Particle interactions are changes in the nature, number, or state of several particles, usually at a specific space-time point, underlying dynamics. They are represented by special "field interaction terms" in quantum field theory and normally entail interchanges of energy, momentum, and sundry ...

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6answers
9k views

Why is gravitation force always attractive?

Why is the gravitational force always attractive? Is there another way to explain this without the curvature of space time? PS: If the simple answer to this question is that mass makes space-time ...
16
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3answers
2k views

Can all fundamental forces be fictitious forces?

After reading many questions, like this and this, I wonder: is it possible to consider also the other fundamental forces, the electroweak interaction and the strong interaction or ultimately the ...
23
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6answers
1k views

Simple example showing why measurement & interaction are different

Does someone know of a clear (pedagogical) example where one can really see(with the math) where interaction and measurement are not synonymous in quantum mechanics? I know that every measurement ...
50
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6answers
30k views

How exactly does gravity work?

The electromagnetic force and strong and weak forces require particles like photons and gluons. But in case of gravity there is no such particle found. Every mass bearing object creates a ...
8
votes
1answer
799 views

Why will two bubbles floating on water surface attract each other?

Two identical bubbles floating on water surface will form clumps, according to the "cheerio effect". But what's the detail about the force? It's necessary to calculate the shape of water surface, in ...
17
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1answer
2k views

Interpretation of derivative interaction term in QFT

I am trying to understand what a term like $$ \mathcal{L}_{int} = (\partial^{\mu}A )^2 B^2 $$ with $A$ and $B$ being scalar fields for instance means. I understand how to draw an interaction term in ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Newton's third law at the quantum level? [closed]

let's look at force at the atomic level to understand the newtons third law of motion. I'll use Helium atoms as an example. Now imagine we start with one atom HE2 stationary, and throw another atom ...
3
votes
1answer
984 views

Are fundamental forces conservative?

I wonder whether fundamental forces are conservative. First of all, I'm not sure if we can talk about conservative forces, since to study electromagnetism, weak and strong interactions we need QFT. ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

How is the EM force exchanged over long distances?

The Situation Imagine we place two charged objects a very far distance apart, essentially making them point charges. How does the EM force interact between the two point charges if virtual photons ...
6
votes
2answers
215 views

In QFT how do you write down the most general interactions?

This past year I took a QFT class and I now feel comfortable solving scattering problems, but I am still a bit perplexed by how physicists write down a Lagrangian in the first place. In particular, ...
3
votes
2answers
467 views

Gell-Mann Low Theorem and Vacuum Energy

I know that the sum of vacuum bubbles can be related to the Vacuum energy, but I'm trying to understand how this follows from the Gell-Mann Low theorem/equation. My question will use equations from ...
0
votes
1answer
226 views

Propagator and probability amplitude that a particle propagates

My QFT knowledge has very much rusted and i got confused by these few lines from Peskin and Schroeder: p.27: " [..] the amplitude for a particle to propagate from $y$ to $x$ is $\langle 0| \phi(x) ...
2
votes
2answers
179 views

Static fields - are properties of single objects, or do exist only between two interacting objects?

I apologize for seeming to return on a same question, but I don't have the feeling that the things are clear. In a former question, "where is the potential energy stored", the conclusion was that ...
1
vote
2answers
968 views

How to tell the order of a Feynman diagram?

How can we know the order of a Feynman diagram just from the pictorial representation? Is it the number of vertices divided by 2? For example, I know that electnro-positron annihilaiton is first ...
6
votes
2answers
295 views

Why are the “coupling constants” constant?

The coupling constants (in the gauge theory) fix an inner product on the lie algebra of the gauge group and we use it to define strength of the fields. we are using ad-invariant inner products which ...
4
votes
1answer
115 views

Range Of An Interaction

Why is the Compton wavelength $\lambda_c=\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ used as a sensible measure for the range of an interaction, where $m$ is the mass of the corresponding mediator?
3
votes
1answer
79 views

What is it that Lagrangian density with only bilinear terms always corresponds to free field theory?

Is there an intuitive proof of this fact? (Maybe connected in some way to Central Limit Theorem?).
1
vote
1answer
222 views

Why is the gravitational force $10^{38}$ times smaller than the strong nuclear force?

Also, why is the weak interaction force $10^7$ times smaller than the strong nuclear force?
1
vote
0answers
235 views

Range of forces from mass of force carrier?

Why is $\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ a good estimate of the range of the four forces, where $m$ is the mass of the carrier particle of the force? Inputting the pion mass gives $1.4\ \mathrm{fm}$ for the hadronic ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

The charges of the forces

I am trying to establish a simplified understanding of the fundamental forces to explain them to a young audience. If we say that gravity has one charge (attractive), electromagnetism has two charges ...
3
votes
3answers
698 views

Relation between wavelength and system size

We always say that when a given light wave interacts with atoms bound in a molecule, only waves with wavelength close to the inter-atomic-spacing are able to probe the system. In other context (...
2
votes
3answers
277 views

What is the cause the light is affected by gravity? [duplicate]

I know that photons have no mass and that a photons exist only moving at the speed of light. So what is the cause that a massive astronomical object can bend a ray of light? I have two thoughts, but I ...
2
votes
2answers
282 views

Interaction speed between electric charges and magnetic materials

Einstein said that the speed of a matter in universe cannot exceed the speed of light. Is it correct for electric force transmission speed from one electric charge to other one? What is ...
2
votes
2answers
335 views

Potential in Quantum field theory

I studied free particle field like Dirac field and Klein Gordon field. My question is about interaction. How can I put a potential term in the Lagrangian density? $\mathcal{L} =\frac{1}{2}\partial_\...
1
vote
2answers
757 views

How do magnets work?

I've read a classbook on the field theory (including EM): it perfectly describes quantitive patterns in EM-theory, but I have no luck understanding how and why it works. I mean, magnetic substances ...