Add this Tag for questions on information theory applied to physics, especially in the fields of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, the black hole information paradox, complexity of dynamical and physical systems and questions to do with whether information is conserved by physical systems. ...

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2answers
154 views

Bekenstein bound for electron?

Using the Wikipedia version of the Bekenstein bound, and substituting the Wikipedia values for electron mass and radius, one obtains 0.0662 bits. Does this really mean that a system, any system, ...
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2answers
274 views

Proof of conservation of information [duplicate]

After listening of some lectures of Leonard Susskind about black holes, he mentioned that conservation of information is one of the foundations of physics. After searching the web I cannot seem to ...
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2answers
273 views

Information Loss in annihilation

The concept of information loss is usually discussed with respect to a black hole. My understanding is that whatever matter you put into the black hole, it has only 3 "hairs" and so one doesn't know, ...
5
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1answer
81 views

Holevo Information and Quantum Mutual Information

This question is about the difference between Quantum Mutual Information and Holevo Information of quantum channels. From http://arxiv.org/pdf/1004.2495.pdf equation 7 we know that the sum of quantum ...
5
votes
2answers
241 views

What reflective media do laser shows use?

I am having a hard time in finding out what exact light media laser shows use. I am trying to build a laser show myself. I know that the laser light is reflected off these particles in such a way that ...
4
votes
3answers
333 views

Speed of Dark experiment, does it *really* travel faster than light? [duplicate]

I have seen many folks doing this Moon shadow experiment concluding that shadow from point A on the Moon can travel to point B on the Moon faster than light. What I fail to understand here (and I am ...
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3answers
1k views

Sending information faster than light

If I could ever send my friend any information faster than light it would violate causality. If he just guesses the information and acts on it before he could ever recieve it, everything is fine. What ...
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2answers
1k views

Where does information go if thermodynamic death?

Often read that until Hawking the black holes were introducing a problem with information. Allegedly information should be unable disappear, while this was happening in classic black holes. What ...
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4answers
678 views

Entropy and Information

Several posts and my classes in thermodynamics equate increase in entropy with loss of information. Shannon clearly showed that the information content of a message is zero when its entropy is zero ...
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2answers
309 views

Is this theory about Universe and information true?

I recently saw this video about information and randomness. At some point, it states that a completely predictable universe would infringe the second law of thermodynamics, because it would imply that ...
4
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1answer
301 views

No hair theorem and black hole entropy

The no hair theorem says that black holes rapidly converge to a state that is completely described just by their mass, spin and charge. Black hole thermodynamics says that the black hole entropy is ...
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2answers
321 views

Entropy: two explanations for the same quantity?

I studied thermodynamics and I saw the following definition for entropy: $$ \Delta S = \int_1^2 \frac{\text{d}Q}{T} $$ that we use to calculate $\Delta S$ for different types of transformations. In ...
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2answers
186 views

Maxwell demon with memory storage

Let's consider a classical Maxwell demon as described in wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_demon. It spends energy for measuring velocities and coordinates of some particles and uses the ...
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1answer
92 views

What is the interpretatation of individual contributions to the Shannon entropy?

If $X=\{ x_1,x_2,\dots,x_n\}$ are assigned probabilities $p(x_i)$, then the entropy is defined as $\sum_{i=1}^n\ p(x_i)\,\cdot\left(-\log p(x_i)\right).$ One may call $I(x_i)=-\log p(x_i)$ the ...
4
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1answer
87 views

Is there a lower bound on energy needed to transfer one bit of information?

Let's say we want to transmit information between to stations (points in space). Is there a minimal energy required to transfer a single bit of information, assuming that we tolerate that the bit ...
4
votes
2answers
465 views

What is the mechanism for fast scrambling of information by black holes?

Sekino and Susskind have argued that black holes scramble information faster than any quantum field theory in this paper. What is the mechanism for such scrambling?
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2answers
135 views

What is the black hole information paradox really? [closed]

Preliminaries What is the black hole information paradox really? Is it a sophisticated way to ponder and debate the existence of an operator on the boundary that can tease out the interior of a ...
4
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3answers
108 views

The speed of information

Does this expression have any rigorous meaning? Intuitively ,I feel that information about an event or a system in my environment propagates to me at a certain "speed". Does this correspond to ...
4
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2answers
161 views

Knotted token-ring network

Suppose we have a rigid token-ring network. An observer at any node can seemingly determine the angular momentum of the network by measuring the time it takes for a packet to travel around the ring ...
3
votes
1answer
375 views

Microsecond trading with neutrinos

The Spread Networks corporation recently laid down 825 miles of fiberoptic cable between New York and Chicago, stretching across Pennsylvania, for the sole purpose of reducing the latency of ...
3
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3answers
446 views

Has anyone ever tried to formulate physics based on computer science or information processing?

Some physicists and university researchers say it's possible to test the theory that our entire universe exists inside a computer simulation, like in the 1999 film "The Matrix." In 2003, University of ...
3
votes
2answers
296 views

Number of bits needed to express physical laws?

What is the minimum number of bits that would be needed to express a given physical law, like the law of universal gravitation? How many bits are needed to express each of the four fundamental forces? ...
3
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3answers
254 views

The role of context in information theory

Consider Hofstaedter’s jukebox analogy: A jukebox that contains only one record, but many different record players, each of which interprets that one record in a different way to produce an entirely ...
3
votes
1answer
484 views

How large is the information collected from an inverse femtobarn of collisions?

I ran into this while looking at measures of humongous amounts of data. How does the information (data) collected in an inverse femtobarn exposure compare to a gigabyte of data ?
3
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1answer
150 views

Understanding the quantum eraser from a quantum information stand point

Is there a way to understand the quantum eraser experiment in terms of quantum information? In particular, is there a quantum circuit that would function as a quantum eraser experiment? The issue I'm ...
3
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2answers
723 views

Quantum Teleportation Fidelity

I understand that quantum teleportation fidelity is the overlap of the initial quantum state with the teleported quantum state. If the teleportation is perfect, then the fidelity would equal 1 or 100% ...
3
votes
1answer
330 views

Wasn't the Hawking Paradox solved by Einstein?

I just watched a BBC Horizon episode where they talked about the Hawking Paradox. They mentioned a controversy about information being lost but I couldn't get my head around this. Black hole ...
3
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2answers
194 views

Why the self-information is -log(p(m))?

Why is self-information given by $-\log(p(m))$? Shannon derived a measure of information content called the self-information or "surprisal" of a message $m$: $$I(m) = \log \left( \frac{1}{p(...
3
votes
1answer
145 views

Do monochromatic waves carry information?

The answer is negative according to http://www.mathpages.com/home/kmath528/kmath528.htm It should also be remembered that a perfectly monochromatic wave carries no information, and therefore is ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Should entropy have units and temperature in terms of energy? [duplicate]

I've been thinking about entropy for a while and why it is a confusing concept and many references are filled with varying descriptions of something that is a statistical probability (arrows of time, ...
3
votes
1answer
173 views

Definition of Information in Information Theory

I am not sure in which SE site I have to put this question. But since I have learnt Shannon Entropy in the context of Statistical Physics, I am putting this question here. In the case of Shannon ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

Infinite bits to describe a qubit

In the Quantum Computation book by Nielsen and Chuang, the authors write in the context of quantum teleportation "Even if she (Alice) did know the state |w> , describing it precisely takes an ...
3
votes
4answers
208 views

Is it possible to learn about an event that occurred outside of your observable universe?

I have mixed intuitions about this. On one hand, nothing can travel faster than the speed of light and if there is enough space between you and an event then a signal will get stuck in the middle of ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

Does the Bekenstein entropy bound present problems for unitarity in cosmological models that invovle a collapse or bounce?

If we expect the Bekenstein bound, or something like it, to hold in a collapsing universe, will that not eventually force us to accept some loss of information, or is there something I'm missing?
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0answers
38 views

Implication of non-positive tripartite information

Hayden et al 2011 showed that tripartite information is non-positive given Ryu-Takanayagi formula. (For definition of tripartite information, see for instance section 4.4 of this paper) Is there ...
3
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1answer
44 views

About the holographic principle

I read at a book this quote "As the degrees of freedom of a particle are the product of all the degrees of freedom of its sub-particles, were a particle to have infinite subdivisions into lower-...
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0answers
64 views

Can Observation change entropy?

I don't know whether this even makes any sense, but if 'observation' can be considered as 'recieving and reading information', can an act of observation (of a system) change (increase or decrease) its ...
3
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0answers
99 views

What is the entropy of a string?

In his The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics (p. 373) Susskind states that the entropy of a string is [...] proportional to its length. ...
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0answers
112 views

What is the energy conversion efficiency of a computation device like a modern CPU? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How efficient is a desktop computer? I believe the energy conversion efficiency of a modern CPU is extremely low, because it dissipates pretty much all of it as heat, which ...
3
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3answers
227 views

Is Bekenstein entropy limit inconsistent with universal continuity?

It is unknown whether the universe is discrete or continuous in its intricate quantum level structure. See for example: Can universal continuity be experimentally falsified? Is the universe finite ...
2
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4answers
330 views

Is amount of entropy subjective?

From all sources I have seen it follows that the proof you can't decrease the amount of entropy in the Universe is given only statistically - the order is just one of the many ways how things can be (...
2
votes
1answer
220 views

Reference paper to support information — energy relation $\left(kT \ln2 \rm\frac{J}{bit}\right)\;.$

In answer to Maxwell's Demon Constant (Information-Energy equivalence) there is stated that one bit of information allows to perform $kT \cdot \ln2$ Joules of work. Which paper supports the thesis?...
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2answers
2k views

Are information conservation and energy conservation related?

as evident from the title, are both, conservation of energy and conservation of information two sides of the same coin?? Is there something more to the hypothesis of hawking's radiation other than ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Quantification of uncertainty, or information loss, when modeling a physical system?

Say I have a physical circuit (say a battery, wires and an incandescent lamp) that I want to model. To model it I could perhaps use: traditional circuit theory some kind of finite element analysis ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Minimum information necessary to represent a pure quantum state

I was thinking about how quantum states are represented for various types of systems, and how the amount of classical information (bits) required to represent a state depends on its basis. Let's take ...
2
votes
1answer
310 views

Physical structures that trap information

I labeled this question "soft" because it might not make any sense. Anyway, what I'm wondering is if there's a notion in physics that deals with the ability of matter to trap information. For ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Is there a definition of relative Renyi entropy?

Is there a Renyi entropy analogue of ``$H(X \vert Y)$" ? If yes then is there any known meaning to that? Googling around I found a few different notions, equation 18 here, http://arxiv.org/abs/...
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2answers
120 views

Superimposed state vs. zero amplitude state

Two equal amplitude wave pulses approaching each other through some medium such as a string may form a region of zero amplitude when they overlap completely. At this point, the location of overlap is ...
2
votes
1answer
173 views

Reconstruction of the initial state from Hawking radiation?

I hear that unitary evolution and information conservation must imply that information about information content that defines the initial state of matter used to create a black hole can be inferred ...
2
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1answer
44 views

What information do we lose when we increase whale songs to our hearing range?

TV documentaries on marine life often feature the evocative sounds of whales communicating with each other (apparently), over very long distances. The frequency of baleen whale sounds ranges from 10 ...