferences?

For constructive I can understand. But destructive I can't. I can not picture the shape of two pulses or waves maybe that form the resulting standing wave. The places where waves are canceled just ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Circular polarisation destroying interference pattern for double slit

I have been trying to mathematically explain the empirical result that putting orthogonal polarisers (quarter-wave plates) behind the two slits of a double-slit setup will erase the interference ...
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0answers
38 views

Deviation on the Diffraction Pattern when not perpendicular

Due to Babinet principle, Diffraction pattern of an opaque .... ( you all know ). here my opaque is my wire. So, I know that if I change the angle between beam and wire ( I mean if I don't aim the ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Interference of Beams with Different Polarizations

I have read in many places that orthogonally polarized light beams do not interfere. However, I also know that orthogonal vectors, such as force, do affect each other and give a resulting force. So, ...
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0answers
63 views

Does Quantum Mechanics need imaginary numbers? [duplicate]

In quantum mechanics, we assume wavefunctions are complex valued, and that probability amplitudes are given by the modulus of the wavefunction squared. This formalism can correctly explain ...
4
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2answers
139 views

How can laser interferomerty be used to measure path difference smaller than wavelength of laser light?

The currently proposed Gravitational wave detection apparatus consists of Michelson Interferometer which is supposed to measure distances of the order of $10^{-22}$m. But the wavelength of the light ...
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0answers
22 views

Interference on curved film

Let's say I have a curved film in the XY plane, delimited by $y=0$, $y=\sqrt{x}$, $x=L$. Now I light the thin film from the top and I try to see the interference pattern by transmision. I'm stuck ...
6
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4answers
309 views

Explanation of Michelson Interferometer Fringe Shift

I have been working on an experiment where 2 glass microscope slides are pinched together at one end (so that there is a "wedge" of air between them) and placed in the path of a laser in one leg of a ...
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2answers
103 views

Why light comes out in spherical form after passing through a slit (diffraction)?

I want to know why light comes out in spherical form when it passes through the slit? I know this is due to diffraction but how? And my second question, if there is no difference between ...
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2answers
147 views

Wheeler's delayed choice experiment

In Wheeler's delayed choice experiment (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheeler%27s_delayed_choice_experiment) When the experimental apparatus does not contain a final interfering mirror, the photon is ...