Interference describes different waves superposing to form a resultant wave of greater, lower, or the same amplitude. Normally, it involves interaction of waves that are correlated (coherent) with each other, either because they come from the same source, or because they have the same or nearly the ...

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Why the incessant confusion between diffraction and interference? [on hold]

Feynman said, "No one has ever been able to define the difference between interference and diffraction satisfactorily. It is just a question of usage, and there is no specific, important physical ...
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Is it correct that the polarized scatter of a polarized light source is max. orthogonal to the light source?

First of all, is the statement above correct? And if so, is there a constant gradient, with no polarized scatter parallel to the polarized source up to fully polarized at 90 degrees?
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What happens when two polarized lights of the same wavelength interfere at 90 degrees with each other?

am I right in assuming that if I cross two polarized lights of the same wavelength the result would be destructive interference? I don't mean 90 degrees as in 'orthogonal polarization', but the two ...
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Interference phenomenon energy must be conserved [closed]

Interference phenomenon energy conservation
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Why don't the colors in an oil slick change as I walk past?

After it rains, I often see bands of color on the asphalt roads. This is usually explained as an thin film interference. Wikipedia has a picture of it which looks by inspection to be the same ...
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Single particle diffraction: how is this possible?

The intensity distribution of diffraction patterns are typically explained by looking at points of constructive and destructive interference of the diffracted waves on the detector. These diffracted ...
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Is this true about low-light/one photon at-a-time double-slit interference?

I've consistently noticed in pictures of double-slit interference when very low-light or one photon at-a-time is used, that there's lots of "stray" photons detected in the areas of destructive ...
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72 views

Backing out of interactions: Does physics account for such a thing?

Does physics account for interactions between light and matter ever being "not completed" or backed out of? Here's what led me to the question. In learning about interference in light, I ended up ...
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46 views

Interference Pattern and dark lines

Two very narrow slits are spaced apart and are placed 35.0 cm from a screen. What is the distance between the first and second dark lines of the interference pattern when the slits are illuminated ...
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42 views

Does constructive interference imply that an atom interacts with >1 photon simultaneously?

If we're conducting a double-slit experiment using coherent monochrome light, we know that, wherever two light-waves fall on the same point, whether they destructively or constructively interfere with ...
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How does an increase in temperature change the width of the central bright for Fraunhofer's single slit experiment?

When coherent light shines onto a metal sheet with a thin slit. There will be an interference pattern with a central bright fringe. If the temperature of the metal is increased, this causes linear ...
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What double slit separation distance is necessary for natural light to display no interference pattern?

I know that natural light has a temporal range over which it's coherent, and an associated coherence length. If the path length difference of the light from each slit is greater than this coherence ...
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Do bosons and fermions produce the same interference pattern in a double slit experiment?

I have read that when bosons interfere they do so by adding the probability amplitudes, then I read that when fermions interfere they do so by subtracting the probability amplitudes. The usual double ...
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46 views

Interference of light waves question

We were recently asked to solve a question in class which goes as follows: In a modified Young's double slit experiment, a monochromatic uniform and parallel light beam of wavelength $6000$ ...
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can different force fields interfere (create interference patterns)

Edit: I have rewritten the question for clarity. I know waves of photons can interfere eachother. What about if you mixed waves of photos with w and z bosons? What about gravitons (if they exist) ...
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How can 2 EM waves null each other at a point but continue to propagate?

how can 2 EM waves (travelling in opposite directions) null each other at a point in space but continue to propagate beyond the point in space where they interact to null each other?
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34 views

Standing wave confusion

To form a standing wave, two coherent waves must travel in opposite direction. But is it it necessary for them to have the same amplitude and no phase angle difference?
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26 views

Double-Slit Experiment /w Switch

So if you perform the double-slit experiment without detection, you'll see an interference pattern. If you interfere with a photon at the slit, you'll see the wave-form collapse. So if you turn the ...
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1answer
337 views

What was Newton's own explanation of Newton's rings?

What was Newton's own explanation of Newton's rings? Newton advocated a corpuscular theory of light, but his rings would most conveniently be explained by a wave theory. How did he explain his own ...
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1answer
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Diffraction pattern from laser shone on coffe-filter plastered on glass pane

I make an ordinary coffe filter wet and plaster it on a glass pane. I then shine a laser onto the filter (on the side of the pane with the coffe filter). When I do this, I see what I assume is an ...
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110 views

Michelson interferometer finding $\frac{\Delta \nu}{\bar \nu}$?

Let us say we send light with wavenumber $\bar \nu \pm \frac{\Delta \bar \nu}{2}$ through a Michelson Interferometer. Using the intensity at the center of the interference pattern $I(x)$ (where $x$ is ...
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59 views

Why do electrons/photons create an interference pattern in the double slit experiment? [duplicate]

So...if electrons and photons are both particles and they pass the two slits, why do they create an interference pattern as if they were waves? Now from what I've read, it's because of the ...
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1answer
51 views

Does Increasing the Width of the Slit Increase the Intensity of the Light Passing Through it Considering the Slit as a Source

I did an experiment in which I tried to show that the visibility of the interference fringes is related to the relative slit width in a double slit interferometer. In other words if one slit had a ...
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Will decorrelating an audio signal help reduce interference patterns at low frequencies?

In live sound it is common to have a left/right sub-speaker configuration, which will produce an strong interference pattern in the audience area based on listener/sub-speaker locations. If the ...
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1answer
45 views

Does Laser Intensity Depend on the Size of the Beam

I have always understood intensity to be defined as power divided by area. However, I have read (in the Wikipedia article on intensity) that intensity in optics can mean something slightly different. ...
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76 views

Is double slit interference due to EM/de Broglie waves? And how does this relate to quantum mechanical waves?

I'm really confused about the fact that there seems to be two types of waves at play: the EM wave, which I understand to be an actual fluctuation of EM fields in space, and this other type of bulk ...
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34 views

If I observe an interference pattern, will I able to know the source?

The condition to get an interference pattern we must need coherent sources. After superposition, they produce interference. If we select a random photon in the superposition states, can I know the ...
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1answer
28 views

Why are fringes displaced when a thin film is introduced (Michelson interferometer)?

I'm reading everywhere that when you place a thin film in one arm of an interferometer, fringes are displaced. No-one seems to explicitly say why; maybe because it's meant to be obvious. I know ...
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Time-coherency of “incoherent” light

Even "incoherent" light as the one of a light bulb has some coherency, and would interfer in the double-slit experiment (even if more blurry because the different wavelengths don't trigger the same ...
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1answer
26 views

How does light behave after experiencing fully destructive interference, as in an interferometer?

I'm thinking about a laser interferometer like the one used in LIGO. Here's the basic layout (from Wikipedia - Interferometry): My understanding is that the half of the light that is reflected by ...
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1answer
27 views

How do large interferometers work?

In very large Michelson interferometer a such as LIGO, how can we keep the two light paths at the exact same distance in order to avoid any unwanted and noisy fringes shift? When I used to make ...
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21 views

Gibbs isotherm and calculating interfacial tension change from first principles

Question: Is it possible for a solid particle to change the surface tension between two phases? (or: Does a solid particle have a chemical potential?) This question stems from the more ...
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56 views

Loss of interference in single-photon Mach–Zehnder interferometer with detector in only one arm

I have read that if you have a Mach–Zehnder interferometer (doing a single-photon experiment) and put a non-destructive detector in only one of the two arms (connected to the first beam splitter), you ...
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1answer
79 views

Michelson Morley experiment - why is there an interference pattern in the first place?

In descriptions of the experiment, the two arms of the interferometer have the same length. There's an interference pattern which was expected to be shifted when the system was rotated 90 degrees. But ...
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Can we obtain interference pattern with single electron/photon in Young's double slit experiment? [duplicate]

Can we obtain interference pattern by using single electron/photon in Young's Double slit experiment? If yes, then how ...and if no, then why?
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Resultant Intensity due to three Light sources [closed]

How to calculate resultant intensity at a point due to three light sources...?
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47 views

Are coherent tunneling and incoherent hopping belong to quantum interference?

What the accurate definition of quantum interference in molecule or molecules? In some case, there is coherent tunneling in a molecule junction while sometime it is incoherent hopping, or even the ...
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1answer
47 views

What happens if two possible paths interfere with each other but are different in their length?

Can you explain what happens if two possible photon paths interfere with each other but are different in their length? When does the interference pattern appear? I suggest it happens after the time ...
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57 views

Single Slit/Double Slit path differences

When diffracting light through a double slit, I understand that the two sources must arrive on the screen m(wavelengths) out of phase [where m is any whole number], in order for a bright fringe to ...
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50 views

Double slit with observer?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xmq_FJd1oUQ Apologize if this is a dumb question, I'm just a kid trying to make sense of something that I'm new to. It shows the wave interference when you send a ...
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58 views

If 2 photons never interact with one another, how come we get an interference pattern? [closed]

OK better to be insured: I'll exclude very high energy photons. Albert Einstein's paper on photo electric effect say that light is quantized loosely speaking, now in a double slit experiment How can ...
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What's the reason double-slit experiment can't be explained by edge effects rather than quantum interference? [closed]

Say we had exactly this... But instead, it was a PING PONG GUN (imagine as table tennis players use to train), throwing out PING PONG BALLS. The two slits are say 20 cm wide, and the observing ...
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1answer
33 views

Monochromatic light and interference [duplicate]

What I want to ask is monochromatic light necessary for interference? Doesn't interference occur on just the superposition of two waves(any waves)? And Why don't waves of different wavelengths don't ...
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If I aimed two identical lasers at a screen, what would the interference pattern look like? [duplicate]

If I aimed two identical lasers at a distant screen, what would the interference pattern look like? Could this be modelled as a wavefront passing through two slits, i.e. the double slit experiment? I ...
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38 views

What happens when A laser beam reflects from a cd surface?

The thing is that when light reflects from the surface of a medium with higher refractive index than that of the medium in wich is traveling then change phase by 180 degrees...The picture that I ...
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1answer
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how can interference occur within diffraction?

My book says : The number of interference fringes occuring in the broad diffraction peak depends on the ratio d/a that is the ratio of the distance between the two slits to the width of a slit. In ...
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37 views

Is there sound diffraction grating? [closed]

Sound is also a wave phenomenon. Therefore, is there any counterpart of the usual optical grating for sound?
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1answer
64 views

Quantum eraser experiment with unbalanced interfereometers

In quantum eraser experiments, which path information is made available and then destroyed before the photon hits the screen. Now, say we had an experiment in which a photon is sent to a double slit ...
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1answer
66 views

Current quantum theory of interference

I have always thought that the quantum theory states that interference occurs when photons behave like waves and two or more possible paths exist. Interference can then be destroyed if the path of the ...
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64 views

Wave Function Collapse and Which Path Information

From what I understand, wave function collapse occurs when a photon/wave/particle/whatevertheheckitis which was previously in a superposition of states, collapses to one state. Now, in a double slit ...