Interference describes different waves superposing to form a resultant wave of greater, lower, or the same amplitude. Normally, it involves interaction of waves that are correlated (coherent) with each other, either because they come from the same source, or because they have the same or nearly the ...

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Situations in which there is path difference interference or formation of standing waves [on hold]

I came up with a doubt about standing waves and path difference in general. Consider these two different cases as examples. If I have a rope fixed at one end and I make the free end oscillating, I ...
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Why do we hear better during the night? [duplicate]

At night, we hear weak and far sounds approximately clear, while during the day we cannot. My high school physics teacher was saying that “this is because of interference of sound waves. During the ...
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57 views

Conservation of energy in interference of light

In interference of light, I know that energy is conserved globally but how the energy disappeared at minima appears at maxima? Is there any path by which energy flowed or is it just energy couldn't ...
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28 views

Why anti-reflective coating of silicon nitride colour varies with thickness?

Why the silicon nitride colour varies with the thickness?
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How to apply conservation of energy to active noise-cancelling headphones?

Active noise-cancelling headphones add the opposite waveforms of the ambient sound in order to cancel out this ambient sound by destructive interference. I do not understand why adding more power in ...
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26 views

Can interference occur between two waves that are parallel but separated by a small distance?

This is a image of diffraction in crystal. My doubt is how the parallel waves coming out interfere if they are seperate?
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Double-slit experiment detector interference

In most of the explanation clips of the double-slit experiment, nobody talks about possible detector interference. This is the only clip that I've found to explain that the detector doesn't cause ...
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24 views

Why is collision of electrons different from alpha particles in terms of probability amplitude?

In The Feynman lectures on physics volume 3, chapter 3, page 3-11, there is the following paragraph: An even more perplexing thing happens when we do the same kind of experiment by scattering ...
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49 views

Why do we add intensities for coherent sound sources?

When there are N coherent sound sources playing the same note at equal loudness, their sound waves add up to make a sine wave of the same frequency but most likely different amplitude (can be anything ...
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How comes unpolarized light do not undergo destructive interference?

As far as I know, unpolarized light is defined as light which as no clear axis of polarization, but electric field vectors in all directions. However, I also know that electric fields can be ...
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How can the amplitude of the same acoustic wave be different in a interferometer?

I came up with an exercise on Halliday Resnick Krane that asked a question which consfuses me. I premit that I do not look for a solution of the exercise but for suggestions only regarding the ...
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Acoustic beats interference vs. path difference interference

I'm trying to understand the differences between two kinds of waves interference. The first one is a time-interference, only due to frequency difference of the two waves with the same amplitude, which ...
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Video recording interference

I'm currently working on an Android App that records while driving in a car. Similar to the popular Dashcams. While developing this App I saw a lot of ugly glitches on my videos. I used a Nexus 5 for ...
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Why does fluorescence emission detector pick up second order wavelengths with first order scan, even though they have different angles?

my question in more detail and with an example: Let's say I have a 980nm laser and I use that laser to excite my fluorescent solution in cuvette. My scan range is from 300 to 800nm. If, for example I ...
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Gaussian beam interference

The superposition of a gaussian beam and a plane wave generates a pattern of rings whose phase shift before and after the focal plane (of the gaussian beam) is $\pi$. This means that if you measure ...
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Interference of light waves

So my problem now is how do I add the intensities of the resultants of the two constructive interferences. Thanks in advance. Don't hesitate in asking me anything related to the question.
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194 views

Standing wave on a rope fixed at both sides: minus sign in the reflected wave

I'm studying stationary waves on a rope fixed at both sides. In some books I find that the wave function studied is the sum of incident wave $\xi_1(x,t)$ and of the reflected wave $\xi_2(x,t)$. $$\xi(...
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Relation between variation of tension and frequency of a standing wave

What is the relation between a variation of tension and the variation of frequency of standing wave in a rope? I get this expression differentiatin the relation between $f$ and $T$ $$f=\frac{1}{2L \...
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90 views

How far apart can the slits be in a double-slit experiment using direct sunlight?

In a normal double slit experiment, I'm told that sunlight doesn't produce a visible interference pattern because there is no stable phase relationship between the two slits. However, sunlight ...
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Introducing a phase, what changes?

This question is related to: Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the Fresnel-Arago laws Let us say we have unpolarised wave taking the form: $$\psi=\psi_0 e^{i(kx-\omega t)+i\phi(t)}$$ Where $\phi$ ...
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What is the explanation for the interference patterns in MWI?

In Young's double-slit experiment, MWI states that in some "worlds" the particle goes through one slit, and in others it goes through the other. If this is so, why do we get an interference pattern? ...
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Amplitude modification in double slit interference

Over the surface of interference, illumination varies. We have calculated so perfectly about it, so that we know exactly how the variation chart looks like. Even our vision renders it as in that chart....
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Why the incessant confusion between diffraction and interference? [closed]

Feynman said, "No one has ever been able to define the difference between interference and diffraction satisfactorily. It is just a question of usage, and there is no specific, important physical ...
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Is it correct that the polarized scatter of a polarized light source is max. orthogonal to the light source?

First of all, is the statement above correct? And if so, is there a constant gradient, with no polarized scatter parallel to the polarized source up to fully polarized at 90 degrees?
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What happens when two polarized lights of the same wavelength interfere at 90 degrees with each other?

am I right in assuming that if I cross two polarized lights of the same wavelength the result would be destructive interference? I don't mean 90 degrees as in 'orthogonal polarization', but the two ...
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Why don't the colors in an oil slick change as I walk past?

After it rains, I often see bands of color on the asphalt roads. This is usually explained as an thin film interference. Wikipedia has a picture of it which looks by inspection to be the same ...
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Is this true about low-light/one photon at-a-time double-slit interference?

I've consistently noticed in pictures of double-slit interference when very low-light or one photon at-a-time is used, that there's lots of "stray" photons detected in the areas of destructive ...
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Backing out of interactions: Does physics account for such a thing?

Does physics account for interactions between light and matter ever being "not completed" or backed out of? Here's what led me to the question. In learning about interference in light, I ended up ...
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Interference Pattern and dark lines

Two very narrow slits are spaced apart and are placed 35.0 cm from a screen. What is the distance between the first and second dark lines of the interference pattern when the slits are illuminated ...
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Does constructive interference imply that an atom interacts with >1 photon simultaneously?

If we're conducting a double-slit experiment using coherent monochrome light, we know that, wherever two light-waves fall on the same point, whether they destructively or constructively interfere with ...
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How does an increase in temperature change the width of the central bright for Fraunhofer's single slit experiment?

When coherent light shines onto a metal sheet with a thin slit. There will be an interference pattern with a central bright fringe. If the temperature of the metal is increased, this causes linear ...
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What double slit separation distance is necessary for natural light to display no interference pattern?

I know that natural light has a temporal range over which it's coherent, and an associated coherence length. If the path length difference of the light from each slit is greater than this coherence ...
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Do bosons and fermions produce the same interference pattern in a double slit experiment?

I have read that when bosons interfere they do so by adding the probability amplitudes, then I read that when fermions interfere they do so by subtracting the probability amplitudes. The usual double ...
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60 views

Interference of light waves question

We were recently asked to solve a question in class which goes as follows: In a modified Young's double slit experiment, a monochromatic uniform and parallel light beam of wavelength $6000$ ...
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can different force fields interfere (create interference patterns)

Edit: I have rewritten the question for clarity. I know waves of photons can interfere eachother. What about if you mixed waves of photos with w and z bosons? What about gravitons (if they exist) ...
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How can 2 EM waves null each other at a point but continue to propagate?

how can 2 EM waves (travelling in opposite directions) null each other at a point in space but continue to propagate beyond the point in space where they interact to null each other?
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Standing wave confusion

To form a standing wave, two coherent waves must travel in opposite direction. But is it it necessary for them to have the same amplitude and no phase angle difference?
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Double-Slit Experiment /w Switch

So if you perform the double-slit experiment without detection, you'll see an interference pattern. If you interfere with a photon at the slit, you'll see the wave-form collapse. So if you turn the ...
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What was Newton's own explanation of Newton's rings?

What was Newton's own explanation of Newton's rings? Newton advocated a corpuscular theory of light, but his rings would most conveniently be explained by a wave theory. How did he explain his own ...
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Diffraction pattern from laser shone on coffe-filter plastered on glass pane

I make an ordinary coffe filter wet and plaster it on a glass pane. I then shine a laser onto the filter (on the side of the pane with the coffe filter). When I do this, I see what I assume is an ...
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Michelson interferometer finding $\frac{\Delta \nu}{\bar \nu}$?

Let us say we send light with wavenumber $\bar \nu \pm \frac{\Delta \bar \nu}{2}$ through a Michelson Interferometer. Using the intensity at the center of the interference pattern $I(x)$ (where $x$ is ...
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Why do electrons/photons create an interference pattern in the double slit experiment? [duplicate]

So...if electrons and photons are both particles and they pass the two slits, why do they create an interference pattern as if they were waves? Now from what I've read, it's because of the ...
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Does Increasing the Width of the Slit Increase the Intensity of the Light Passing Through it Considering the Slit as a Source

I did an experiment in which I tried to show that the visibility of the interference fringes is related to the relative slit width in a double slit interferometer. In other words if one slit had a ...
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Will decorrelating an audio signal help reduce interference patterns at low frequencies?

In live sound it is common to have a left/right sub-speaker configuration, which will produce an strong interference pattern in the audience area based on listener/sub-speaker locations. If the left/...
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46 views

Does Laser Intensity Depend on the Size of the Beam

I have always understood intensity to be defined as power divided by area. However, I have read (in the Wikipedia article on intensity) that intensity in optics can mean something slightly different. ...
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Is double slit interference due to EM/de Broglie waves? And how does this relate to quantum mechanical waves?

I'm really confused about the fact that there seems to be two types of waves at play: the EM wave, which I understand to be an actual fluctuation of EM fields in space, and this other type of bulk "...
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If I observe an interference pattern, will I able to know the source?

The condition to get an interference pattern we must need coherent sources. After superposition, they produce interference. If we select a random photon in the superposition states, can I know the ...
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29 views

Why are fringes displaced when a thin film is introduced (Michelson interferometer)?

I'm reading everywhere that when you place a thin film in one arm of an interferometer, fringes are displaced. No-one seems to explicitly say why; maybe because it's meant to be obvious. I know ...
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Time-coherency of “incoherent” light

Even "incoherent" light as the one of a light bulb has some coherency, and would interfer in the double-slit experiment (even if more blurry because the different wavelengths don't trigger the same ...
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How does light behave after experiencing fully destructive interference, as in an interferometer?

I'm thinking about a laser interferometer like the one used in LIGO. Here's the basic layout (from Wikipedia - Interferometry): My understanding is that the half of the light that is reflected by ...