The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
50 views

Photon has energy but no mass [duplicate]

The photons energy is defined as Plancks contant multiplied by the frequency of the light wawe it represents. However Einstein states that the total energy of a particle with rest mass m is m times c ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Creation of momentum on vertex (quantum field theory)

For a an interaction term like $g(\overline{\psi} \gamma^\mu \psi) \partial_\mu \phi$ in which $\psi$ is a Dirac spinor and $\phi$ a scalar field (d=4), should we expect this vertex to have a momentum ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Newton's third law at the quantum level? [closed]

let's look at force at the atomic level to understand the newtons third law of motion. I'll use Helium atoms as an example. Now imagine we start with one atom HE2 stationary, and throw another atom ...
6
votes
0answers
94 views

How do proteins perform their function? [closed]

Let's, for example, take a ribosome. It is an enzyme that is in turn just a molecule that must follow the laws of physics. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it can be looked upon as a molecular machine ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

How can a net force of 0 still lead to movement and how is movement possible with interaction pairs? [duplicate]

So I always thought of movement as interaction pairs. For example, I thought that a rocket moves by applying a force of hot exhaust gases, which then apply a reaction force back on the rocket ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Propagator with derivative interaction

I work with this interaction Lagrangian density $$\mathcal{L}_{int} = \mathcal{L}_{int}^{(1)} + \mathcal{L}_{int}^{(2)} + {\mathcal{L}_{int}^{(2)}}^\dagger = ia\bar{\Psi}\gamma^\mu\Psi Z_\mu ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Generating functional for free and interacting theories [closed]

I'm asking probably a stupid question. We define the generating functional for free theories as $$ Z_0[J] = \int D \psi e^{i\int d^4x \left[ L_0(x) + J_l(x)\psi^l(x) \right]} $$ with $L_0$ the free ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

Question about interacting fields and feynman diagrams [closed]

The picture is taken from Chapter 4: 'Interacting Fields and Feynman Diagrams in An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory by Peskin and Schroeder. There is a two point correlation function ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

How is dark matter detected?

What methods do we use to detect Dark Matter? If I understand correctly, due to lack of electromagnetic interaction it should be able to phase through normal matter nearly like through void - since ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Interaction Hamiltonian and shifts

When we quantize a free field theory, we set $\phi(x)$ to be the operators and we take the Fourier transform to determine the creation and annihilation operators $a_\omega,a^\dagger_\omega$ such that ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

How can we get the interaction hamilton $H_\text{int}$ from the Lagrange $L$?

After we quantize the free field we continue on determining the form of $H$. We can impose, by example: $$H=H_0+\lambda V_\text{int}$$ My question is, can we determine $H_\text{int}$ by the ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Are there any universal forces which are cartesian in nature? [closed]

I was recently talking with someone about how I think the whole Cartesian xyz understanding of the universe evolved from animals thinking earth was flat. They could get along fine without having to ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

What does Kaluza-Klein theory say about the attraction/repulsion of opposite/same charges?

Since Kaluza-Klein theory is made out of general relativity - a gravitational theory in 4 dimensions which is only attractive, then how does it takes into account the attraction/repulsion of ...
7
votes
2answers
181 views

Yukawa interaction between Dirac particles is universally attractive?

Can anyone provide me a specific reference to (or supply themselves) the derivation of the fact that the Yukawa interaction$$\mathcal{L}_{\text{int}} = -g\overline{\psi} \psi \phi$$between Dirac ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Can quantum mechanics, general relativity and all physical theories be reduced to geometry? [duplicate]

I was told by my, perhaps ignorant (that is for you to decide), teacher that "all physical theories can be reduced to geometry in the manner of Newton's Principia/Euclid's Elements, however, due to ...
3
votes
2answers
117 views

Feynman diagram for attractive forces

I’m looking at Feynman diagrams for attractive forces and I'm thoroughly confused. Below are three diagrams from HyperPhysics: These all illustrate instances where the forces are attractive. ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

Is this the correct way to obtain $<f|i>$ term in $\phi^4$ interaction theory? [closed]

Lets first write the expectation value of the fields in the interaction picture; $$ ...
0
votes
1answer
122 views

Propagator and probability amplitude that a particle propagates

My QFT knowledge has very much rusted and i got confused by these few lines from Peskin and Schroeder: p.27: " [..] the amplitude for a particle to propagate from $y$ to $x$ is $\langle 0| \phi(x) ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Do we actually understand what the forces are?

I'm not being cheeky. I'm not looking for a mathematical explanation of how to measure forces. I'm trying to figure out if humans have yet to understand what is actually happening in the space ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

What is the current theory underlying the concept of fields? [duplicate]

When I went to school I was specifically told that fields are material (they occupy some region in space, and they "exist" there) and continuous. Recently, studying quantum physics I came across the ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Reason behind fundamental forces

Can anyone please explain the basic most fundamental reasons behind fundamental forces, i.e. what causes electromagnetic, nuclear and gravitational forces.
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Why bremsstrahlung occurs only with the nuclei? Why not with the electrons?

In many books I read that bremsstrahlung effect (for e+) only occur when the electron goes near the atomic nuclei. Why is not possible when cross near an atomic electron? Thanks,
0
votes
2answers
315 views

Can all fundamental forces be repulsive?

If the electric force can be attractive (with opposite charges) or repulsive (same charges), and the magnetic force acts like this too, can all forces be repulsive in some cases? For example, could ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Interactions of light with the air

This is an interesting thought which I had when driving home today looking in my wing mirrors. If you are driving a car and looking in your, say, right wing mirror, you see an image of the car ...
7
votes
1answer
324 views

Källén–Lehmann spectral representation for massless particle?

Is it possible to write down a KL-like formula for massless particles (in particular, the photon)? The usual proof of the theorem assumes (see ...
3
votes
0answers
89 views

Is the phrase “coupling constant” interchangable with “ strength of interactions”?

Can I use the terms coupling constant and strength of interactions, interchangeably, or are there more subtleties to the term coupling constant that I am not aware of? Coupling Constants from ...
1
vote
2answers
94 views

How force is transferred from one body to another

If there are 3 coins , namely 1 , 2 and 3 as in figure. When coin $1$ strike coin $2$ ,the coin $2$ passes the force to coin $3$ and the coin $3$ moves away. Case :1 How does this happen? What ...
6
votes
2answers
273 views

Peskin eqn 7.2 contradiction

They state $$\langle\Omega|\phi(x)|\lambda_{\bf p}\rangle=\langle\Omega|e^{iP\cdot x}\phi(0)e^{-iP\cdot x}|\lambda_{\bf p}\rangle \tag{7.4}$$ where $|\lambda_{\bf p}\rangle$ is a state of momentum ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

Is microcausality a statement about locality?

As far as I understand it locality is the rejection of action-at-a-distance. By this I mean that in a given frame of reference at a given instant of time (in that reference frame), two physical ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

How is the EM force exchanged over long distances?

The Situation Imagine we place two charged objects a very far distance apart, essentially making them point charges. How does the EM force interact between the two point charges if virtual photons ...
4
votes
0answers
98 views

Coincidence of spacetime events & Lorentz invariance

Am I correct in thinking that if two spacetime events are coincident in one frame of reference, then they are coincident in all frames of reference, i.e. coincidence of spacetime events is a Lorentz ...
4
votes
1answer
193 views

Lorentz invariance, energy-momentum conservation & the locality of interactions

I have been reading these notes ("Minkowski Spacetime: A Hundred Years Later", by Vesselin Petkov) 1, in which the author states (in the middle of the text on page 137) that "The only Lorentz ...
0
votes
0answers
84 views

Lagrangians densities & interactions in field theory

To avoid ambiguity, this question pertains to the construction of Lagrangian densities (including interaction terms) in terms of their values at single points in spacetime. In classical mechanics in ...
2
votes
1answer
109 views

Why is the free field operator the same with interactions present?

In free scalar theory, the field would have the expression $$\phi(x)=\int \frac{d^3p}{(2\pi)^3\sqrt{2E_p}}a_p e^{-ip_\mu x^\mu}+a^\dagger_p e^{ip_\mu x^\mu}$$ Suppose we have an interaction with a ...
1
vote
2answers
368 views

How do gauge boson interact with elementary particles?

We know that gauge bosons are the force carriers of fundamental interactions, but how do the gauge bosons themselves interact with particles?
15
votes
1answer
1k views

Do neutrinos refract?

The most benign of interactions is refraction. While neutrinos rarely interact with matter in a sense like the photoelectric effect, does that mean that they don't refract either?
6
votes
2answers
179 views

In QFT how do you write down the most general interactions?

This past year I took a QFT class and I now feel comfortable solving scattering problems, but I am still a bit perplexed by how physicists write down a Lagrangian in the first place. In particular, ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What is colour-Coulomb interaction?

In several publications (e.g. http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06864) a "colour Coulomb interaction" between quarks was mentioned. What kind of interaction is that, is it electromagnetic or strong?
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Interaction Energy vs Force

I'm having a hard time determining the relationship/differences between interaction energy and forces. Say we have a system of two charged particles. Each particle will exert a force on each other ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Grand potential $\leftrightarrow$ ground state energy of interacting electrons in a solid

I want to calculate the ground state energy $E_0$ of interacting electrons in a solid at $T=0$ via pertubation theory and Feynman diagrams, i.e. I want to understand the connection between the ...
2
votes
2answers
52 views

Ambiguity with reaction equations

I understand that if two particles are on the left hand side of a reaction equation they are said to "interact". For example, $p+e^{-}\rightarrow n+v_e$ is a proton and electron interacting (electron ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Quark decay implies particle decay?

For example, since $$s\rightarrow u+\overline{v_e}+e^{-}$$, then sticking a $\overline{u}$ next to the quarks ($s$ and $u$) we get $$s\overline{u}\rightarrow u\overline{u}+\overline{v_e}+e^{-}$$, ...
3
votes
2answers
372 views

Is there a quark conservation law?

The section on particle interactions in my revision guide says that only the weak interaction can change quark types, e.g. when a neutron changes to a proton the down quarks in the neutron are changed ...
2
votes
2answers
174 views

Do hadrons only interact via strong interaction?

According to my revision guide baryon and mesons always interact via the strong interaction. Does this hold for baryon-baryon interactions? meson-meson? Thanks
0
votes
1answer
55 views

What does “interact via strong force” mean?

I was just wondering if the words "strong force" and "strong interaction" are interchangeable? Also, these are referring to "strong nuclear force", correct? Then what does it mean for particles to ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Klein-Nishina for estimating X-ray cross section

I'm looking at interaction probability for X-rays with water and DNA, and recently have starting reading up on the Klein-Nishina identities for differential cross section. When integrated over all ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Does the force of releasing the latch of a spring-latch contraption affects the force generated by the spring?

There is this contraption in my class, where a rod is attached to a latch and a spring. By pulling the latch back behind a piece of metal, the latch is secured, the rod if pulled back and the spring ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Why is gravity so weak? [duplicate]

How does physics explain the enormous disparity between the gravitational scale and the typical mass scale of the elementary particles? In other words, why is gravity so much weaker than the other ...
1
vote
1answer
184 views

First-order EM Feynman diagram?

Is there any 1st order electromagnetic Feynman diagram? I.e. a process whose probability is just $\propto \alpha_{EM}$? If not, is there any physical reason why? We always need at least two particles ...
1
vote
2answers
530 views

How to tell the order of a Feynman diagram?

How can we know the order of a Feynman diagram just from the pictorial representation? Is it the number of vertices divided by 2? For example, I know that electnro-positron annihilaiton is first ...