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5
votes
2answers
127 views

In QFT how do you write down the most general interactions?

This past year I took a QFT class and I now feel comfortable solving scattering problems, but I am still a bit perplexed by how physicists write down a Lagrangian in the first place. In particular, ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What is colour-Coulomb interaction?

In several publications (e.g. http://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.06864.pdf) a "colour Coulomb interaction" between quarks was mentioned. What kind of interaction is that, is it electromagnetic or strong?
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Interaction Energy vs Force

I'm having a hard time determining the relationship/differences between interaction energy and forces. Say we have a system of two charged particles. Each particle will exert a force on each other ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Grand potential $\leftrightarrow$ ground state energy of interacting electrons in a solid

I want to calculate the ground state energy $E_0$ of interacting electrons in a solid at $T=0$ via pertubation theory and Feynman diagrams, i.e. I want to understand the connection between the ...
2
votes
2answers
42 views

Ambiguity with reaction equations

I understand that if two particles are on the left hand side of a reaction equation they are said to "interact". For example, $p+e^{-}\rightarrow n+v_e$ is a proton and electron interacting (electron ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Quark decay implies particle decay?

For example, since $$s\rightarrow u+\overline{v_e}+e^{-}$$, then sticking a $\overline{u}$ next to the quarks ($s$ and $u$) we get $$s\overline{u}\rightarrow u\overline{u}+\overline{v_e}+e^{-}$$, ...
3
votes
2answers
159 views

Is there a quark conservation law?

The section on particle interactions in my revision guide says that only the weak interaction can change quark types, e.g. when a neutron changes to a proton the down quarks in the neutron are changed ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Do hadrons only interact via strong interaction?

According to my revision guide baryon and mesons always interact via the strong interaction. Does this hold for baryon-baryon interactions? meson-meson? Thanks
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What does “interact via strong force” mean?

I was just wondering if the words "strong force" and "strong interaction" are interchangeable? Also, these are referring to "strong nuclear force", correct? Then what does it mean for particles to ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Klein-Nishina for estimating X-ray cross section

I'm looking at interaction probability for X-rays with water and DNA, and recently have starting reading up on the Klein-Nishina identities for differential cross section. When integrated over all ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Does the force of releasing the latch of a spring-latch contraption affects the force generated by the spring?

There is this contraption in my class, where a rod is attached to a latch and a spring. By pulling the latch back behind a piece of metal, the latch is secured, the rod if pulled back and the spring ...
1
vote
0answers
89 views

Why is gravity so weak? [duplicate]

How does physics explain the enormous disparity between the gravitational scale and the typical mass scale of the elementary particles? In other words, why is gravity so much weaker than the other ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

First-order EM Feynman diagram?

Is there any 1st order electromagnetic Feynman diagram? I.e. a process whose probability is just $\propto \alpha_{EM}$? If not, is there any physical reason why? We always need at least two particles ...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

How to tell the order of a Feynman diagram?

How can we know the order of a Feynman diagram just from the pictorial representation? Is it the number of vertices divided by 2? For example, I know that electnro-positron annihilaiton is first ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Do interaction free experiments violate Quantum Physics?

Although I know that interaction free experiments come under Quantum Physics, Don't the kind of violate the Heisenberg uncertainty principle? Because you get a value without interacting with the ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Why doesn't a quantum pairwise Hamiltonian couple states in which more than one interaction occurs?

This question is about the standard quantum mechanical pairwise interaction Hamiltonian. I'll phrase it in terms of an example using Rydberg atoms, but you could just as well imagine spins (for ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Non-linearity and self-coupling of gravity

I have heard that non-linearity of Einstein's field equations has to do with the fact that gravity self-couples. What does non-linearity have to do with self-coupling?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Interaction Hamiltonian in the interaction picutre

The Schrodinger and Heisenberg pictures make sense to me. But the interaction picture which is a hybrid of the two does not. Author of this text first splits the Hamiltonian up as ...
0
votes
1answer
134 views

What are the equations for the weak and strong forces?

What are the equations for the strong and weak force, like how for the Electrostatics the equation is $F_c= k*Q*q/(r*r)$. I understand to an extend what the strong and weak forces are. However, I ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Potential Energy of Interaction Between a Sphere and a Particle Formula Derivation [closed]

A sphere of radius R has density described by ρ=ρ(r). Derive equation for pontetial energy of interaction between the sphere and some point particle of mass m which is at distance r from the center of ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

How do photons mediate (or create) a force?

Is there a somewhat intuitive explanation as to why the exchange of a photon between two particles causes a force between those particles? Is there a difference in the way massless and massive ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

What is the phase-amplitude numerical method?

What is the phase-amplitude numerical method? I heard its used to calculate long range interactions numerically, but I cannot find any papers discussing its method of implementation.
2
votes
1answer
54 views

What is it that Lagrangian density with only bilinear terms always corresponds to free field theory?

Is there an intuitive proof of this fact? (Maybe connected in some way to Central Limit Theorem?).
4
votes
1answer
77 views

In the context of quantum field theory, what does it mean to “couple” something?

Suppose I have the following Lagrangian density \begin{equation} \mathcal{L} = - \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu} \end{equation} The lecture notes I an reading suggest if I want to "couple to ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Force and Advanced Physics: E.g. is gravity really a force? [duplicate]

I'm kinda beginner in physics but recently I've been studying really interesting concepts like the four fundamental forces and General Relativity. I started thinking that there is a weird ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

How do quantum fields really couple?

The term "coupling" between quantum fields refers to certain terms in the Lagrangian (density) $\mathcal{L}$ where the respective field operators appear together, e.g. $g\phi^\dagger\psi $ with ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

crystal momentum conservation

Electrons on 1D chain interacting with each other $$ H = \sum_{k_4,k_3, k_2, k_1} V(k_4-k_1) c_{k_4}^{\dagger}c_{k_3}^{\dagger}c_{k_2}c_{k_1}\delta_{k4+k3=k2+k1;\text{mod}~G}$$ where $G$ is ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Why does the classical electrodynamics Lagrangian density equation have a “field” term and an “interaction” term?

On Wikipedia's page on classical electrodynamics, they state the Lagrangian density equation as follows \begin{equation} \mathcal{L} = \mathcal{L}_{\text{field}} + \mathcal{L}_{\text{int}} = ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

Static fields - are properties of single objects, or do exist only between two interacting objects?

I apologize for seeming to return on a same question, but I don't have the feeling that the things are clear. In a former question, "where is the potential energy stored", the conclusion was that ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Semantics: alternative word for long-ranged interaction? [closed]

I am working on wording for a report. I need to a word to describe long ranged interaction that is constant in strength. But I am aware that people sometimes use 'long-ranged' to mean decaying ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Is there such a thing as an interaction radius for molecules?

My question is about estimating the radius of influence between two molecules; picture some mixture, comprised of water, oxygen gas (in small concentrations) and a molecule we denote $G$. In the ...
1
vote
3answers
153 views

Relation between wavelength and system size

We always say that when a given light wave interacts with atoms bound in a molecule, only waves with wavelength close to the inter-atomic-spacing are able to probe the system. In other context ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

Why does heat lose its energy as we get further away?

Why does heat lose its energy dramatically as I move back? Say I have a fire around 0.5 meters in front of me, I can clearly feel the heat, however, as I move even very slightly back, say 1 meter ...
3
votes
2answers
117 views

Hamiltonian for a Lagrangian with coupling

I am dealing with the following Lagrangian density $$\mathscr{L}_{em}= -\frac{1}{2}\rho\omega^2 u^2 +\frac{1}{2}\nabla u:\Sigma :\nabla ...
4
votes
1answer
85 views

Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?

If magnetic monopoles existed it would not be the case - the forces on an electron and a magnetic monopole passing by each other would be at right angles to the vector connecting the two particles! ...
1
vote
1answer
194 views

Why is the gravitational force $10^{38}$ times smaller than the strong nuclear force?

Also, why is the weak interaction force $10^7$ times smaller than the strong nuclear force?
20
votes
6answers
898 views

Simple example showing why measurement & interaction are different

Does someone know of a clear (pedagogical) example where one can really see(with the math) where interaction and measurement are not synonymous in quantum mechanics? I know that every measurement ...
5
votes
2answers
121 views

Does String Theory Predict more than Four Forces?

String theory literature tells us that ST predicts the four forces: weak, strong, EM, and gravity. What it fails to tell us is if that's all the forces it predicts. Might there be a fifth force that ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

Validity of the static limit of a dielectric function

In general, the dielectric function $\epsilon(q,\omega)$ reflects the spatial and temporal response of a condensed matter system to an applied potential. If we put an electron into an electron sea, ...
0
votes
2answers
105 views

A model that unifies the strong, EM, weak and gravity forces?

Does there exist such a model that explains the force clusters (their origin, relations between them): the strong, EM, weak and gravity forces?
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Can all fundamental forces be fictitious forces?

After reading many questions, like this and this, I wonder: is it possible to consider also the other fundamental forces, the electroweak interaction and the strong interaction or ultimately the ...
6
votes
2answers
152 views

What are fundamental dimensions used to describe the physical universe? [closed]

I have heard that the universe can be explained in terms of the four fundamental forces. I have also heard it can be explained in terms such as space, time, energy, mass or even motion. To further ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

Does the surface topological order on the boundary of 3D topological insulator also have topological ground state degeneracy?

The boundary of a 3D topological insulator can be fully gapped (under strong interaction) by the surface topological order without breaking the symmetry (see Fidkowski-Chen-Vishwanath, ...
6
votes
2answers
462 views

Can we fully simulate molecular physics?

Is our knowledge of physics complete enough to achieve fully natural simulations of molecular interactions in a computer simulation? How far off are we? Reason for question: I wonder how far we are ...
2
votes
2answers
38 views

The time interval of fundamental interactions?

I extract the below text snippet from our text book: Strong interaction is charge independent.The time interval of such a strong interaction is about $10^{-23} sec$ and it's range is approximately ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

Gravitational force and Electromagnetic force?

I found this interesting note in one of my textbooks, The enormous strength of the electromagnetic force compared to gravity is evident in our daily life. When we hold a book in our hand, we are ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Force-carrying particles instead of forces

Are there physical theories in which notions of particle are used without the concept of force? I know about gauge bosons, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_carrier and ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

A problem regarding the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb tester

To quote wikipedia Step-by-step explanation After being emitted, the photon 'probability' wave will both pass through the first 50% reflecting mirror (take the lower-route) and be reflected ...
1
vote
1answer
132 views

Interaction pictures of Quantum Mechanics

I want to understand the Schrödinger, Heisenberg and interaction picture and have a few questions about them: So in general you have a time-dependent Hamiltonian $H$, as for example the potential may ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

What equation can be used to solve an ideal string/membrane in a non-vacuum medium?

I'm interested in the eigenmodes of the membrane for various mediums, such as vacuum, air, water, etc., which impose a damping effect on the membrane. This cannot be done by merely changing the value ...