A specific reference frame that describes its coordinates in a manner that does not depend on time and is isotropic.

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Law of inertia, Frames of reference

Ok, we all know that an Inertial frame of reference is defined like this: "An inertial frame of reference is one frame where Newton's First Law holds, therefore, a body has a constant velocity or ...
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49 views

Isotropic of Inertial frame?

My understanding of isotropic is the a particular physics law remain same no matter at what direction I look at it? Now suppose in case of inertial frame, we know that its is homogeneous and ...
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35 views

Will the object spin as the earth spins?

If an object is designed to levitate a few kilometers above the ground, and the point directly below the object on earth is called $A$, as time passes and the earth rotates about its axis, will the ...
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43 views

Frames of Reference in a Rotational System

Imagine two concentric rings with different diameters. One is spinning within the other. There is a small gap between the outer diameter of the inner ring and the inner diameter of outer ring. From ...
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1answer
207 views

Spring rotated in uniform circular motion

Why does a spring stretch when rotated in uniform circular motion? The horizontal rod containing the massless spring(stiffness = k) and block of mass 'm' is rotated uniformly about point P. ...
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1answer
68 views

Contradiction of total energy of a system? [duplicate]

I consider a situation in a system in which an observer is sitting in body of mass $M$ and another observer in a body of mass $2M$, both moving with velocity $v$ towards each other. If observers in ...
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72 views

Is there an absolute accelerated frame of reference?

I know from special relativity and from a little common sense that there is no absolute inertial frame of reference; that is, physics acts the same no matter what velocity you go at. However, that ...
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101 views

Determining the velocity of an inertial frame of reference

Back in grade 12 I was told by my physics teacher that one would have no way of determining the velocity of an inertial frame of reference without comparing it to another (e.g. if a person was in a ...
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3answers
375 views

Are Newton's laws followed in non-inertial frame of references having all their objects and observer moving with same acceleration? [on hold]

Consider a hypothetical scenario. In our universe there are two merry-go-rounds 1 and 2 and a distant planet. There is no other object having mass. There is a robot X on the planet. There are two ...
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4answers
116 views

How does light travel?

How does light travel, does this not contradict the idea that going the speed of light stops time? Because if going the speed of light stops time and light goes the speed of light shouldn't it be dark?...
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105 views

Is temperature a frame dependent quantity? [duplicate]

The temperature of an object is proportional to the average kinetic energy (1/2*m*v^2) of its particles (or molecules), then shouldn't the temperature depend on the frame of reference since v^2 will ...
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216 views

Centrifugal force on a pendulum

Why don't we consider the centrifugal force acting on the bob of a pendulum while drawing the Free Body Diagram of a pendulum? It's also a sort of circular motion.
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82 views

Does it take less time to drop a ball than fire one horizontally (with $90^{\circ}$) [closed]

So I was arguing about this with my friend. If we take two balls and drop one from a certain height H and then fire another one with horizontally with some initial speed from the same height H, which ...
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4answers
790 views

Stone dropped from a moving train

This may look like a stupid question, but it is really getting to me. Imagine a train moving with an acceleration $a$, and a person drops a stone from the window. To an observer on the ground, the ...
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2answers
74 views

Taylor's “Classical mechanics” - inertial balance

I am currently reading John Taylor's "Classical Mechanics" book and I am wondering how does the inertial balance work (as explained in figure 1.2, page 10). The autor says about an inertial balance ...
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5answers
602 views

Twins Paradox - Does ageing depend on motion?

I am trying to understand the Twins Paradox (relativity) and its implications. Can we infer from the Twins Paradox that the ageing process (cell decay or other biological processes) depends on motion?...
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2answers
739 views

Can a pilot in a small spaceship feel G force in space?

I am not really good in physics so I might be wrong at some points, but here is the situation. Consider a spaceship of the size of a fighter plane. And like a fighter plane, the ship is very mobile. ...
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3answers
285 views

Fundamental paradox with Newton's Law of Gravity?

This is my first post here, but I've been struggling with this problem in my head since I studied physics at school when I was 14 (30 years ago!). There seems to be a fundamental paradox with Newton'...
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80 views

Shape and even connectedness of accelerating components in SR is frame dependent?

In some inertial frame consider a disk of radius 1 lightyear at rest. Then along the edge of the disk there are some people in spacesuits at rest hovering right above the disk (which has negligible ...
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2answers
88 views

Derive the velocity-additon formula from the Lorentz transformation

In a Euclidian world the sum $s$ of two velocities $v$ and $u$ is so such that $s = v + u$. However, in the world of special relativity that's not the case. Instead, the velcity vector sum $s$ is ...
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1answer
99 views

Time dilation and relativity paradox? [duplicate]

I've come across a weird paradox that I can't answer, I will explain it via the following thought experiment: There is a space-train and an observer 1 light year apart with synchronised clocks. The ...
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1answer
77 views

How can we find velocity, acceleration etc, of a revolving particle with respect to an observer inside the circle(not at center)

A particle is revolving in horizontal a circle of radius $R$ with constant speed of $|\vec{v}|$ and constant angular velocity $\omega$. There is another observer standing inside the circle, at a ...
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2answers
240 views

Two sets of coordinates each in frames $O$ and $ O' $ (Lorentz transformation)

Suppose inertia frame $O'$ is moving at velocity $v$ relative to inertia frame $O$. Let the coordinate systems of $O$ be denoted by $(x,y,z)$ and the corresponding one on $O'$ be denoted by $(x',y',z')...
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152 views

Lorentz Transformations understanding

I am wondering whether or not I fully understood what the variables represent in the Lorentz time and distance transformations. What I understand is: t′ is the 'proper time', the time taken to move ...
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3answers
363 views

A question in Special Relativity

In books the equation for length contraction is derived by supposing that the velocity of the spacecraft is the same for both observers. So the question is that, is the velocity really the same for ...
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3answers
236 views

Why can't we find a true inertial frame?

From one book, I read that if we release a ball horizontally on earth, its velocity does change in very accurate observations. If we track its motion, we get full information of its motion (incl. ...
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634 views

What does the first postulate of specially relativity really say?

I know these two versions of the same postulate is saying the same thing. But I failed to connect them. Please help me understand the links between them. version1 The laws of physics are the same ...
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1answer
141 views

Problem conserving 4-momentum at CoM frame in an inelastic collision [closed]

I am confused about the case where mass is not conserved in a collision (not due to relativistic factors). The center of momentum (CoM) frame is not the same before and after the collision. Let's ...
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2answers
94 views

Energy in the Relativistic COM Frame

I have been taught that in Classical Mechanics, the total energy of a system of two particles in the Centre of Mass Frame is given by $$ E_\mathrm{total} = \frac{1}{2}MV^2 + \frac{1}{2}\mu v_r^2 $$ ...
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113 views

Relative Lorentz factor for two shells

Shell 1 is travelling at a speed $v_1$ with Lorentz factor $\Gamma_1$, and shell 2 at speed $v_2$ with Lorentz factor $\Gamma_2$. Just before the two shells meet, the relative lorentz factor $\Gamma_r$...
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512 views

Non-inertial frames in Lagrangian mechanics?

Building on this Phys.SE post I am interested in how non-inertial frames can be considered in Lagrangian mechanics. My understanding is that changing the reference frame causes a transformation of the ...
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0answers
28 views

Traveling near the speed of light? [duplicate]

Suppose we can travel on a spacecraft near the speed of light, how long it would take for the person on the spacecraft to travel one light year, not to a person observing him/her from Earth, if there ...
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402 views

Isn't the aether existent?

Before you say I'm wrong consider this, Einstein is supposedly the first person to get completely get rid of the various aether models that were proposed. But didn't Einstein actually prove them right ...
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3answers
159 views

Isn't a physical frame of reference useless for calculating speed? [closed]

Please ignore relativistic effects and the effects of the expansion of space-time due to the expanding universe theory for the purposes of this question. Whenever someone asks what is the speed of X, ...
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499 views

If traveling at the speed of lights stops time, why does it take light 8 minutes to reach Earth?

I just learned that, according to Einstein's relativity theory, time reaches zero for an observer (light) when traveling at the speed of light, so everything is supposed to be at the same place in the ...
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21 views

I need a good book for learning mechanics in non-inertial frames [duplicate]

I'm studying classical mechanics, but without those stuffs Lagrangians and Hamiltonian mechanics...just Newtonian..the problem is a find hard to learn this non-inertial frames system, like $r=R+r'$......
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1answer
92 views

Shooting a bullet in space [closed]

Imagine I was in space holding a gun and I shot a bullet from it. Do I go back? Or does the bullet move forward? Or both of us go in the same speed at different directions? Or what? Please Explain. ...
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1answer
74 views

Non-inertial system [duplicate]

Supposing I am in a non-inertial system and I don't know what forces are acting. How can I test EXPERIMENTALLY and in practice to be in a non inertial system? If I am in a system and I don't know how ...
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2answers
441 views

Is this an inertial frame of reference in relativistic context?

What I've learned from our special relativity lectures is that an inertial frame of reference in relativity is one that experiences no gravitational forces. Also, it is a frame where if a particle is ...
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654 views

Lorentz transformation of Gamma matrices $\gamma^{\mu}$

From my understanding, gamma matrices transforms under Lorentz transformation $\Lambda$ as \begin{equation} \gamma^{\mu} \rightarrow S[\Lambda]\gamma^{\mu}S[\Lambda]^{-1} = \Lambda^{\mu}_{\nu}\gamma^{\...
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126 views

Can we observe two different events occuring at the same point?

I was wondering a situation. Suppose a train is moving with a certain acceleration. It turns on its front light at a certain time, and it's back light say t s after. But to a inertial, or non ...
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138 views

Newton's laws in non inertial frame

Suppose we take a two particle system in CM frame such that the particles are connected by a massless spring and a force $F$ is applied on one particle ($m_1$ and $m_2$. Let $F$ acting on $m_2$). Now ...
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1answer
455 views

Newton's first law of motion a corollary of second law? [duplicate]

His first law of motion states that every object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force. That means, delta(...
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1answer
181 views

Is distance always 0 relative to an object moving at speed of light $c$?

As I understand it, when an object is traveling at the speed of light, relative to itself all travel is instantaneous and the distance is zero. If a photon traveling from the sun was aligned with the ...
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2answers
172 views

The invariance vs constancy of the speed of light in vacuum

This is perhaps as much a question of semantics as of physics but it is something I have been thinking about recently and was wondering if anyone else had a perspective on this. Now, it could be that ...
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2answers
2k views

Is the Earth the center of the Solar System? [duplicate]

Alright guys, so I attracted you with the title. Now, to preface the question, I am fully aware of the work of Copernicus, as well as the concepts of Heliocentrism and Barycentric Coordinates. I have ...
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1answer
65 views

Is gravitation time dilation simply c/v?

Recently, I've been very interested in forms of time dilation. I'm relatively new to relativity, so I apologize for any stupid mistake I may make. I was messing with the equation for gravitational ...
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Why the speed of light in vacuum is same in all inertial reference frames? [duplicate]

If Cathy’s velocity toward Bill and away from Amy is v = 0.9c, Cathy finds, by making measurements in her reference frame, that the light from Bill approaches her at speed c, not at c + v = 1.9c. And ...
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163 views

Derivation of length contraction from lorentz transforms

i have struggled to understand how length contraction is derived. My lecture book says: length in frame S is defined as $L=x(b)-x(a)$ and in S' as: $L'=x'(b)-x'(a)$ transforming $x'(b)$ and $x'(a)$ ...
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129 views

How fast do you have to be traveling in order to travel one light year in one year due to relativistic effects?

My apologies if my understanding is incorrect, but I believe that as you approach relativistic speeds you experience time dilation as compared to an outside observer. So taking into account this ...