Electrical insulators are materials through which electric charge does not flow freely. Insulators have high electrical resistivity.

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Do metals *really* conduct at zero temperature?

The questions is mostly in the title, but might expose another of my misunderstanding of the band structure of solids and how that leads to metals and insulators. If we have a solid, and the fermi ...
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Why Solid Insulators have highest breakdown voltage?

Why does solid insulating materials have a higher breakdown voltage when compared to that of liquids and gases? Can anyone explain this in simple words?
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Static electricity and insulators

I've read that Stephen Gray in his experiments on electricity, he has found that static electricity can be conducted -transferred- through an insulator thread made of silk. So, how could that happen ...
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Movement of electrons in conductors and insulators

In conductors, the electrons can easily move unlike in insulators that prevent them from moving. What properties in conductors and insulators make them act in such way? Is it related to the position ...
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Is it possible for a conductor initially, not to have a charge?

Well I'm confused. The thing that was implanted to me is that when I hear about conductors, some charge is present and it can move freely. Now what I want to know is that is it possible for a ...
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what is the physical significance of dielectric constant and loss tangent?

I want to know that the significance of dielectric constant and loss tangent behaviour. How it characterises the materials. and possible relation between the dielectric constant and polarisation ?
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How to prove R value for insulation?

I ran some tests on different types of insulation. I heated water, and placed it into an insulated box. The temperature was recorded every minute, for the water, as well as the air. The insulation ...
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insulator based gauss law questions

My book is incredibly scarce on insulator based Gauss law questions. Conductors seem to handle themselves pretty simply. Here's a question I'm working on that isn't part of my book. where the radii ...
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Can you calculate the charge after rubbing two objects

If there are two insulators and you rub them together for a long time, is there a way to calculate how much charge should have transferred between them. I'm sure there is some relation to the ...
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Does all electrical insulator can be electrostatically charged?

Does all electrical insulator can be electrostatically charged, or insulator with only dielectric property can? Thank you.
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How can a metal and an insulator have high dielectrics yet one is conducting and one is insulating?

I don't get it: insulators are referred to as dielectrics. The higher the dielectric the higher the insulation(?). But the dielectric constant of metals is considered infinite. Aren't they supposed to ...
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Can I use an IV curve alone to differentiate between metallic, semiconducting and insulating materials?

Assuming the size of the bandgap is expressed as resistance in the IV curve, could I tell between metals, semiconductors an insulators by only doing an IV sweep? For example very high slopes (large $\...
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Will charge transfer without friction

I know rubbing two objects of different materials together will result in a negative charge on whichever material has a higher electron affinity. However, I was wondering if a negatively charged ...
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When a charged insulator is touched by a conductor, What really happens?

1-how does the conductor get charged although the electrons in the insulator are not free to move? 2-If the conductor material is connected to the earth, Will the insulator be discharged?