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$G$-parity in an electromagnetic decay

I am looking at the decay $\eta\rightarrow\pi^+\pi^-\gamma$ and I would assume that the decay itself (ignoring the $\pi\pi$ final state interaction that is obviously strong) is electromagnetic since ...
5
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1answer
84 views

Why can interactions be neglected for the Integer Quantum Hall effect?

Though the statement is made often, I've not seen any justification for neglecting electron-electron (Coulomb) interactions in the fully filled $\nu =1$ IQH state. I would highly appreciate if someone ...
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1answer
62 views

Quartic terms as two particle interaction?

In some lecture notes I found the sentence: [...] considering two toy models: the classical and quantum harmonic oscillator with quartic perturbation. The quartic terms $\sim x^4$ and $\sim \hat x ...
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2answers
78 views

Does yukawa potential of two particles have effect on each other? [closed]

Okay,a novice here.Suppose two particle interact with Higgs field.Does The Yukawa potential created by each of them affect each other or the interaction in any way.If so,what is it physical ...
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0answers
22 views

Is it possible for quasiparticles to form charge density wave of quasiparticles?

What if the quasiparticle has fractional charge? -----UPDATE------ For example, 1d kink has e/2 charge, if view kink like electrons in 1d (we know there is 1d charge density wave of electrons), is ...
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0answers
31 views

Interactions with high helicities particles

As it can be shown, there are no interacting helicity-3 (and higher) particles (i.e., massless spin-3 or higher particles) in soft limit (small momentums of emitting particles of given helicity). Сan ...
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3answers
244 views

Relativity and photon interactions

A particle's interaction (with anything it can interact with) can be thought of as it making a measurement of the physical quantity associated with the interaction, (e.g. electric field in case of the ...
4
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2answers
99 views

Why are the “coupling constants” constant?

The coupling constants (in the gauge theory) fix an inner product on the lie algebra of the gauge group and we use it to define strength of the fields. we are using ad-invariant inner products which ...
5
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2answers
373 views

How general relativity gets to an inverse-square law

I understand that a general interpretation of the $1/r^2$ interactions is that virtual particles are exchanged, and to conserve their flux through spheres of different radii, one must assume the ...
4
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3answers
209 views

Could Dark Matter particles that don't couple to quarks or leptons have been produced?

With what we know about physics, is it possible that when the universe 'began', around when quarks and leptons were produced, another particle, which doesn't couple to either quarks, leptons or ...
4
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0answers
63 views

Why are interactions always mediated via bosons (as opposed to fermions)? [duplicate]

Weak, Strong and electromagnetic force are mediated via bosons. I've come across the Walecka-model where the exchange particles are $\sigma$ and $\omega$ mesons; bosons again. why are interactions ...
6
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1answer
150 views

Why will two bubbles floating on water surface attract each other?

Two identical bubbles floating on water surface will form clumps, according to the "cheerio effect". But what's the detail about the force? It's necessary to calculate the shape of water surface, in ...
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3answers
922 views

How is it possible for objects to travel faster than the speed of sound when particles interact at the speed of sound

First of all, I am sorry if this is a stupid question but: I've heard that atoms interact with each other at the speed of sound (when you for instance push a chair, the atoms collide with each other ...
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1answer
28 views

Collision of a heavy charged particle with an electron at rest - Deduction

When I was studying Nuclear Physics I saw this formula about interaction of radiation with matter. The book mentioned that when considering a elastic collision of a heavy charged particle of mass $M$ ...
3
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2answers
183 views

What is an “Interaction Hamiltonian”

I'm an undergraduate reading up on some quantum physics so that I can help out more in the lab that I'm working in this summer. In the book I'm reading (Shankar's "Principles of Quantum Mechanics") I ...
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5answers
6k views

How exactly does gravity work?

The electromagnetic force and strong and weak forces require particles like photons and gluons. But in case of gravity there is no such particle found. Every mass bearing object creates a ...
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0answers
38 views

How to prove that identical particles are attracted or repelled in a given spin-s interaction theory?

Let's assume that we have integer spin interaction theory (EM field, linearized gravity, arbitrary gauge spin s theory). How to prove the consequence that in interaction theory with spin $s = 2n$ two ...
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1answer
63 views

What is the leading order Feynman diagram for nucleon-anti-nucleon annihilation into two mesons ($\psi^{\dagger} \psi \to \phi\phi$)?

I am working with a standard basic scalar Yukawa theory. I.e. the only interaction term is $-g\psi^\dagger\psi\phi$, where the $\phi$ field quanta are the mesons, the $\psi$ field quanta are the ...
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1answer
47 views

Is glass considered as a linear optical medium?

My research, which is mainly related to communication, involves the use of optical sources (mainly lasers). However, my background in photonics and optics is not yet solid, so my question might be a ...
1
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1answer
81 views

From a cross section to a probability

This is homework problem: Given the cross-section of a neutrino-electron scattering, what is the probability for a solar neutrino to scatter with a electron as it goes through the center of the Earth? ...
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2answers
41 views

Do molecular bounded systems shield or reduce neutron cross-sections?

When talking about neutron cross-sections, literature is usually investigating isolated cases of Neutron + Atom. Here, the abundance of hydrogen is dominating neutron fluxes through material. I ...
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0answers
22 views

Is there a finite frequency of physical interactions?

If particles use gauge bosons to convey information about various forces then is there something like a finite "refresh rate" at which they update information about themselves?
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0answers
55 views

Actions at a distance vs. contact interaction

The ancestors could not imagine an action at a distance (in German: "Fernwirkung"). Today physicists don't take serious its opposite anymore (in German: "Kontaktwechselwirkung"). So my first question ...
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1answer
83 views

How do magnetic objects exhibit attraction/repulsion across empty space?

Magnets will attract or repel over a distance before physically touching each other. What makes this effect possible? My best guess is that the forces generated by the angular momentum of the ...
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0answers
77 views

Five-component field

Recently I was reading about 5-component field $(\varphi , \psi_{\mu})$, for which $$ \hat {p}^{\mu} \varphi = mc\psi^{\mu}, \quad \hat {p}_{\mu}\psi^{\mu} = mc\varphi . $$ This field refers to the ...
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0answers
65 views

Calculating the Neutron Stopping Power of complex materials

Is there a fast and convenient way of calculating the neutron stopping power of materials, consisting of multiple elements (e.g. doped crystals) without the need for Monte Carlo Simulation, that is ...
2
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1answer
302 views

How do electrons and photons interact?

Two electrons, or an electron and a proton, interact with each other because of the Coulomb potential, which can also be seen in the Schrödinger equation (which is the equation that describes the ...
3
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1answer
144 views

Diagonalizing Van der Waals Hamiltonian

In Kittel's Solid State Physics, he attempts to find the energy exchange due to the van der Waals interaction. He starts by writing the hamiltonian: two oscillators with coordinates $x_1$ and $x_2$ ...
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1answer
113 views

Expectation values of interacting fields

I was motivated to ask this question by the equality claimed in equation 10.3.3 of Weinberg's volume 1 of QFT books. My interpretation of that, If $O_s$ is a quantum field of spin $s$, $\psi_s$ is ...
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0answers
85 views

Exotic coupling

I have encountered the minimal coupling between a field and charges before $$H = \frac{1}{2m}(p-qA)^2,$$ whereby I am considering the classical case. The description minimal leads me to ask if ...
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0answers
41 views

dispersion relation in presence of a potential

Let there be a particle in a step potential: if its energy $E$ is higher than the step $V_0$, then it will have the momentum $\sqrt{2m(E-V_0)}$ and no more $\sqrt{2mE}$. (See ...
0
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1answer
59 views

What defines the interaction strength of a particle (massless or not) with matter?

Generally, talking about photons, the shorter the wavelength, the higher the interaction with matter. I doubt that I really understand why this happens. What about other massless particles? And ...
3
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0answers
124 views

Feynman rule for deriative interaction: an example

Consider a theory for a finite number of real scalar fields $\phi _i$ with interaction terms of the form $$ -\lambda _{ijk}\phi _i\partial _\mu \phi _j\partial ^\mu \phi _k, $$ with the sum over ...
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1answer
94 views

Which interaction is the responsible for long-range magnetism?

I'm taking solid state physics, subject mostly based on Ashcroft-Mermin's "solid state physics". Yesterday I sat for an exam and there was a question I couldn' t even answer: "Which interaction is ...
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2answers
198 views

Potential in Quantum field theory

I studied free particle field like Dirac field and Klein Gordon field. My question is about interaction. How can I put a potential term in the Lagrangian density? $\mathcal{L} ...
2
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1answer
188 views

Why Does Knife Cuts?

Why is it that when we cut bread or anything else with a knife, the less effective way to cut it is just by pressing on it from above? And is it true that we can cut things with knife because of the ...
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7answers
455 views

Macroscopic laws which haven't been derived from microscopic laws

Can you think of examples where a macroscopic law coexists with a fully known microscopic law, but the former hasn't been derived from the latter (yet)? Or maybe a rule of thumb, which works but ...
2
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0answers
71 views

In QFT, how can it be shown that the field out, ${\phi_{out}}$, is a free field if the field in, ${\phi_{in}}$, is a free field?

In the Dirac picture of QFT interacting fields, if the field in, ${\phi_{in}}$, is a free field, then I know that the field out, ${\phi_{out}}$ should also be a free field. How can this be shown? ...
3
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1answer
444 views

Are fundamental forces conservative?

I wonder whether fundamental forces are conservative. First of all, I'm not sure if we can talk about conservative forces, since to study electromagnetism, weak and strong interactions we need QFT. ...
0
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1answer
67 views

Definition: Coupling [closed]

What does it mean to say that 2 fields are coupled? More generally, what does "coupling" mean?
2
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0answers
71 views

Adiabatic theorem in the regime of quantum optics

I am wondering whether there is a version of adiabatic theorem in the regime of quantum optics. My understanding of quantum optics involves with the interaction between photon and atom. This ...
1
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1answer
283 views

How does the dressed Klein-Gordon propagator look in position space?

The free Klein-Gordon propagator in momentum space $\sim (p^2-m^2+i\epsilon)^{-1}$ has just a single pole at $p^2=m^2$. The passage to Fourier space is difficult but possible. The result is very ...
4
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2answers
193 views

Non-local Lagrangian contact interaction

Conside a contact interaction given by a delta function on their worldlines. Use a gauge fixed Lagrangian for two point particles in terms of their proper times $t$ and $t^{\prime}$. Is it possible to ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

How fair is it to say that all chemistry arises from failures of the ideal gas law?

I was reading here about how the ideal gas law assumes point masses and non-interaction. Is it fair to say that all chemistry arises from failures of that? Of course, such a sweeping generalization ...
3
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1answer
219 views

Deriving Feynman Rules (with the presence of a gluon field strength tensor)

If I have a Lagrangian of the form: $$ \mathcal{L} = k \bar{\psi} \varepsilon^{\mu \nu} \lambda^a \phi G^a_{\mu \nu} + h.c. $$ [where $\phi, \psi$ are fermions, $\lambda^a$ are Gellmann matrices, ...
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3answers
172 views

What is the cause the light is affected by gravity? [duplicate]

I know that photons have no mass and that a photons exist only moving at the speed of light. So what is the cause that a massive astronomical object can bend a ray of light? I have two thoughts, but I ...
6
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2answers
778 views

How do Leptons arise from Lambda decay?

I have a question for an assignment: Use your understanding of the quark model of hadrons and the boson model of the weak nuclear interaction to explain how leptons can arise from lambda decay, ...
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1answer
107 views

Interacting particles

We are familiar with the grand partition function for the grand canonical ensemble. This makes me wonder: what kinds of modifications would be required if the particles interacted? Thanks.
3
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1answer
347 views

Gell-Mann Low Theorem and Vacuum Energy

I know that the sum of vacuum bubbles can be related to the Vacuum energy, but I'm trying to understand how this follows from the Gell-Mann Low theorem/equation. My question will use equations from ...
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1answer
992 views

How to measure a solid-solid surface energy?

Many techniques exist to measure the surface energy between a liquid and a liquid or a liquid and a gas (see e.g. the wiki page). Methods to measure the surface energy between a solid and a fluid are ...